Session 2014 - 15
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Other Bills before Parliament


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

74

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

(c)    

the defendant(s) have been charged, but not convicted of a slavery or

 

trafficking offence, and protection from the risk of the commission of a

 

slavery or trafficking offence cannot be achieved by bail conditions

 

alone, or

 

(d)    

the defendant(s) are part of or affiliated with a group or organisation

 

engaged in slavery or trafficking offences and whose core offenders are

 

currently being prosecuted.’

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

81

 

Clause  24,  page  18,  line  30,  after “satisfied”, insert “beyond reasonable doubt”

 


 

Karen Bradley

 

13

 

Clause  26,  page  19,  line  42,  at end insert—

 

“( )    

where the order was made on an application by the Director General of

 

the National Crime Agency (“the Director General”), the Director

 

General.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment enables the Director General of the National Crime Agency to apply to the

 

appropriate court to vary, renew or discharge a slavery and trafficking risk order.

 

Karen Bradley

 

14

 

Clause  26,  page  20,  line  5,  after “defendant” insert “or require the defendant to

 

comply with section (Slavery and trafficking risk orders: requirement to provide name

 

and address)(3) to (6)”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment provides that a slavery and trafficking risk order may be varied to require the

 

defendant to provide details of his or her name and address if the tests in clause 26(4) are met.

 

Karen Bradley

 

15

 

Clause  26,  page  20,  line  13,  at end insert—

 

“(b)    

may require the defendant to comply with section (Slavery and

 

trafficking risk orders: requirement to provide name and address)(3) to

 

(6) only if the court is satisfied that the requirement is necessary for that

 

purpose.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment provides that a renewed or varied slavery and trafficking prevention order may

 

require the defendant to provide details of his or her name and address only if the court is satisfied

 

it is necessary for the purpose in clause 26(4)(b).

 

Karen Bradley

 

16

 

Clause  26,  page  20,  line  20,  leave out from beginning to “to” in line 21 and insert

 

“Where an immigration officer or the Director General makes an application under this

 

section, the officer or the Director General must give notice of the application”

 

Member’s explanatory statement


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

75

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

This amendment requires the Director General of the National Crime Agency to notify the relevant

 

chief officer of police of an application by the Director General to vary, renew or discharge a

 

slavery and trafficking risk order.

 

Karen Bradley

 

17

 

Clause  26,  page  20,  line  23,  after “officer” insert “or the Director General”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment is consequential on amendment 16.

 


 

Karen Bradley

 

18

 

Clause  27,  page  21,  line  15,  at end insert—

 

“(5A)    

The order may (as well as imposing prohibitions on the defendant) require the

 

defendant to comply with subsections (3) to (6) of section (Slavery and trafficking

 

risk orders: requirement to provide name and address).

 

    

If it does, those subsections apply as if references to a slavery and trafficking risk

 

order were to an interim slavery and trafficking risk order.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment enables an interim slavery and trafficking risk order to require the defendant to

 

provide details of his or her name and address.

 


 

Karen Bradley

 

19

 

Clause  29,  page  22,  line  8,  after “19(4)” insert “or 25(4) (requirement to surrender

 

passports)”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment is consequential on amendment 20 and is rearranging existing provision in the

 

Bill (relating to the offence of failing to surrender a passport) without changing its effect.

 

Karen Bradley

 

20

 

Clause  29,  page  22,  line  9,  leave out “25(4)” and insert “(Slavery and trafficking

 

prevention orders: requirement to provide name and address)(1)”, 21(5A), (Slavery and

 

trafficking risk orders: requirement to provide name and address)(1) or 27(5A)

 

(requirement to provide name and address)

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment makes it an offence for a defendant to fail to give notification of the defendant‘s

 

name or address where this requirement has been imposed as a part of a slavery and trafficking

 

prevention or risk order (or an interim order).

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

82

 

Clause  29,  page  22,  line  14,  leave out from “fine” to end of line.


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

76

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

83

 

Clause  29,  page  22,  line  18,  leave out from “(3)(b)” to end of line 20.

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

84

 

Clause  29,  page  22,  line  20,  at end add—

 

“(6)    

The court may refer to the crown court any matter relating to the order for

 

consideration of action by the said court under Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime

 

Act 2002.”

 


 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

85

 

Clause  32,  page  23,  line  2,  after “guidance”, insert “no later than within one month

 

of this Act obtaining Royal Assent.”

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

86

 

Clause  32,  page  23,  line  8,  after “published”, insert “in both Houses of Parliament

 

and”

 


 

Mark Durkan

 

55

 

Page  24,  line  18,  leave out Clause 34.

 


 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

50

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  1,  at end insert—

 

“(c)    

the support offered to victims, including but not limited to, the operations

 

of any Government agency and support offered in accordance with

 

section 41 and section 42,

 

(d)    

any other area which the Commissioner feels is relevant to identifying

 

and preventing human trafficking in the UK or elsewhere.”.


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

77

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

51

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  4,  leave out “permitted matter” and insert “matter

 

pertinent to the prevention of human trafficking and forced labour in the UK or

 

elsewhere”.

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

52

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  13,  leave out subsection (3) and insert—

 

“(3)    

Apart from under subsection (5), the Secretary of State must not take steps or

 

impose measures that may impair, or may appear to impair the Commissioner’s

 

independence and shall ensure that the Commissioner is, to the extent the

 

Commissioner is able, to determine, without limitation (other than as prescribed

 

in this Act)—

 

(a)    

the Commissioner’s activities;

 

(b)    

the Commissioner’s timetables;

 

(c)    

the Commissioner’s priorities, and

 

(d)    

the Commissioner’s resources and funding.”.

 

Mark Durkan

 

56

 

Page  24,  line  38,  leave out Clause 35.

 


 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

71

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  9,  after “act”, insert “or the person is a child”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

72

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  10,  after “compulsion”, insert “or, in the case of a child,

 

the illegal act”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

74

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  11,  leave out paragraph (c)

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

53

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  13,  at end insert—

 

“(9)    

Once the defence set out in subsection (1) is raised by the accused or on his or her

 

behalf, or the court of its own volition or on hearing submissions from any party


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

78

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

decides that such a defence should be considered by the court, the burden of

 

proving that the offence was not committed as a direct and immediate response

 

of him or her being a victim as set out in subsection (1) shall lie upon the

 

prosecution.”.

 

Sarah Teather

 

88

 

Parliamentary Star - white    

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  14,  leave out from “characteristics” to end of line 15 and

 

insert “shall include, but not be limited to, age, family relationships, disability, position

 

of dependency, language skills, ethnicity, national origin, religious background, and any

 

mental or physical illness.”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

73

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  18,  after “compulsion”, insert “or in the case of a child, the

 

illegal act”

 

Mark Durkan

 

75

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  27,  leave out subsection (7)

 


 

Sarah Teather

 

89

 

Parliamentary Star - white    

Schedule  3,  page  38,  line  15,  leave out paragraph 14.

 

Sarah Teather

 

90

 

Parliamentary Star - white    

Schedule  3,  page  38,  line  30,  leave out paragraphs 16 and 17.

 


 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Sarah Teather

 

42

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  2,  leave out “may” and insert “must”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

63

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  2,  after “arrangements”, insert “to set up an independent

 

body known as the child trafficking advocacy service”

 

Sarah Teather

 

91

 

Parliamentary Star - white    

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  3,  after “advocates”, insert “and separated children

 

advocates”


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

79

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Sarah Teather

 

92

 

Parliamentary Star - white    

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  4,  after “trafficking”, insert “and all separated children”

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

99

 

Parliamentary Star    

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  4,  at end insert “or slavery if the person who has parental

 

responsibility for the child fulfils any of the conditions in subsection (1D).

 

(1A)    

The child trafficking advocate will act in the best interest of the child and be

 

appointed as soon as any public authority or relevant body has a reasonable

 

suspicion to believe the child is such a victim.

 

(1B)    

The child trafficking advocate will have powers to appoint and instruct legal

 

representatives on behalf of the child in all matters relevant to the interest of the

 

child.

 

(1C)    

The child trafficking advocate shall at a minimum have responsibilities to—

 

(a)    

advocate that all decisions relating to the child are made in the child’s

 

best interest;

 

(b)    

ascertain the child’s wishes and feelings in relation to those decisions;

 

(c)    

advocate for the child to receive appropriate care, safe accommodation,

 

medical treatment, including psychological assistance, education,

 

translation and interpretation services are required;

 

(d)    

assist the child to access legal and other representation where necessary;

 

(e)    

consult with, advise and keep the child informed of legal rights;

 

(f)    

keep the child informed of all relevant immigration, criminal,

 

compensation, community care, public law or other proceedings;

 

(g)    

contribute to identification of a plan to safeguard and promote a durable

 

solution for the child based on an individual assessment of that child’s

 

best interests;

 

(h)    

provide a link between the child and various statutory and other bodies

 

who may provide services to the child, accompanying the child to any

 

relevant meetings;

 

(i)    

assist in establishing contact with the child’s family, where the child so

 

wishes and it is in the child’s best interest;

 

(j)    

liaise with all professionals handling the child’s case including

 

immigration, police, social welfare, health, education and support

 

services; and

 

(k)    

accompany the child wherever it is deemed appropriate to do so.

 

(1D)    

Subsection (1) shall apply if the person who has parental responsibility for the

 

child—

 

(a)    

is suspected of taking part in the trafficking of human beings;

 

(b)    

has another conflict of interest with the child;

 

(c)    

is not in contact with the child;

 

(d)    

cannot be identified;

 

(e)    

is in a country outside the United Kingdom; or

 

(f)    

is a local authority.

 

(1E)    

A child trafficking advocate must have completed the training required in

 

subsection (10) and may be—

 

(a)    

an employee of a statutory body except for an employee of a local

 

authority;

 

(b)    

an employee of a recognised charitable organisation; or

 

(c)    

a volunteer for a recognised charitable organisation.


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 4 September 2014                  

80

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

(1F)    

A person discharging duties as a child trafficking advocate shall not discharge

 

any other statutory duties in relation to a child for whom they are providing

 

assistance under this section.

 

(1G)    

The child trafficking advocate may request a public authority or relevant body to

 

co-operate with them in any way that the advocate considers necessary and that

 

is in the best interest of the child. A public authority or relevant body must so far

 

as reasonably practicable comply with a request made to it under this section.

 

(1H)    

In subsection (1G) a “relevant body” means a person or organisation—

 

(a)    

which provides services to the child; or

 

(b)    

to which a child makes an application for services; or

 

(c)    

to which the child needs access in relation to being a victim of human

 

trafficking; or

 

(d)    

any court or tribunal that a child engages with.

 

(1I)    

The Secretary of State shall by order—

 

(a)    

set out the arrangements for the appointment of a child trafficking

 

advocate immediately after a child is identified as a potential victim of

 

trafficking in human beings;

 

(b)    

set out requirements for the training courses to be completed before a

 

person may exercise functions as a child trafficking advocate;

 

(c)    

set out the arrangements for the supervision of persons discharging duties

 

as a child trafficking advocate;

 

(d)    

set out the arrangements for the provision of support services for persons

 

discharging duties as a child trafficking advocate; and

 

(e)    

designate organisations as a “recognised charitable organisation” for the

 

purpose of this section.

 

(1J)    

A person’s appointment as a child trafficking advocate for a particular child under

 

this section shall come to an end if—

 

(a)    

the child reaches the age of 21; or

 

(b)    

a durable solution for the child has been found based on an individual

 

assessment of the best interests of the child.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment provides for child trafficking advocates to be appointed for children who are

 

believed to be victims of human trafficking and slavery so that their best interests are represented.

 

The amendment sets out the minimum responsibilities of the advocates ensuring the advocates will

 

have a strong and recognised statutory authority. The amendment includes the power for

 

advocates to appoint and instruct the child’s legal representatives where appropriate.

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

100

 

Parliamentary Star    

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  5,  leave out subsections (2), (3), (4) and (5).

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment is consequential on amendment 99.

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

60

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  7,  leave out “any person who” and insert “any organisation

 

that”


 
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Revised 4 September 2014