Session 2014 - 15
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Other Bills before Parliament


 
 

199

 

House of Commons

 
 

Tuesday 14 October 2014

 

Public Bill Committee

 

New Amendments handed in are marked thus Parliamentary Star

 

Parliamentary Star - whiteAmendments which will comply with the required notice period at their next appearance

 

Modern Slavery Bill


 

Note

 

The Amendments have been arranged in accordance with the Order of the

 

Committee [21 July 2014].

 


 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Sarah Teather

 

Fiona Bruce

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  2,  leave out “may” and insert “must”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  2,  after “arrangements”, insert “to set up an independent

 

body known as the child trafficking advocacy service”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  3,  after “advocates”, insert “and separated children

 

advocates”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  4,  after “trafficking”, insert “and all separated children”

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Fiona Bruce

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  4,  at end insert “or slavery if the person who has parental

 

responsibility for the child fulfils any of the conditions in subsection (1D).


 
 

Public Bill Committee:                               

200

 

, continued

 
 

(1A)    

The child trafficking advocate will act in the best interest of the child and be

 

appointed as soon as any public authority or relevant body has a reasonable

 

suspicion to believe the child is such a victim.

 

(1B)    

The child trafficking advocate will have powers to appoint and instruct legal

 

representatives on behalf of the child in all matters relevant to the interest of the

 

child.

 

(1C)    

The child trafficking advocate shall at a minimum have responsibilities to—

 

(a)    

advocate that all decisions relating to the child are made in the child’s

 

best interest;

 

(b)    

ascertain the child’s wishes and feelings in relation to those decisions;

 

(c)    

advocate for the child to receive appropriate care, safe accommodation,

 

medical treatment, including psychological assistance, education,

 

translation and interpretation services are required;

 

(d)    

assist the child to access legal and other representation where necessary;

 

(e)    

consult with, advise and keep the child informed of legal rights;

 

(f)    

keep the child informed of all relevant immigration, criminal,

 

compensation, community care, public law or other proceedings;

 

(g)    

contribute to identification of a plan to safeguard and promote a durable

 

solution for the child based on an individual assessment of that child’s

 

best interests;

 

(h)    

provide a link between the child and various statutory and other bodies

 

who may provide services to the child, accompanying the child to any

 

relevant meetings;

 

(i)    

assist in establishing contact with the child’s family, where the child so

 

wishes and it is in the child’s best interest;

 

(j)    

liaise with all professionals handling the child’s case including

 

immigration, police, social welfare, health, education and support

 

services; and

 

(k)    

accompany the child wherever it is deemed appropriate to do so.

 

(1D)    

Subsection (1) shall apply if the person who has parental responsibility for the

 

child—

 

(a)    

is suspected of taking part in the trafficking of human beings;

 

(b)    

has another conflict of interest with the child;

 

(c)    

is not in contact with the child;

 

(d)    

cannot be identified;

 

(e)    

is in a country outside the United Kingdom; or

 

(f)    

is a local authority.

 

(1E)    

A child trafficking advocate must have completed the training required in

 

subsection (10) and may be—

 

(a)    

an employee of a statutory body except for an employee of a local

 

authority;

 

(b)    

an employee of a recognised charitable organisation; or

 

(c)    

a volunteer for a recognised charitable organisation.

 

(1F)    

A person discharging duties as a child trafficking advocate shall not discharge

 

any other statutory duties in relation to a child for whom they are providing

 

assistance under this section.

 

(1G)    

The child trafficking advocate may request a public authority or relevant body to

 

co-operate with them in any way that the advocate considers necessary and that

 

is in the best interest of the child. A public authority or relevant body must so far

 

as reasonably practicable comply with a request made to it under this section.

 

(1H)    

In subsection (1G) a “relevant body” means a person or organisation—


 
 

Public Bill Committee:                               

201

 

, continued

 
 

(a)    

which provides services to the child; or

 

(b)    

to which a child makes an application for services; or

 

(c)    

to which the child needs access in relation to being a victim of human

 

trafficking; or

 

(d)    

any court or tribunal that a child engages with.

 

(1I)    

The Secretary of State shall by order—

 

(a)    

set out the arrangements for the appointment of a child trafficking

 

advocate immediately after a child is identified as a potential victim of

 

trafficking in human beings;

 

(b)    

set out requirements for the training courses to be completed before a

 

person may exercise functions as a child trafficking advocate;

 

(c)    

set out the arrangements for the supervision of persons discharging duties

 

as a child trafficking advocate;

 

(d)    

set out the arrangements for the provision of support services for persons

 

discharging duties as a child trafficking advocate; and

 

(e)    

designate organisations as a “recognised charitable organisation” for the

 

purpose of this section.

 

(1J)    

A person’s appointment as a child trafficking advocate for a particular child under

 

this section shall come to an end if—

 

(a)    

the child reaches the age of 21; or

 

(b)    

a durable solution for the child has been found based on an individual

 

assessment of the best interests of the child.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment provides for child trafficking advocates to be appointed for children who are

 

believed to be victims of human trafficking and slavery so that their best interests are represented.

 

The amendment sets out the minimum responsibilities of the advocates ensuring the advocates will

 

have a strong and recognised statutory authority. The amendment includes the power for

 

advocates to appoint and instruct the child’s legal representatives where appropriate.

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Fiona Bruce

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  5,  leave out subsections (2), (3), (4) and (5).

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment is consequential on amendment 99.

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  7,  leave out “any person who” and insert “any organisation

 

that”

 

Fiona Mactaggart

 

Michael Connarty

 

Sarah Teather

 

Sarah Champion

 

Mike Keane

 

Sir Andrew Stunell

 

Mark Durkan

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  8,  at end add “and who must act in the child’s best

 

interests.”


 
 

Public Bill Committee:                               

202

 

, continued

 
 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

The amendment makes clear that the fundamental duty of any child’s advocate is to act in the

 

child’s best interests, including where a child is not able to identify or ariticulate their own best

 

interest (for example, as a result of being groomed and/or exploited).

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  8,  at end insert—

 

“(2A)    

A child trafficking advocate may be an employee of—

 

(a)    

an independent statutory body; or

 

(b)    

a recognised charitable organisastion.”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  11,  after “advocates”, insert “and separated children

 

advocates”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  14,  after “advocate”, insert “or separated children

 

advocate”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  15,  after “advocate”, insert “or separated children

 

advocate”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  17,  after “advocates”, insert “or separated children

 

advocates”

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  19,  after “advocates”, insert “or separated children

 

advocates”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  19,  at end add—

 

‘(e)    

requiring advocates to act for the child when he lacks the legal capacity

 

to do so and also ensure that other service providers act in his best

 

interests and provide him with the necessary services and support to meet

 

the Government’s obligations under the Council of Europe Convention

 

and EU Anti-Trafficking Directive.”

 

Mark Durkan

 

Sarah Teather

 

Clause  41,  page  28,  line  19,  at end insert—


 
 

Public Bill Committee:                               

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, continued

 
 

“(4A)    

The Secretary of State must publish guidance that defines the role, functions and

 

responsibilities of the child trafficking advocates.”

 

Mr David Hanson

 

Diana Johnson

 

Phil Wilson

 

Page  28,  line  1,  leave out Clause 41.

 

Fiona Bruce

 

Mr David Burrowes

 

Page  28,  line  23,  leave out Clause 42.

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment is consequential on New Clause 29.

 

Sarah Champion

 

Diana Johnson

 

Clause  43,  page  28,  line  40,  leave out “with functions under relevant

 

arrangements”

 

Sarah Champion

 

Diana Johnson

 

Clause  43,  page  28,  line  41,  after “trafficking”, insert “or slavery”

 

Sarah Champion

 

Diana Johnson

 

Clause  43,  page  29,  line  1,  after (2) insert “Unless and”

 

Sarah Champion

 

Diana Johnson

 

Clause  43,  page  29,  line  2,  after “determined”, insert “and no challenges to that

 

determination are pending”

 

Sarah Champion

 

Diana Johnson

 

Clause  43,  page  29,  line  2,  leave out from “for” to “that” in line 3.


 
 

Public Bill Committee:                               

204

 

, continued

 
 

Sarah Champion

 

Diana Johnson

 

Clause  43,  page  29,  line  5,  leave out subparagraph (3).

 

Fiona Mactaggart

 

Schedule  4,  page  43,  line  21,  at end insert—

 

“Street Offences Act 1959

 

(10)    

Omit section 1.”

 

Karen Bradley

 

Schedule  4,  page  44,  line  3,  at end insert “, and

 

(b)    

in paragraph (e) for “(da)” substitute “(db)””

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment makes a further amendment to the Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 1992 in

 

consequence of the amendment made to that Act by paragraph 4 of Schedule 4.

 

Karen Bradley

 

Schedule  4,  page  44,  line  12,  leave out “paragraph” and insert “paragraphs

 

31(2)(b) and”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment repeals a provision which is redundant in consequence of amendment 22.

 

Karen Bradley

 

Schedule  4,  page  44,  line  25,  leave out from beginning to end of line 26 and

 

insert—

 

    “( )  

Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Serious Crime Act 2007 (serious offences: England

 

and Wales) is amended as follows.

 

      ( )  

After paragraph 1 insert—

 

“Slavery etc

 

1A         

An offence under section 1 of the Modern Slavery Act 2014

 

(slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour).”

 

      ( )  

In paragraph 2—”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment amends the Serious Crime Act 2007 so that an offence under clause 1 will be a

 

serious criminal offence for the purposes of Part 1 of that Act (power to make serious crime

 

prevention orders against a person who has been involved in serious crime).

 

Karen Bradley

 

Schedule  4,  page  45,  line  2,  at end insert—


 
 

Public Bill Committee:                               

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, continued

 
 

“Administration of Justice Act 1970 (c. 31)

 

9A  (1)  

The Administration of Justice Act 1970 is amended as follows.

 

      (2)  

In section 41(8) (enforcement of orders for compensation etc) for “or 13A”

 

substitute “, 13A or 13B”.

 

      (3)  

In Part 1 of Schedule 9 (enforcement of orders for compensation etc) after

 

paragraph 13A insert—

 

“13B      

Where under section 8 of the Modern Slavery Act 2014 a court

 

makes a slavery and trafficking reparation order.”

 

Criminal Justice Act 1991 (c. 53)

 

9B  (1)  

Section 24 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 (recovery of fines by deduction

 

from certain benefits) is amended as follows.

 

      (2)  

In subsection (1), for “or unlawful profit order” substitute “, an unlawful profit

 

order or a slavery and trafficking reparation order”.

 

      (3)  

In subsection (3)(b), for “or unlawful profit order” substitute “, an unlawful

 

profit order or a slavery and trafficking reparation order”.

 

      (4)  

In subsection (4), after the definition of “prescribed” insert—

 

““slavery and trafficking reparation order” means an order under section

 

8 of the Modern Slavery Act 2014;”.

 

Social Security (Recovery of Benefits) Act 1997 (c. 27)

 

9C         

In paragraph 2 of Schedule 1 to the Social Security (Recovery of Benefits) Act

 

1997 (exempted payments), for “2000 or” substitute “2000, section 8 of the

 

Modern Slavery Act 2014,”.

 

Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000 (c. 6)

 

9D         

In section 133(3)(c) of the Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000

 

(review of compensation orders), for the words from “a confiscation order” to

 

the end substitute “any or all of the following made against him in the same

 

proceedings—

 

(i)    

a confiscation order under Part 6 of the Criminal

 

Justice Act 1988 or Part 2 of the Proceeds of Crime

 

Act 2002;

 

(ii)    

an unlawful profit order under section 4 of the

 

Prevention of Social Housing Fraud Act 2013;

 

(iii)    

a slavery and trafficking reparation order under

 

section 8 of the Modern Slavery Act 2014; or”.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment and amendment 26 make amendments of legislation consequential on the

 

provisions about reparation orders in clauses 8 to 10. They provide for reparation orders to be

 

treated in a similar way to compensation orders under section 130 of the Powers of Criminal

 

Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000.

 

Karen Bradley

 

Schedule  4,  page  45,  line  42,  at end insert—

 

“15      

In Schedule 11 to the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (amendments), omit

 

paragraph 37(3).


 
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Revised 14 October 2014