Session 2017-19
Internet Publications
Other Bills before Parliament


 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

8

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

Christine Jardine

 

NC11

 

Parliamentary Star    

To move the following Clause—

 

         

“Education: safe use of personal data

 

(1)    

The Children and Social Work Act 2017 is amended as follows.

 

(2)    

In section 35 (other personal, social, health and economic education), after

 

subsection (1)(b) insert—

 

“(1A)    

In this section, “personal, social, health and economic education” shall

 

include education relating to the safe use of personal data.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This new clause would enable the Secretary of State to require that personal information safety be

 

taught as a mandatory part of the national PSHE curriculum.

 

 


 

Christine Jardine

 

18

 

Parliamentary Star    

Clause  7,  page  5,  line  24,  after “subsections” insert “(1A),”.

 

Christine Jardine

 

19

 

Parliamentary Star    

Clause  7,  page  5,  line  24,  at end insert—

 

“(1A)    

A primary care service provider is not a “public authority” or “public body” for

 

the purposes of the GDPR merely by virtue of the fact that it is defined as a public

 

authority by either—

 

(a)    

any of paragraphs 43A to 45A or paragraph 51 of Schedule 1 to the

 

Freedom of Information Act 2000, or

 

(b)    

any of paragraphs 33 to 35 of Schedule 1 to the Freedom of Information

 

(Scotland) Act 2002 (asp 13).”

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

4

 

Clause  10,  page  6,  line  37,  leave out subsections (6) and (7)

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would remove delegated powers that would allow the Secretary of State to vary

 

the conditions and safeguards governing the general processing of sensitive personal data.

 



 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

9

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

5

 

Clause  14,  page  8,  line  11,  at end insert—

 

“(2A)    

A decision that engages an individual’s rights under the Human Rights Act 1998

 

does not fall within Article 22(2)(b) of the GDPR (exception from prohibition on

 

taking significant decisions based solely on automated processing for decisions

 

that are authorised by law and subject to safeguards for the data subject’s rights,

 

freedoms and legitimate interests).

 

(2B)    

A decision is “based solely on automated processing” for the purposes of this

 

section if, in relation to a data subject, there is no meaningful input by a natural

 

person in the decision-making process.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that where human rights are engaged by automated decisions these

 

are human decisions and provides clarification that purely administrative human approval of an

 

automated decision does make an automated decision a ‘human’ one.

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

6

 

Page  9,  line  36,  leave out Clause 16

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would remove delegated powers that would allow the Secretary of State to add

 

further exemptions.

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

7

 

Clause  35,  page  22,  line  14,  leave out subsections (6) and (7)

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would remove delegated powers that would allow the Secretary of State to vary

 

the conditions and safeguards governing the general processing of sensitive personal data.

 



 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

10

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

2

 

Clause  50,  page  30,  line  28,  at end insert—

 

    

“and

 

(c)    

it does not engage the rights of the data subject under the Human Rights

 

Act 1998.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that automated decisions should not be authorised by law if they

 

engage an individual’s human rights.

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

8

 

Clause  86,  page  51,  line  21,  leave out subsections (3) and (4)

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would remove delegated powers that would allow the Secretary of State to vary

 

the conditions and safeguards governing the general processing of sensitive personal data.

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

3

 

Clause  96,  page  56,  line  38,  after “law” insert “unless the decision engages an

 

individual’s rights under the Human Rights Act 1998”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that automated decisions should not be authorised by law if they

 

engage an individual’s human rights.

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

Caroline Lucas

 

9

 

Page  63,  line  27,  leave out Clause 113

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would remove delegated powers that would allow the Secretary of State to create

 

new exemptions to Part 4 of the Bill.

 



 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

11

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

Christine Jardine

 

17

 

Parliamentary Star    

Clause  203,  page  121,  line  32,  at end insert—

 

“(aa)    

sections [Publishers of news-related material: damages and costs] and

 

[Publishers of news-related material: interpretive provisions].”

 


 

Tom Watson

 

Liam Byrne

 

Louise Haigh

 

Chris Elmore

 

NS1

 

To move the following Schedule—

 

“Bill of Data Rights in the Digital Environment

 

            

The UK recognises the following Data Rights:

 

Article 1 —Equality of Treatment

 

            

Every data subject has the right to fair and equal treatment in the processing of

 

his or her personal data.

 

Article 2 — Security

 

            

Every data subject has the right to security and protection of their personal data

 

and information systems.

 

            

Access requests by government must be for the purpose of combating serious

 

crime and subject to independent authorisation.

 

Article 3 — Free Expression

 

            

Every data subject has the right to deploy his or her personal data in pursuit of

 

their fundamental rights to freedom of expression, thought and conscience.

 

Article 4 — Equality of Access

 

            

Every data subject has the right to access and participate in the digital

 

environment on equal terms.

 

            

Internet access should be open.

 

Article 5 — Privacy

 

            

Every data subject has the right to respect for their personal data and

 

information systems and as part of his or her fundamental right to private and

 

family life, home and communications.

 

            

 

Article 6 — Ownership

 

            

Every data subject has the right to own and control his or her personal data.

 

            

Every data subject is entitled to proportionate share of income or other benefit

 

derived from his or her personal data as part of the right to own.


 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

12

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

Article 7— Control

 

            

Every data subject is entitled to know the purpose for which personal data is

 

being processed. Data controllers should not deliberately extend the gathering

 

of personal data solely for their own purposes. Government, corporations,

 

public authorities and other data controllers must obtain meaningful consent

 

for the use of people’s personal data. Every data subject has the right to own

 

curate, move, revise or review their personal data.

 

Article 8— Algorithms

 

            

Every data subject has the right to transparent and equal treatment in the

 

processing of his or her personal data by an algorithm or automated system.

 

            

Every data subject is entitled to meaningful human control in making

 

significant decisions – algorithms and automated systems must not be

 

deployed to make significant decisions.

 

Article 9— Participation

 

            

Every data subject has the right to deploy his or her personal data and

 

information systems to communicate in pursuit of the fundamental right to

 

freedom of association.

 

Article 10— Protection

 

            

Every data subject has the right to safety and protection from harassment and

 

other targeting through use of personal data whether sexual, social or

 

commercial.

 

Article 11 — Removal

 

            

Every data subject is entitled to revise and remove their personal data.

 

Compensation

 

            

Breach of any right in this Bill will entitle the data subject to fair and equitable

 

compensation under existing enforcement provisions. If none apply, the Centre

 

for Data Ethics will establish and administer a compensation scheme to ensure

 

just remedy for any breaches.

 

Application to Children

 

            

The application of these rights to a person less than 18 years of age must be

 

read in conjunction with the rights set out in the United Nations Convention on

 

the Rights of the Child. Where an information society service processes data

 

of persons less than 18 years of age it must do so under the age appropriate

 

design code set out in section 123 of this Act.”

 

 


 

Frank Field

 

1

 

Schedule  1,  page  123,  line  16,  at end insert—

 

““obligations” includes any requirement which may be placed upon the

 

Secretary of State to supply to local authorities data relating to individual

 

eligibility for benefits, thereby enabling local authorities automatically to


 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

13

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

register all eligible children for free school meals, Healthy Start

 

vouchers, free early years education and childcare, or any other purpose

 

designated by the Secretary of State.”

 


 

Caroline Lucas

 

16

 

Parliamentary Star - white    

Schedule  2,  page  140,  line  15,  at end insert—

 

“(1A)    

The exemption in sub-paragraph (1) may not be invoked in relation to offences

 

under—

 

(a)    

sections 24, 24A, 24B or 24C of the Immigration Act 1971,

 

(b)    

section 21 of the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006, or

 

(c)    

sections 33A and 33B of the Immigration Act 2014.”

 

Tom Watson

 

Liam Byrne

 

Louise Haigh

 

Chris Elmore

 

Sir Edward Davey

 

Layla Moran

Tim Farron

Christine Jardine

Caroline Lucas

Jamie Stone

Jo Swinson

Tom Brake

Stephen Lloyd

 

15

 

Schedule  2,  page  141,  line  17,  leave out paragraph 4

 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

10

 

Schedule  2,  page  152,  line  24,  leave out paragraph 19 and insert—

 

“19      

The listed GDPR provisions do not apply to personal data that consists of

 

information which is protected by legal professional privilege or the duty of

 

confidentiality.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that both legal professional privilege and confidentiality are

 

recognised within the legislation.

 

Julie Elliott

 

Alex Cunningham

 

Edward Miliband

 

Christine Jardine

 

14

 

Schedule  2,  page  156,  line  4,  at end insert—

 

“(d)    

any code which is adopted by an approved regulator as defined by section

 

42(2) of the Crime and Courts Act 2013.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would give the Standards Code of an approved press regulator the same status as


 
 

Notices of Amendments: 24 April 2018                  

14

 

Data Protection Bill-[Lords], continued

 
 

the other journalism codes recognised in the Bill (The BBC and Ofcom Codes, and the Editors’

 

Code observed by members of IPSO).

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

11

 

Schedule  11,  page  196,  line  39,  leave out paragraph 9 and insert—

 

“9         

The listed provisions do not apply to personal data that consists of information

 

which is protected by legal professional privilege or the duty of

 

confidentiality.”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that both legal professional privilege and confidentiality are

 

recognised within the legislation.

 


 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

12

 

Schedule  15,  page  208,  line  13,  leave out “with respect to obligations, liabilities or

 

rights under the data protection legislation”

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that both legal professional privilege and confidentiality are

 

recognised within the legislation.

 

Brendan O’Hara

 

Stuart C. McDonald

 

13

 

Schedule  15,  page  208,  line  21,  leave out from “proceedings” to the end of line 23.

 

Member’s explanatory statement

 

This amendment would ensure that both legal professional privilege and confidentiality are

 

recognised within the legislation.

 

 

Order of the House [5 March 2018]

 

That the following provisions shall apply to the Data Protection Bill [Lords]:

 

Committal

 

1.    

The Bill shall be committed to a Public Bill Committee.

 

Proceedings in Public Bill Committee

 

2.    

Proceedings in the Public Bill Committee shall (so far as not previously

 

concluded) be brought to a conclusion on Tuesday 27 March 2018.

 

3.    

The Public Bill Committee shall have leave to sit twice on the first day on

 

which it meets.


 
PreviousBack to StartNext
 

Revised 24 April 2018