Session 2014 - 15
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Other Bills before Parliament


 
 

159

 

House of Commons

 
 

Thursday 11 September 2014

 

Public Bill Committee

 

New Amendments handed in are marked thus Parliamentary Star

 

Parliamentary Star - whiteAmendments which will comply with the required notice period at their next appearance

 

Modern Slavery Bill


 

Note

 

The Amendments have been arranged in accordance with the Order of the

 

Committee [21 July 2014].

 


 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

50

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  1,  at end insert—

 

“(c)    

the support offered to victims, including but not limited to, the operations

 

of any Government agency and support offered in accordance with

 

section 41 and section 42,

 

(d)    

any other area which the Commissioner feels is relevant to identifying

 

and preventing human trafficking in the UK or elsewhere.”

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

111

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  1,  at end insert—

 

“(c)    

the promotion and protection of the rights of victims of human trafficking

 

and slavery.

 

(1A)    

The Commissioner must monitor the implementation in the UK of the Trafficking

 

Convention, Anti-Trafficking Directive and other international obligations.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment extends the functions of the Commissioner beyond law enforcement and

 

identification of victims and gives the Commissioner responsibility for monitoring the

 

implementation of international obligations on modern slavery.


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 11 September 2014                

160

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

51

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  4,  leave out “permitted matter” and insert “matter

 

pertinent to the prevention of human trafficking and forced labour in the UK or

 

elsewhere”

 

Fiona Bruce

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

119

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  9,  at end insert—

 

“( )    

Undertaking investigations and studies to monitor and identify trends in human

 

trafficking and slavery;

 

( )    

Requesting inspections to be carried out by statutory inspectors;”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment extends the permitted activities of the Commissioner in carrying out the general

 

functions.

 

Fiona Bruce

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

120

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  12,  at end insert “, including relevant civil society

 

organisations”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment adds thats the Commissioner may work with relevant civil society organisations.

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

52

 

Clause  35,  page  25,  line  13,  leave out subsection (3) and insert—

 

“(3)    

Apart from under subsection (5), the Secretary of State must not take steps or

 

impose measures that may impair, or may appear to impair the Commissioner’s

 

independence and shall ensure that the Commissioner is, to the extent the

 

Commissioner is able, to determine, without limitation (other than as prescribed

 

in this Act)—

 

(a)    

the Commissioner’s activities;

 

(b)    

the Commissioner’s timetables;

 

(c)    

the Commissioner’s priorities, and

 

(d)    

the Commissioner’s resources and funding.”

 

Mark Durkan

 

56

 

Page  24,  line  38,  leave out Clause 35.

 



 
 

Public Bill Committee: 11 September 2014                

161

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

113

 

Clause  36,  page  25,  line  29,  at end insert—

 

“(1A)    

When preparing the strategic plan the Commissioner must give consideration to

 

any proposal submitted to the Commissioner from any Parliamentary Select

 

Committee. If the Commissioner does not accept the Committee’s proposal the

 

Commissioner must write to the relevant Committee explain the decision.”

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

114

 

Clause  36,  page  26,  line  4,  leave out “Secretary of State” and insert “Parliament”.

 

Mark Durkan

 

107

 

Clause  36,  page  26,  line  12,  at end insert—

 

“(8)    

An annual report can also include observations and recommendations as to the

 

adequacty, efficacy and co-ordination of measures, policies and perfomance of

 

relevant services including public authorities as specified in Clause 37 section 5

 

or under relevant devolved powers.”

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

115

 

Clause  36,  page  26,  line  13,  leave out subsection (9).

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

116

 

Clause  36,  page  26,  line  18,  leave out “Secretary of State may” and insert

 

“Commissioner must consult with the Secretary of State and”

 


 

Mark Durkan

 

108

 

Clause  37,  page  26,  line  38,  at end insert—

 

“(6)    

Specified public authority can also include a public authority which has been

 

specified under relevant procedures of devolved institutions.”

 


 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

71

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  9,  after “act”, insert “or the person is a child”


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 11 September 2014                

162

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

72

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  10,  after “compulsion”, insert “or, in the case of a child,

 

the illegal act”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

74

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  11,  leave out paragraph (c)

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

53

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  13,  at end insert—

 

“(9)    

Once the defence set out in subsection (1) is raised by the accused or on his or her

 

behalf, or the court of its own volition or on hearing submissions from any party

 

decides that such a defence should be considered by the court, the burden of

 

proving that the offence was not committed as a direct and immediate response

 

of him or her being a victim as set out in subsection (1) shall lie upon the

 

prosecution.”

 

Sarah Teather

 

88

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  14,  leave out from “characteristics” to end of line 15 and

 

insert “shall include, but not be limited to, age, family relationships, disability, position

 

of dependency, language skills, ethnicity, national origin, religious background, and any

 

mental or physical illness.”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

73

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  18,  after “compulsion”, insert “or in the case of a child, the

 

illegal act”

 

Mark Durkan

 

75

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  27,  leave out subsection (7).

 

Diana Johnson

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Phil Wilson

 

125

 

Clause  39,  page  27,  line  28,  at end insert—

 

“(9)    

The Anti-Slavery Commissioner shall in their annual report produced under

 

section 36, include a review of the offences listed in Schedule 3.”

 


 

Sarah Teather

 

89

 

Schedule  3,  page  38,  line  15,  leave out paragraph 14.


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 11 September 2014                

163

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

Sarah Teather

 

90

 

Schedule  3,  page  38,  line  30,  leave out paragraphs 16 and 17.

 


 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Sarah Teather

 

42

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  2,  leave out “may” and insert “must”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

63

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  2,  after “arrangements”, insert “to set up an independent

 

body known as the child trafficking advocacy service”

 

Sarah Teather

 

91

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  3,  after “advocates”, insert “and separated children

 

advocates”

 

Sarah Teather

 

92

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  4,  after “trafficking”, insert “and all separated children”

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Fiona Bruce

 

99

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  4,  at end insert “or slavery if the person who has parental

 

responsibility for the child fulfils any of the conditions in subsection (1D).

 

(1A)    

The child trafficking advocate will act in the best interest of the child and be

 

appointed as soon as any public authority or relevant body has a reasonable

 

suspicion to believe the child is such a victim.

 

(1B)    

The child trafficking advocate will have powers to appoint and instruct legal

 

representatives on behalf of the child in all matters relevant to the interest of the

 

child.

 

(1C)    

The child trafficking advocate shall at a minimum have responsibilities to—

 

(a)    

advocate that all decisions relating to the child are made in the child’s

 

best interest;

 

(b)    

ascertain the child’s wishes and feelings in relation to those decisions;

 

(c)    

advocate for the child to receive appropriate care, safe accommodation,

 

medical treatment, including psychological assistance, education,

 

translation and interpretation services are required;

 

(d)    

assist the child to access legal and other representation where necessary;

 

(e)    

consult with, advise and keep the child informed of legal rights;

 

(f)    

keep the child informed of all relevant immigration, criminal,

 

compensation, community care, public law or other proceedings;

 

(g)    

contribute to identification of a plan to safeguard and promote a durable

 

solution for the child based on an individual assessment of that child’s

 

best interests;


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 11 September 2014                

164

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

(h)    

provide a link between the child and various statutory and other bodies

 

who may provide services to the child, accompanying the child to any

 

relevant meetings;

 

(i)    

assist in establishing contact with the child’s family, where the child so

 

wishes and it is in the child’s best interest;

 

(j)    

liaise with all professionals handling the child’s case including

 

immigration, police, social welfare, health, education and support

 

services; and

 

(k)    

accompany the child wherever it is deemed appropriate to do so.

 

(1D)    

Subsection (1) shall apply if the person who has parental responsibility for the

 

child—

 

(a)    

is suspected of taking part in the trafficking of human beings;

 

(b)    

has another conflict of interest with the child;

 

(c)    

is not in contact with the child;

 

(d)    

cannot be identified;

 

(e)    

is in a country outside the United Kingdom; or

 

(f)    

is a local authority.

 

(1E)    

A child trafficking advocate must have completed the training required in

 

subsection (10) and may be—

 

(a)    

an employee of a statutory body except for an employee of a local

 

authority;

 

(b)    

an employee of a recognised charitable organisation; or

 

(c)    

a volunteer for a recognised charitable organisation.

 

(1F)    

A person discharging duties as a child trafficking advocate shall not discharge

 

any other statutory duties in relation to a child for whom they are providing

 

assistance under this section.

 

(1G)    

The child trafficking advocate may request a public authority or relevant body to

 

co-operate with them in any way that the advocate considers necessary and that

 

is in the best interest of the child. A public authority or relevant body must so far

 

as reasonably practicable comply with a request made to it under this section.

 

(1H)    

In subsection (1G) a “relevant body” means a person or organisation—

 

(a)    

which provides services to the child; or

 

(b)    

to which a child makes an application for services; or

 

(c)    

to which the child needs access in relation to being a victim of human

 

trafficking; or

 

(d)    

any court or tribunal that a child engages with.

 

(1I)    

The Secretary of State shall by order—

 

(a)    

set out the arrangements for the appointment of a child trafficking

 

advocate immediately after a child is identified as a potential victim of

 

trafficking in human beings;

 

(b)    

set out requirements for the training courses to be completed before a

 

person may exercise functions as a child trafficking advocate;

 

(c)    

set out the arrangements for the supervision of persons discharging duties

 

as a child trafficking advocate;

 

(d)    

set out the arrangements for the provision of support services for persons

 

discharging duties as a child trafficking advocate; and

 

(e)    

designate organisations as a “recognised charitable organisation” for the

 

purpose of this section.

 

(1J)    

A person’s appointment as a child trafficking advocate for a particular child under

 

this section shall come to an end if—

 

(a)    

the child reaches the age of 21; or


 
 

Public Bill Committee: 11 September 2014                

165

 

Modern Slavery Bill, continued

 
 

(b)    

a durable solution for the child has been found based on an individual

 

assessment of the best interests of the child.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment provides for child trafficking advocates to be appointed for children who are

 

believed to be victims of human trafficking and slavery so that their best interests are represented.

 

The amendment sets out the minimum responsibilities of the advocates ensuring the advocates will

 

have a strong and recognised statutory authority. The amendment includes the power for

 

advocates to appoint and instruct the child’s legal representatives where appropriate.

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Fiona Bruce

 

100

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  5,  leave out subsections (2), (3), (4) and (5).

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment is consequential on amendment 99.

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

60

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  7,  leave out “any person who” and insert “any organisation

 

that”

 

Fiona Mactaggart

 

Michael Connarty

 

Sarah Teather

 

Sarah Champion

 

Mike Keane

 

Sir Andrew Stunell

 

Mark Durkan

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

98

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  8,  at end add “and who must act in the child’s best

 

interests.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment makes clear that the fundamental duty of any child’s advocate is to act in the

 

child’s best interests, including where a child is not able to identify or ariticulate their own best

 

interest (for example, as a result of being groomed and/or exploited).

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

61

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  8,  at end insert—

 

“(2A)    

A child trafficking advocate may be an employee of—

 

(a)    

an independent statutory body; or

 

(b)    

a recognised charitable organisastion.”

 

Sarah Teather

 

93

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  11,  after “advocates”, insert “and separated children

 

advocates”


 
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Revised 11 September 2014