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Low Flying

Mr. Ingram : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if pilots of jet aircraft, other than Royal Air Force Jaguars, using the United Kingdom low flying system, are required to report to their commanding officers any use of reheat at heights below 1,000 ft ; (2) if he will list the number of reported occasions on which military jet aircraft have used reheat in the United Kingdom low flying system at heights less than recommended in the United Kingdom military low flying handbook ;

(3) if pilots of Royal Air Force Jaguars using the United Kingdom low flying system are required to report to their commanding officers any u se of reheat at heights below 500 ft.

Mr. Neubert [holding answer 23 January 1989] : It is standard procedure for aircrew to debrief, normally to their authorising officer, on all aspects of a training sortie in order to confirm that the requirements of a sortie have been met. The debrief provides the opportunity for the aircrew to report any difficulties encountered during the sortie. Central records of occasions on which military jet aircraft have used reheat in the United Kingdom low flying system are not held.

Low-flying Aircraft (Air Traffic Zones)

Dr. Thomas : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what are the conditions under which low-flying military aircraft may penetrate military air traffic zones during low-level training sorties.

Mr. Neubert [holding answer 16 December 1988] : Low flying military aircraft are permitted to penetrate a military air traffic zone only with clearance from the controlling authority.

HOME DEPARTMENT

Firearms

Mr. William Ross : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applications by (a) established registered firearms dealers and (b) the holders of section one firearms' certificates have been refunded since 1 August 1987 to 31 December 1988 or to the latest available date ; and how many in each of the categories were granted.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : The latest information is published in tables 5 and 1 of Home Office statistical bulletin 33/88 "Statistics on the operation of the Firearms Act 1968, England and Wales 1987", a copy of which is in the Library.

Rule 43

Mr. Barry Field : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners were held under


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rule 43 on the last date for which figures are available ; and what change has there been in numbers since the introductions of fresh start.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Fresh start was implemented at most prison service establishments during the second half of 1987. On 30 June 1988 (the latest date for which figures are readily available) 2,011 adult male prisoners were segregated under prison rule 43 for their own protection. The number so segregrated on 31 December 1987 was 1, 814.

Football Hooligans

Mr. Adley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent discussions he has had with chief constables about football hooligans ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : The Home Office is in regular contact with the Association of Chief Police Officers about this matter. The association was represented on the Minister or Sport's working party and will continue to be involved in discussions on the implementation of the Football Spectators Bill.

Football Clubs (Membership Scheme)

Mr. John Evans : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if his Department will maintain, or have access to, lists of football supporters after the introduction of the proposed identity card scheme.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : The details of the national football membership scheme will be drawn up by the proposed football membership authority, which will be responsible for holding membership records. I do not envisage any need for my Department to have access or to replicate these records.

Police Surgeons

Mr. Rooker : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will order an inquiry into delays in the attendance of general practitioners employed as part-time police surgeons attending to victims of rape and violent crime.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : No. Police surgeons are appointed by police authorities and it is for each police authority and chief constable to ensure that suitable arrangements are made to secure the necessary coverage by police surgeons within the force area. If the hon. Member has a particular problem in mind, he should in the first instance take it up with the chief constable.

Prison Kitchens

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the answer to the right hon. Member for Stoke-on-Trent, South, Official Report, 15 November 1988, column 551, how his Department monitors the standard of prison kitchen inspections ; whose advice is sought on whether or not they are at a standard equivalent to those carried out by local authority environmental health officers ; who carries out the inspections of prison kitchens ; what are their qualifications, experience and expertise in food hygiene ; how frequent are inspections ; in what circumstances the advice


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of local authority officers is sought ; how often advice has been sought ; and in how many cases it was to take preventive action rather than to cope with a food poisoning or other problem.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Home Office health and safety officers and supply and transport branch headquarters catering managers carry out formal hygiene inspections of prison catering facilities. Each establishment receives at least an annual inspection by one of these officers. Some are inspected more regularly. All the inspecting officers have received appropriate training and hold the diploma in food hygiene of the Royal Institute of Public Health and Hygiene. All the inspecting catering managers have extensive knowledge and experience of the food hygiene problems associated with large-scale catering operations. The health and safety officers are specialist full-time personnel who have wide-ranging background training and experience in health and safety matters. Inspections are carried out to a predetermined format which ensures that all aspects of hygiene are checked and assessed.

A number of random validation inspections are carried out by an environmental health officer from the Department of Health. These inspections assist in monitoring the efficacy of the main inspection arrangements. Local authority environmental health officers are called in to provide assistance and expertise in tracing the source of an outbreak of food poisoning. This recognises the need for additional special skills and experience under these circumstances. Prison medical officers are also authorised to seek their advice when it is considered to be appropriate.

More generally, guidance has recently been issued to governors and medical officers encouraging them to establish a working relationship with local authority environmental health officers. This may include visits to prisons in an informal advisory capacity. Records of the number of visits by local authority officers to prisons, and the purposes of those visits, are not held centrally.

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the answer to the right hon. Member for Stoke-on-Trent, South, Official Report, 15 November 1988, column 551, what progress has been made regarding an improvement in the standards of the 13 of the 21 prison kitchens inspected by the Institution of Environmental Health Officers which had standards of hygiene so low as to warrant prosecution were it not for Crown immunity.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : A further exchange of letters has taken place between the prison department and the Institution of Environmental Health Officers. Relevant background details of the institution's survey have not yet been released to the prison department. A considered response to the institution's survey will be made as soon as relevant background material is made available.

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether food prepared in the normal prison kitchen is served in prison hospitals.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Yes.

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the current budget for maintaining and improving hygiene in prison kitchens ; and what has been the budget in each of the last five years.


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Mr. Douglas Hogg : The cost of maintaining and improving hygiene in prison kitchens is subsumed within the total running costs of the prison service. It is not practicable to extract information on the level of funding dedicated specifically to hygiene in prison kitchens.

Mr. Raoul Wallenberg

Mr. Amess : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish in the Official Report the letter and enclosure of 7 November 1988, sent by the hon. Member for Basildon to his Department regarding Mr. Raoul Wallenberg ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Renton : I have placed a copy of the letter and enclosure by Professor Elie Wiesel in the Library, with a copy of my reply to which I have nothing to add.

Food Poisoning (Prisons)

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many outbreaks of food poisoning in prisons have there been in each of the last five years for which figures are available.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Six confirmed outbreaks of salmonella food poisoning have been reported and investigated since 1984. There have been no known cases of other outbreaks of food poisoning.

Prison Hospitals

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners are currently in prison hospitals ; what proportion this is of the prison population ; and how many suffer from (a) AIDS, (b) tuberculosis and (c) other serious long-term illnesses.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : The number of prisoners in hospital is not known centrally. In the year ended 31 March 1988 the average daily number of patients in prison hospitals was 1,923 representing 3.9 per cent. of the average population for that year. The available information about the incidence of physical diseases of special interest in that year is contained in appendix 5 to the report on the work of the prison service April 1987-March 1988 (Cm. 516). The only current figures available centrally relate to cases of HIV infection including AIDS. On 26 January 1989 the number of reported HIV antibody positive prisoners was 58. There was no reported case of AIDS.

Prisons (Safety and Hygiene)

Mr. Ashley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what information is required by his Department from prison governors regarding safety and hygiene in prisons.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Prison governors must provide a health and safety policy statement covering the entire establishment. This statement will be reviewed annually. Governors are also required to report the completion of an annual safety audit.

In addition, action plans must be submitted in response to recommendations made following hygiene inspections of catering facilities and full health and safety inspections.

Medical officers are required to submit six-monthly reports on health and hygiene standards throughout their establishment.


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Wormwood Scrubs

Mr. Soley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make it his policy to commend the relevant staff of Wormwood Scrubs prison on their decision to invite the environmental health officer to inspect the prison hospital and on the decision to close it pending improvement.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : The decision to close a temporary in-patient facility at the prison was taken by the principal medical officer on 12 January, following environmental deterioration caused by defective sanitary installations in adjacent areas of the building. An environmental health officer visited the prison later that day at the request of the principal medical officer to see and advise on conditions in the affected accommodation. Both the closure action and the subsequent decision to seek the environmental health officer's advice are fully supported by the director of prison medical services. I gladly endorse his commendation of the principal medical officer for her prompt response to a situation which in her professional judgment had become unacceptable.

Mr. Soley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make funds available to ensure Wormwood Scrubs prison hospital is brought up to the standard necessary to reopen it.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Repairs have already been made to enable the hospital to reopen for out-patient use and contracts previously let for refurbishment at the prison incorporate upgrading of the hospital. The proposed longer-term redevelopment of Wormwood Scrubs includes the construction of a new hospital.

Health Officers (Prisons)

Mr. Soley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will advise all prison governors to invite an environmental health officer to inspect their premises.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : Advice has recently been issued to all prison governors and medical officers encouraging them to liaise with local authority environmental health officers. The liaison may include informal visits to prisons by environmental health officers.

HIV

Mr. Sayeed : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consideration has been given to making it a criminal offence for a person who knows that they are HIV positive to act in such a way that makes it possible that they will infect another.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given yesterday to my hon. Friend the Member for Warrington, South (Mr. Butler).

Terrorist Organisations

Mr. Hunter : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many citizens of other countries have each year since 1979 been denied entry into the United Kingdom or deported from the United Kingdom because of their suspected connection with terrorist organisations of other countries ;


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(2) if he will name those citizens of other countries who have been denied entry into the United Kingdom or deported from the United Kingdom because of their suspected connection with terrorist organisations of other countries.

Mr. Renton : The available information refers to the total number of exclusions under section 13(5) of the Immigration Act 1971 and to deportations under section 15(3) of the Act.


            |Exclusion  |Deportation            

------------------------------------------------

1979-83     |n/a        |Nil                    

1984        |27         |21                     

1985        |40         |17                     

1986        |47         |25                     

1987        |14         |5                      

1988        |27         |1                      

It is not our practice to give names of persons against whom action is taken under the Immigration Act or in matters of a security nature, although we are ready to confirm details of decisions which are already in the public domain.

Mr. Hunter : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is his policy towards members of terrorists organisations or self- proclaimed liberation movements meeting and conspiring in the United Kingdom to further their objectives in their own countries.

Mr. Hurd : Any person legitimately in this country may engage in activities which are within the law. If there was clear evidence of a crime having been committed here by such a person either in the form of a substantive offence or a conspiracy to commit an offence elsewhere which gave rise to an offence under United Kingdom law, it would be a matter for the police to take action.

In addition and when appropriate I would not hesitate to use my powers under the Immigration Act to exclude or deport from this country such a person whose presence here was considered to be not conducive to the public good.

Terrorism

Mr. Hunter : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what definition of terrorism he uses in formulating his policy in response to terrorism ;

(2) what definition of the term international terrorism he uses in formulating his policy in response to terrorism.

Mr. Hurd : There is no internationally agreed definition of terrorism. For practical purposes we rest on the definition in the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Act 1984 and in the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Bill currently before the House.

Mr. Hunter : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will list those countries with which the United Kingdom has signed a formal agreement with regard to combating terrorism ; (2) if he will list those countries with which the United Kingdom has come to an informal understanding with regard to combating terrorism ;

(3) if he will make a statement on the measures taken by the Government since 1979 to combat international terrorism ; and what assessment he has made of the success of these measures ;


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(4) what further measures he proposes to take to combat international terrorism.

Mr. Hurd : We are totally committed to the fight against terrorism and to the need for international co-operation to prevent and combat it. We have taken, and will continue to take, an active role in the relevant international bodies, such as Trevi, to secure a common, firm policy about international terrorism and practical measures to deter and defeat the terrorist.

The first aim of Governments must be to prevent acts of terrorism ; if prevention fails, the aim must be to resolve incidents with the minimum loss of life and to bring terrorists to justice. Underlying this policy is the fundamental principle that there should be no substantive concessions to terrorists demands.

We will continue to pursue this policy vigorously in multilateral fora and in our bilateral links with our Community partners and with other like- minded third countries who share our resolve and commitment on this topic. In addition to multilateral agreements and co-operation, some countries like to have more formalised bilateral agreements to give additional political impetus to co-operation on the topic. I have signed such agreements with Morocco, Egypt and Italy.

Vigilantes (Underground)

Mr. Atkinson : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he has had any discussions with the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis on the independent establishment of vigilante groups on the London Underground ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Douglas Hogg : No. Policing the London Underground is the responsibility of the British Transport police. About 80 police officers from the Metropolitan and City of London police forces are to be loaned to the British Transport police L Division for the next 12 months. If the Guardian Angels or any other group act unlawfully or engage in conduct likely to provoke a breach of the peace, they cannot expect to be exempt from the ordinary processes of the law. But these would be operational issues for the police to consider.

Emergency 88 Conference

Mr. Gerald Bowden : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the Institute of Civil Defence Emergency 88 conference held in London last November ; and whether some financial support will be given towards the cost of this initiative.

Mr. John Patten : "Emergency 88" was a privately organised occasion, and it was made clear at the outset that support from official funds would not be available. That remains the position, but officials will continue to offer the organisers advice on how they might meet their costs.

Cash Limits

Mr. Sims : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he intends to make any changes to the 1988-89 cash limits within his responsibilities and to his Department's running costs limit.

Mr. Hurd : Subject to parliamentary approval of the necessary Supplementary Estimate, the cash limit on class


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XI, vote 2, prisons, England and Wales, will be increased by £109, 100,000 from £801,578,000 to £910,678,000. This increase will be charged to the reserve and will not therefore add to the planned total of public expenditure.

The additional provision is necessary because of the rise in the prison population. The elements of the extra costs are the emergency package of measures which I announced in March last, the costs of additional prison staff recruited for extra accommodation coming into use in 1988-89, and the cost, in the meantime, of accommodating prisoners in police cells.

The Home Office running cost limit will be increased by £21,296,000 from £807,799,000 to £829,095,000. This takes account of changes in provision on both class I, votes 2 and 3. The running cost provision in class XI, vote 2 will be increased by £23,300,000 from £594,658, 000 to £617,958,000 which takes account of the surrender of £433,000 as a consequence of the overspend of the running cost limit for 1987-88. The running cost provision on class XI vote 3, central administration, miscellaneous and community services and civil defence, England and Wales will be reduced by :

(a) £2,000,000 to offset partly the increase on class XI, vote 2. (b) £4,000 to reflect the Home Office's share of the costs of the recruitment under the direct entry Grade 7 competition for 1988 which will result in a corresponding increase in the running cost limit for the office of the Minister of the Civil Service, class XX, vote 1, from £213,141,000 to £211,137,000.

On class XI, vote 3 on which token provision of £1,000 is being sought, there will be an overall reduction of £4,000 in the cash limit from £410,168,000 to £410,164,000 to reflect the transfer of costs for the direct entry grade 7 competition.

SCOTLAND

Health Board Chairmen

Mr. Bill Walker : To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how he proposes to respond to the representation by health board chairmen on making their remuneration more equitable compared with that of the chairmen of health authorities in England.

Mr. Michael Forsyth : My right hon. and learned Friend accepts that the remuneration of health board chairmen should be amended to reflect more adequately the extent of their responsibilities, particularly in comparison with the chairmen of health authorities in England. He has therefore decided on the following levels of remuneration for chairmen with effect from 1 April 1989.


Health Board        |Remuneration             

----------------------------------------------

Greater Glasgow     |17,709                   

                                              

Lothian             |15,928                   

                                              

Grampian}           |14,148                   

Tayside}                                      

                                              

Lanarkshire}        |12,368                   

Argyll and Clyde}                             

                                              

Ayrshire and Arran}                           

Fife}                                         

Forth Valley}       |10,310                   

Highland}                                     

                                              

Borders}                                      

Dumfries and}       |8,243                    

Galloway}                                     

                                              

Orkney}                                       

Shetland}           |5,047                    

Western Isles}                                

                                              

Common Services                               

   Agency           |9,810                    

                                              

State Hospital      |9,494                    

WALES

Floods

Mr. Wigley : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish a table indicating the total expenditure by his Department on (a) flood prevention and (b) compensation or ex-gratia payments to persons or corporate bodies in Wales who have suffered the effects of floods.

Mr. Grist : The Department's expenditure, which is in the form of grant aid, is given in the table :


Year          |Expenditure £              

------------------------------------------

1978-79       |1,158,266                  

1979-80       |1,017,848                  

1980-81       |3,099,315                  

1981-82       |2,198,016                  

1982-83       |2,870,039                  

1983-84       |2,988,827                  

1984-85       |2,109,302                  

1985-86       |1,457,807                  

1986-87       |833,782                    

1987-88       |951,811                    

With regard to compensation or ex-gratia payments for those affected by flooding, the answer is none.

Mr. Wigley : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish in the Official Report a table showing the expenditure on flood prevention work for each district council area in Wales in each year since 1975.

Mr. Grist : The information requested is not held centrally.

Hospital and Community Health

Mr. Raffan : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales whether he has now reached decisions about the allocation of resources for hospital and community health services in Wales for 1989-90 ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Peter Walker : I announced on 21 December that, subject to parliamentary approval, I propose to provide £953 million in 1989-90 for the hospital and community health services in Wales. However, following a further review of other programme requirements, I am now pleased to amend the figure to £954.7 million. Excluding the costs of the artificial limb and appliance service (which is administered on my behalf by the Welsh health common services authority) £880.1 million will be provided for current purposes and £69.1 million for capital spending.


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For current spending this represents a net cash increase of £44 million. With the estimated saving of £16.3 million from the reduction in the rate of employers' superannuation contribution from 7.5 to 4 per cent. and £10.5 million from new cost improvement programmes and increased receipts from income generation schemes, the total increase in resources over 1988-89 is 8.6 per cent. This is on top of the additional funding which has been provided for the recurrent effect of this year's review bodies awards.

A total of £49.9 million will be available to health authorities for their discretionary use which represents a cash increase of 6.1 per cent. over this year's enhanced provision. £10.4 million will be allocated to centrally funded developments. These developments, which are as follows will considerably assist authorities in meeting future service requirements.


                                                    |£ million          

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Regional Services and Centrally Funded                                  

   Developments                                     |2.8                

Psychiatric development, joint financing with local                     

   authorities and schemes to combat the misuse                         

   of drugs                                         |1.6                

Consultant Expansion Programme                      |0.3                

Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening                |0.6                

AIDS                                                |0.4                

Revenue consequences of new capital development     |1.0                

Developments in information technology etc.         |0.8                

Waiting List Initiative                             |0.9                

Project 2000                                        |0.4                

Other                                               |1.6                

                                                    |-----              

                                                    |10.4               

Of the capital provision, £39 million will be made available to health authorities for their discretionary use. This amounts to an increase of almost 32 per cent. over last year's capital allocations. The balance is required for the all-Wales capital programme, details of which will be announced in due course.

Authorities will be able to retain the cash released through their cost improvement programmes and from income-generation schemes, and they will be able to retain the income raised from charges for private treatment. Authorities will also benefit from the retention of receipts from the sale of surplus land and buildings and this is expected to generate a further £3.9 million in 1989-90. In total, I will expect Welsh authorities to achieve additional savings, income and receipts amounting to at least 1.3 per cent. of their recurrent revenue allocations.

The current and capital allocations to individual authorities will be as shown in the table. These allocations do not take into account further sums which will be made available following decisions to be made on centrally funded developments for the coming year. The capital allocations to health authorities are additional to the sums which I announced on 21 December as being available under my programme for the valleys initiative.


Allocation (£ million)                                          

                |Current element|Capital element                

----------------------------------------------------------------

Clwyd           |107.130        |6.915                          

East Dyfed      |67.871         |1.967                          

Pembrokeshire   |25.454         |1.963                          

Gwent           |127.392        |7.308                          

Gwynedd         |64.002         |<1>1.741                       

Mid Glamorgan   |149.704        |7.168                          

Powys           |30.527         |1.589                          

South Glamorgan |172.722        |3.572                          

West Glamorgan  |110.212        |6.732                          

<1> In addition Gwynedd health authority will receive a further 

sum of around £1 million (to be funded from the repayment of    

brokerage loans entered into by authorities in 1988-89) in      

recognition of the effect of the Ysbyty Gwynedd litigation      

settlement upon capital formula calculations. The precise       

amount will be determined in due course following discussions   

with the authority.                                             

These current and capital allocations provide for real increase in spending by health authorities after taking account of the level of inflation forecast by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in his Autumn Statement. They more than fulfil the resource planning assumptions which were issued to authorities last year.

The current allocations, as in previous years, have been weighted in favour of those authorities which are shown by the latest revenue formula assessment to be furthest below their target shares of available revenue resources (which are based on the catchment populations for the services which they provide). As a result, eight of the nine district health authorities in Wales will be brought to within plus or minus 1 per cent. of their formula targets ; and the range of difference between the best and least well provided authorities will be reduced to less than 4 per cent. by comparison with over 13 per cent. only three years ago. This demonstrates the progress which the Government have made in recent years in achieving greater equality of revenue provision between health authorities in Wales.

The capital allocations have been determined in accordance with the first revise of the original capital formula assessment which includes an allowance for the progressive equalisation of capital stock between authorities. Copies of the revenue and capital formula assessments which have been used in determining these allocations will be placed in the Library of the House. Both formulae are currently under review by the joint Welsh Office/NHS resources allocation working group ; and I look forward to receiving the working group's report, together with health authorities' comments on the group's recommendation during the course of the next few months.

Welsh Language Teaching

Mr. Nicholas Bennett : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales (1) if he will list by local education authority and parliamentary constituency, the number and percentage of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Wales which currently provide Welsh tuition for some of their pupils ;

(2) if he will list by local education authority and parliamentary constituency, the number and percentage of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in Wales which currently provide Welsh tuition for all their pupils.

Mr. Wyn Roberts [holding answer 20 January 1989] : The information for each local education authority as at September 1987 is as follows :


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The number and percentage of schools providing Welsh tuition                                                       

                 Primary                                     Secondary                                             

                 All pupils            Some pupils           All pupils<1>         Some pupils                     

                |Number    |Percentage|Number    |Percentage|Number    |Percentage|Number    |Percentage           

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clwyd           |181       |71.8      |70        |27.8      |4         |12.1      |29        |87.9                 

Dyfed           |262       |81.1      |31        |9.6       |10        |30.3      |21        |63.6                 

Gwent           |-         |-         |6         |2.6       |-         |-         |10        |30.3                 

Gwynedd         |197       |99.5      |-         |-         |21        |87.5      |3         |12.5                 

Mid Glamorgan   |194       |62.2      |104       |33.3      |3         |7.1       |37        |88.1                 

Powys           |72        |63.2      |39        |34.2      |1         |7.7       |12        |92.3                 

South Glamorgan |34        |21.9      |64        |41.3      |1         |3.6       |26        |92.9                 

West Glamorgan  |77        |45.8      |80        |47.6      |3         |11.1      |24        |88.9                 

<1> Based on forms i-v only.                                                                                       

The information by parliamentary constituency could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Mr. Nicholas Bennett : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what percentage of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in each Welsh local education authority provided Welsh tuition for (a) all their pupils and (b) some of their pupils in 1965, 1970, 1974, 1979 and 1985, respectively.


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Mr. Wyn Roberts [holding answer 20 January 1989] : Information in respect of 1965, 1970 and 1974 is not available centrally. The information in respect of 1979 and 1985 is as follows :


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The percentage of schools providing Welsh tuition                                                                           

Percentage                                                                                                                  

                 1979                                            1985                                                       

                 Primary                 Secondary<1>            Primary                 Secondary<1>                       

                |All pupils |Some pupils|All pupils |Some pupils|All pupils |Some pupils|All pupils |Some pupils            

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Clwyd           |87.5       |12.5       |14.7       |82.4       |88.8       |10.4       |6.1        |87.9                   

Dyfed           |82.3       |7.3        |20.0       |77.1       |83.9       |6.1        |29.4       |64.7                   

Gwent           |-          |1.1        |-          |25.0       |-          |2.5        |-          |25.7                   

Gwynedd         |99.0       |1.0        |57.1       |42.9       |99.0       |1.0        |87.5       |12.5                   

Mid Glamorgan   |61.6       |28.1       |4.9        |90.2       |72.1       |19.2       |7.1        |88.1                   

Powys           |46.6       |35.9       |-          |91.7       |65.0       |29.1       |-          |92.3                   

South Glamorgan |30.9       |36.5       |3.3        |86.7       |21.3       |40.0       |3.4        |86.2                   

West Glamorgan  |40.9       |31.8       |3.8        |92.3       |46.5       |33.7       |11.1       |88.9                   

<1> Based on forms i-v only.                                                                                                


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