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Mr. Nicholls : There is no such thing as a Council of Europe decency threshold for a minimum acceptable level of earnings.


Column 570

Earnings (East Midlands)

Mr. Harry Barnes : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many workplaces were visited and how many of them were found to be illegally underpaying for the latest available year by the wages inspectorate divisions covering the east midlands.

Mr. Nicholls : Wages inspectorate statistics are not compiled for areas smaller than the inspectorate's nine divisions. In the midlands division in 1988, 103 workplaces were visited for advisory purposes and 2,609 were visited for the purpose of checking pay. A total of 747 were found to have underpaid one or more worker. However, this cannot be taken as representing the general level of non-compliance with wages council orders because the wages inspectorate target checks by visit on those workplaces thought more likely to underpay workers.

Earnings (North-West)

Mr. John Evans : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many employers were found to be illegally underpaying, and how many of them were prosecuted, in the latest available year by the wages inspectorate divisions covering the north-west.

Mr. Nicholls : The information is not available in the precise form requested because wages inspectorate statistics about compliance with wages orders are compiled on the basis of establishments rather than employers. In 1988, 869 establishments in the north-west were found to be underpaying. There were two prosecutions for underpaying.

Earnings (Scotland)

Mr. Tom Clarke : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many employers were found to be illegally underpaying, and how many of them were prosecuted, in the latest available year by the wages inspectorate divisions covering Scotland.

Mr. Nicholls : The information is not available in the precise form requested because wages inspectorate statistics about compliance with wages orders are compiled on the basis of establishments rather than employers. In 1988, 509 establishments in Scotland were found to be underpaying. There were no prosecutions.

Labour Statistics

Mr. John L. Marshall : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment by how much unemployment has fallen in the last two years ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Lee : In January 1989 the level of unemployment, seasonally adjusted, in the United Kingdom was 1,988,100 compared with 3,051,300 in January 1987, a fall of 1,063,200 on a consistent basis. Unemployment is now at its lowest level for eight years.

Earnings (Wales)

Mr. Roy Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many workplaces were visited, and how many of them were found to be illegally underpaying, for the latest available year by the wages inspectorate divisions covering Wales.


Column 571

Mr. Nicholls : In 1988, 15 workplaces were visited for advisory purposes and 1,014 were visited for the purposes of checking pay. A total of 446 were found to have underpaid one or more workers. However, this cannot be taken as representing the general level of non-compliance with wages council orders because the wages inspectorate target checks by visit on those workplaces thought more likely to underpay workers.

Training Places (Cost)

Mr. Leighton : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the average cost to the Exchequer of an employment training place.

Mr. Nicholls : The average cost to the Exchequer per trainee on employment training is expected to be approximately £2,300.

Mr. Derek Cain

Mr. Nellist : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment whether he has now received the written judgment of the High Court concerning the death of Derek Cain in 1982 ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Cope : Yes. The judgment related specifically to that case and no wide-ranging legal principles can be drawn from it. We are nevertheless studying the case closely to see what further practical improvements might be made in YTS health and safety arrangements.

Chlorofluorocarbons

Ms. Walley : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what is his best estimate of the amount of chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants under the control of his Department ;

(2) what plans there are to minimise the risk of leaks of chlorofluorocarbons from refrigeration and air conditioning systems under his Department's control.

Mr. Cope [holding answer 6 March 1989] : I refer the hon. Member to the reply given by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister to the hon. Member for Merionnydd Nant Conwy (Dr. Thomas) on Monday 6 March at column 387.

SOCIAL SECURITY

Community Care Grants

Mr. Alton : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) what has been the take-up of community care grants since their inception ;

(2) what has been the cost to public funds of community care grants over the period for which figures are available.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : I refer the hon. Member to the national summary information placed monthly in the Library.

Mr. Alton : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what has been the annual allocation by his Department for community care grants since their inception.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : The annual allocation in respect of community care grants for both 1988-89 and 1989-90 is £60 million.


Column 572

Mr. Alton : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what further steps he has taken to publicise the existence and availability of community care grants ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : I refer the hon. Member to my reply to the hon. Member for Don Valley (Mr. Redmond) on 17 January at columns 118-19.

Bed-and-Breakfast Accommodation

Mr. Fraser : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many families in Lambeth are receiving payments from his Department to meet the cost of living in bed-and-breakfast type accommodation.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : I regret the information requested is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Transitional Protection

Mr. Cummings : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many people in the Northern region, by area, are in receipt of transitional protection as a result of the April 1988 changes in housing benefit regulations.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : I regret that the information requested is not available.

Mr. Cummings : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will make a statement on the effect of transitional payments on the living standards of people who were in receipt of housing benefit prior to changes in the regulations in April 1988.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : The transitional payments scheme represents a fast and effective response to the problems caused for those in vulnerable groups who would otherwise have suffered too sharp a drop in their housing benefit following the changes last April.

Mr. Andrew Bowden : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will estimate (a) the total number of people and (b) the number of people in each local authority area who are entitled to claim for housing benefit transitional protection ; (2) how many claims for housing benefit transitional protection had been made by 28 February (a) in total and (b) in each local authority area ; and in each case how many were (i) successful and (ii) unsuccessful ;

(3) how many claims for housing benefit transitional protection are currently being considered (a) in total and (b) in each local authority area.

Mr. Hardy : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many people have claimed transitional protection payments ; what proportion of those have had their applications approved ; and by how much the number receiving these allowances differs from the estimated take-up.

Mr. Peter Lloyd [holding answer 2 March 1989] : Up to 300,000 people were originally estimated to be eligible for housing benefit transitional payments. Of the 439,129 applications for Housing Benefit transitional payments received at 3 March, a total of 183,783 have been successful. Of the 39,418 applications outstanding 30,487 are awaiting return of inquiry forms from local authorities.


Column 573

Applications will continue to be accepted until 30 June 1989. Information requested is currently available only on a national basis.

Social Security Spending

Mr. Robin Cook : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will publish a table showing (a) the figures in table 15.8 of Cm. 615 in constant 1988-89 prices, (b) the numbers receiving the benefits in each category and (c) an index showing the level of real expenditure per recipient in each category.


Column 574

Mr. Moore : The figures in table 15.8 of Cm. 615 in constant 1988-89 prices are shown in the table. Many people receive more than one benefit at the same time and detailed records of the numbers of all multiple beneficiaries and the combinations of benefits held within each client group are not kept. Therefore information on the numbers receiving benefits in each category and on the level of real expenditure per recipient in each category is not available. However table 15.6 of Cm. 615 provides details of the estimated numbers receiving each benefit at any one time.


Column 573


|c|Total benefit expenditure by broad groups of beneficiaries in real terms (1988-89 prices)|c|                                         

                          |1983-84   |1984-85   |1985-86   |1986-87   |1987-88   |1988-89<2>|1989-90   |1990-91   |1991-92              

                          |outturn   |outturn   |outturn   |outturn   |outturn   |outturn   |plans     |plans     |plans                

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Elderly people            |21,760    |22,000    |22,710    |23,530    |23,580    |22,960    |<1>23,580 |<1>24,600 |<1>25,100            

Sick and disabled people  |5,530     |5,990     |6,350     |6,960     |7,250     |7,600     |8,260     |9,000     |9,600                

Family                    |7,440     |7,710     |7,910     |8,040     |8,110     |7,990     |8,130     |8,600     |9,000                

Unemployed people         |6,960     |7,320     |7,640     |7,730     |6,640     |5,430     |4,990     |5,100     |5,300                

Widows and orphans        |1,340     |1,320     |1,280     |1,250     |1,200     |1,190     |1,160     |1,200     |1,100                

                          |---       |---       |---       |---       |---       |---       |---       |---       |---                  

Total benefit expenditure |43,020    |44,340    |45,890    |47,520    |46,770    |45,170    |<1>46,120 |<1>48,400 |<1>50,100            

<1>Includes extra help for poorer pensioners on income support from October 1989, announced on 24 November 1988 at column 249, of about 

£100 million in 1989-90 and £200 million in both 1990-91 and 1991-92.                                                                   

<2>Estimated.                                                                                                                           

Disabled People (Helios Programme)

Mr. Key : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he is able to announce the names of the local projects in the United Kingdom assisting disabled people which have been selected to participate in the European Community Helios programme.

Mr. Scott : I am pleased to announce that 15 United Kingdom projects have been selected, covering a wide range of types of disability and geographical location. Both the statutory and voluntary sectors are represented, and I am confident that all the projects will make an excellent contribution to the exchanges of experience and learning across Europe made possible by the EC Helios programme. The projects selected for each of the Commissions four networks are as follows :

Social Integration and Independent Living

East Sussex Pilot Project, Brighton.

Coleshill Social Centre, Llanelli, Dyfed.

Waltham Forest Disability Resource Centre, Walthamstow, London. Grampian Health Board independent living project for mentally handicapped clients.

Vocational Rehabilitation Centres

Billingham Employment Rehabilitation Centre, Cleveland. Enham Industries, Andover, Hampshire.

Pengwern Hall (MENCAP), Rhuddlan, Clwyd.

Queen Alexandra College, Birmingham Royal Institute for the Blind. Court Grange, Royal National Institute for the Deaf, Abbotskerswell, near Newton Abbot, Devon.

Atlantic House, Scottish Association for Mental Health (day services), Edinburgh.

Vocational Rehabilitation and Economic Integration

Mobile Assessment Project, Department of Economic Development, Employment Rehabilitation Unit, Newtown Abbey, County Antrim. Disabled Access to Technology Association (DATA), Bradford. Outset, Wandsworth, London.

School Integration


Column 574

River Bank School Project, Ashington, Morpeth, Northumberland. Swansea College Project, Swansea, West Glamorgan.

Rating Reform

Mrs. Ray Michie : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security whether he has any plans to make financial provision for people under 25 years receiving income support for payment of the community charge.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : People receiving income support will be entitled to a rebate of 80 per cent. of their community charge liability. And, as my right hon. Friend announced in his statement to the House on 27 October 1988 at column 455, there will be a once-and-for-all adjustment to income support levels from this April to help meet the minimum 20 per cent. contribution to the community charge which recipients will have to make. The amounts to be included in income support levels are £1.15 a week for single people aged 18 to 24 and £2.30 a week for couples.

Leaflets

Mr. Corbyn : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what are the reasons for the delays in processing applications for leaflets from the leaflets unit at Stanmore ; and if any measures are being taken to improve the service.

Mr. Graham : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what action he intends to take to reduce the six months' waiting time for his Department to supply information leaflets which have been requested by voluntary organisations in Scotland ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Peter Lloyd [holding answers 22 and 23 February 1989] : The principal factors causing delay in the distribution of some orders from Canons Park leaflet unit are the considerably increased demand for bulk orders, and the physical constraints of the unit which preclude an immediate expansion of capacity or the recruitment of any more staff to cope with this demand. Nevertheless a special


Column 575

priority 24-hour turn round dispatch has been agreed for all requests from citizens advice bureaux which are the major distributors of bulk quantities of leaflets outside the Department itself.

Individual copies of leaflets can be obtained from local offices of the Department or by ordering from the free telephone inquiry service, 0800 666 555.

The Department is urgently considering how best to restore the supply of leaflets to an acceptable level.

Reform of Social Security"

Mrs. Beckett : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will publish a revised version of tables P1 to P6 of the technical annex to the White Paper "Reform of Social Security" taking into account changes in prices, earnings and other relevant factors since 1985.


Column 576

Mr. Peter Lloyd [holding answer 13 December 1988] : The information requested is in the tables.

It should be noted that the contracted-out rebate assumed is 5.8 per cent. of earnings between the lower and upper limits for national insurance contributions, declining to 3.75 per cent. by 2018. The future figures are purely illustrative and should not be taken as precise predictions of what the contracted-out rebate will be. The lower and upper earnings limits are assumed to increase in future in line with prices. In all cases the contracted-out rebate is boosted by the 2 per cent. incentive addition which is to be given to personal pensions and newly contracted-out occupational schemes up to 1992-93.

Men are assumed to take their pension at 65, women at 60. The projections for widows assume that their husband dies after reaching 65.


Column 575


|c|P1 Pension projections for men retiring in 2013 onwards|c|                                                                                                                                                                                   

|c|Examples with more years of earnings|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                      

|c|Weekly pension basic pension plus additional pension plus personal pension or COMP pension|c|                                                                                                                                                

Age in 1988 and earnings         Personal pensions                                                                               Money purchase schemes                                                                                         

level                            Amount invested                                                                                 Amount invested                                                                                                

                 SERPS- people wiRebate only Rate of                             Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+4 per cent.                                             

                 contracted-out preturn over prices                              Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                                            

                                                 prices                                                                          prices                                          prices                                                         

                                |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.                    

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16  Low earner  |81             |87             |93             |101            |112            |122            |133            |118            |129            |141            |144            |159            |175                            

Middle earner   |105            |114            |123            |135            |155            |171            |188            |165            |182            |202            |208            |231            |257                            

High earner     |113            |127            |139            |154            |175            |194            |217            |186            |208            |233            |236            |265            |299                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

20  Low earner  |79             |84             |89             |94             |105            |113            |122            |110            |119            |129            |133            |144            |157                            

Middle earner   |104            |116            |125            |137            |155            |170            |187            |165            |181            |200            |205            |227            |252                            

High earner     |112            |130            |142            |157            |175            |194            |216            |187            |208            |232            |234            |261            |293                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

30  Low earner  |74             |77             |80             |84             |91             |96             |101            |95             |100            |106            |110            |116            |124                            

Middle earner   |106            |109            |114            |120            |136            |144            |153            |143            |152            |162            |171            |183            |196                            

High earner     |115            |120            |126            |132            |149            |158            |168            |157            |167            |178            |187            |200            |215                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

40  Low earner  |71             |69             |70             |72             |77             |78             |80             |79             |81             |83             |87             |88             |92                             

Middle earner   |101            |95             |97             |100            |111            |115            |119            |116            |120            |124            |132            |138            |143                            

High earner     |108            |101            |104            |106            |119            |123            |127            |124            |128            |133            |143            |148            |154                            


|c|P2 Pension projections for men retiring in 2013 onwards|c|                                                                                                                                                                                   

|c|Examples with fewer years of earnings|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                     

|c|Weekly pension basic pension plus additional pension plus personal pension or COMP pension|c|                                                                                                                                                

Age in 1988 and earnings         Personal pensions                                                                               Money purchase schemes                                                                                         

level                            Amount invested                                                                                 Amount invested                                                                                                

                 SERPS- people wiRebate only Rate of                             Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+4 per cent.                                             

                 contracted-out preturn over prices                              Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                                            

                                                 prices                                                                          prices                                          prices                                                         

                                |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.                    

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16  Low earner  |76             |81             |86             |92             |103            |111            |120            |108            |117            |127            |130            |142            |157                            

Middle earner   |104            |112            |121            |132            |152            |167            |184            |161            |178            |197            |203            |226            |251                            

High earner     |111            |122            |133            |146            |168            |186            |207            |179            |199            |222            |227            |254            |285                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

20  Low earner  |74             |79             |84             |89             |98             |106            |114            |103            |111            |120            |123            |134            |146                            

Middle earner   |103            |114            |123            |134            |152            |166            |183            |161            |177            |196            |201            |222            |247                            

High earner     |110            |128            |140            |155            |173            |192            |214            |184            |205            |230            |231            |259            |291                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

30  Low earner  |71             |74             |77             |80             |87             |91             |95             |90             |95             |100            |103            |109            |116                            

Middle earner   |104            |107            |112            |118            |134            |142            |151            |141            |150            |160            |170            |181            |195                            

High earner     |115            |120            |127            |132            |140            |158            |168            |157            |167            |178            |187            |200            |215                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

40  Low earner  |68             |66             |67             |68             |72             |73             |75             |74             |75             |77             |80             |82             |84                             

Middle earner   |101            |95             |97             |100            |111            |115            |119            |116            |120            |124            |132            |138            |143                            

High earner     |108            |101            |104            |100            |119            |123            |127            |124            |128            |133            |143            |148            |154                            


Column 577


|c|P3 Pension projections for women retiring in 2013 onwards|c|                                                                                                                                                                                 

|c|Examples with more years of earnings|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                      

|c|Weekly pension basic pension plus additional pension plus personal pension or COMP pension|c|                                                                                                                                                

Age in 1988 and earnings         Personal pensions                                                                               Money purchase schemes                                                                                         

level                            Amount invested                                                                                 Amount invested                                                                                                

                 SERPS- people wiRebate only Rate of                             Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+4 per cent.                                             

                 contracted-out preturn over prices                              Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                                            

                                                 prices                                                                          prices                                          prices                                                         

                                |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.                    

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16  Low earner  |62             |60             |62             |64             |69             |71             |74             |71             |74             |77             |79             |83             |88                             

Middle earner   |77             |74             |78             |82             |91             |96             |103            |95             |101            |108            |112            |120            |129                            

High earner     |93             |91             |97             |104            |116            |125            |135            |122            |132            |144            |148            |161            |177                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

20  Low earner  |60             |58             |60             |61             |65             |67             |69             |67             |69             |71             |74             |76             |79                             

Middle earner   |75             |72             |74             |77             |85             |89             |93             |89             |93             |98             |103            |108            |115                            

High earner     |92             |89             |93             |98             |110            |116            |124            |115            |122            |131            |137            |146            |157                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

30  Low earner  |64             |57             |57             |58             |64             |65             |66             |66             |67             |68             |74             |76             |77                             

Middle earner   |73             |65             |66             |67             |75             |77             |79             |78             |80             |82             |89             |92             |94                             

High earner     |84             |76             |78             |80             |90             |93             |96             |94             |97             |100            |109            |113            |117                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

40  Low earner  |52             |47             |48             |48             |50             |51             |51             |51             |52             |52             |54             |55             |56                             

Middle earner   |59             |54             |55             |55             |59             |60             |61             |60             |61             |62             |65             |66             |67                             

High earner     |69             |63             |64             |65             |69             |71             |72             |71             |73             |75             |78             |80             |82                             


|c|P4 Pension projections for men retiring in 2013 onwards|c|                                                                                                                                                                                   

|c|Examples with fewer years of earnings|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                     

|c|Weekly pension basic pension plus additional pension plus personal pension or COMP pension|c|                                                                                                                                                

Age in 1988 and earnings         Personal pensions                                                                               Money purchase schemes                                                                                         

level                            Amount invested                                                                                 Amount invested                                                                                                

                 SERPS- people wiRebate only Rate of                             Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+4 per cent.                                             

                 contracted-out preturn over prices                              Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                                            

                                                 prices                                                                          prices                                          prices                                                         

                                |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.                    

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16  Low earner  |61             |60             |62             |63             |67             |69             |72             |69             |71             |75             |76             |80             |84                             

Middle earner   |76             |74             |77             |81             |87             |91             |96             |90             |95             |101            |103            |110            |117                            

High earner     |90             |90             |95             |101            |109            |116            |125            |114            |122            |131            |133            |144            |156                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

20  Low earner  |60             |58             |59             |61             |64             |65             |67             |65             |67             |69             |71             |73             |75                             

Middle earner   |74             |72             |74             |76             |82             |85             |88             |84             |87             |91             |94             |98             |103                            

High earner     |90             |88             |91             |95             |103            |108            |113            |107            |112            |118            |122            |129            |136                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

30  Low earner  |53             |50             |50             |51             |54             |54             |54             |54             |55             |55             |58             |58             |59                             

Middle earner   |64             |58             |59             |59             |64             |65             |66             |66             |67             |68             |72             |73             |75                             

High earner     |78             |70             |71             |71             |80             |81             |82             |82             |83             |85             |92             |94             |96                             

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

40  Low earner  |49             |45             |45             |45             |47             |48             |48             |48             |48             |49             |51             |51             |51                             

Middle earner   |57             |50             |51             |51             |55             |55             |56             |56             |57             |57             |61             |61             |62                             

High earner     |69             |58             |59             |60             |66             |67             |68             |68             |69             |70             |76             |77             |79                             


|c|P5 Pension projections for men retiring in 2008 onwards|c|                                                                                                                                                                                   

|c|Examples with more years of earnings|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                      

|c|Weekly pension basic pension plus additional pension plus personal pension or COMP pension|c|                                                                                                                                                

Age in 1988 and earnings         Personal pensions                                                                               Money purchase schemes                                                                                         

level                            Amount invested                                                                                 Amount invested                                                                                                

                 SERPS- people wiRebate only Rate of                             Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+4 per cent.                                             

                 contracted-out preturn over prices                              Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                                            

                                                 prices                                                                          prices                                          prices                                                         

                                |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.                    

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16  Low earner  |81             |81             |85             |90             |100            |106            |113            |104            |111            |119            |124            |133            |144                            

Middle earner   |108            |111            |119            |129            |147            |159            |173            |155            |169            |185            |194            |211            |232                            

High earner     |124            |131            |143            |157            |178            |196            |216            |190            |209            |233            |238            |264            |294                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

20  Low earner  |78             |79             |82             |86             |94             |99             |105            |98             |104            |110            |115            |122            |130                            

Middle earner   |106            |107            |113            |120            |137            |147            |157            |145            |155            |167            |176            |189            |205                            

High earner     |125            |128            |137            |147            |168            |181            |196            |178            |192            |209            |218            |237            |259                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

30  Low earner  |80             |72             |74             |75             |85             |88             |90             |89             |91             |94             |102            |105            |109                            

Middle earner   |103            |95             |98             |101            |117            |121            |126            |122            |127            |133            |145            |152            |159                            

High earner     |119            |110            |114            |118            |136            |141            |148            |142            |149            |156            |169            |177            |187                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

40  Low earner  |65             |59             |60             |61             |65             |66             |66             |67             |67             |68             |72             |73             |75                             

Middle earner   |88             |79             |81             |82             |89             |91             |93             |92             |94             |97             |103            |105            |108                            

High earner     |102            |91             |93             |95             |104            |107            |110            |108            |111            |114            |122            |126            |130                            


Column 579


|c|P6 Pension projections for widows retiring in 2008 onwards|c|                                                                                                                                                                                

|c|Examples with less years of earnings|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                      

|c|Weekly pension basic pension plus additional pension plus personal pension or COMP pension|c|                                                                                                                                                

Age in 1988 and earnings         Personal pensions                                                                               Money purchase schemes                                                                                         

level                            Amount invested                                                                                 Amount invested                                                                                                

                 SERPS- people wiRebate only Rate of                             Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+2 per cent.                              Rebate+4 per cent.                                             

                 contracted-out preturn over prices                              Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                             Rate of return over                                            

                                                 prices                                                                          prices                                          prices                                                         

                                |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.    |3 per cent.    |3 1/2 per cent.|4 per cent.                    

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

16  Low earner  |72             |78             |82             |87             |95             |101            |107            |99             |105            |113            |116            |124            |134                            

Middle earner   |107            |110            |118            |126            |141            |153            |165            |149            |161            |176            |181            |198            |216                            

High earner     |124            |133            |143            |156            |173            |189            |208            |183            |201            |222            |225            |249            |276                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

20  Low earner  |75             |76             |79             |83             |90             |94             |99             |93             |98             |104            |107            |114            |121                            

Middle earner   |105            |106            |111            |117            |132            |140            |149            |138            |147            |157            |165            |177            |190                            

High earner     |124            |129            |136            |145            |162            |173            |186            |171            |183            |197            |205            |221            |240                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

30  Low earner  |68             |65             |66             |68             |72             |74             |75             |74             |76             |78             |82             |84             |87                             

Middle earner   |94             |88             |90             |93             |105            |109            |113            |109            |114            |118            |127            |133            |139                            

High earner     |113            |104            |107            |110            |125            |130            |134            |131            |135            |141            |153            |159            |166                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

40  Low earner  |60             |55             |56             |56             |60             |60             |61             |61             |61             |62             |65             |66             |67                             

Middle earner   |86             |75             |76             |77             |85             |87             |89             |88             |90             |92             |99             |101            |103                            

High earner     |103            |86             |88             |89             |101            |103            |105            |105            |107            |110            |120            |123            |127                            

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

DEFENCE

Relocation

Mr. Brandon-Bravo : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will meet executives of Nottingham development enterprise to discuss the relocation of parts of his Department to Nottingham as part of the policy on the relocation of such posts away from the south-east.

Mr. Sainsbury : Under the policy that my right hon. Friend the Paymaster General, announced on 31 March 1988, my Department is now reviewing the location of its work with a view to finding sites offering easier labour markets, value for money and increased operational efficiency. Where appropriate, areas that are the focus of the Government's regional and urban policies, such as Nottingham, will be considered. My officials will be consulting local representatives in relevant sites as appropriate.

Information Technology

Mr. Atkinson : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement of progress on the introduction of information technologies to facilitate internal communications in his Department and the provision of information to the public concerning those areas for which he is responsible ; and if he has any further plans to apply the newest technologies in these fields.

Mr. Sainsbury : Within the departmental planning processes we are continually reviewing how information technology can assist in improving efficiency and effectiveness, including in the field of communications.


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We have an extensive modernisation programme for voice and data communications. Videotext, CCTV, facsimile transmission and electronic mail are all being exploited, with a substantial increase foreseen for the latter if trials presently under way prove successful. Growing use is being made of technology-based training ; and computer-based publishing systems play a significant part in text production of all kinds. For the future we will continue to take up relevant available technology as it matures and offers economical and effective ways of meeting our needs.

YTS (Germany)

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what factors he took into account in deciding not to establish a YTS centre in Germany ; if he is intending to open YTS centres in any other country where British forces and their families are stationed ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Sainsbury : The wide geographical spread of British forces and their dependants in Germany meant that it was inappropriate to establish one YTS training centre. Eleven YTS areas have been established to coincide with major garrison areas and "on" and "off" job YTS training is carried out within existing service establishments, service education centres and in one Service Children's Education Authority school. It is not intended to establish dedicated YTS centres in any other country.

Defence Budgets

Mr. Salmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish what information he has regarding the defence budgets of all Organisation for Economic


Column 581

Co-operation and Development member states ; and if he will show for each their defence budgets (a) as a percentage of gross domestic product, (b) as a percentage of total Government expenditure and (c) in pound sterling.

Mr. Archie Hamilton : The Department does not hold information on Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development member states which are not members of NATO. For NATO nations, the information requested at (a) and (c) is given in the following table. The information requested at (b) is not reported by member nations to NATO and is therefore not readily available.


Country                     |Defence expenditure as  |Defence expenditure in £                         

                            |percentage of gross     |million sterling                                 

                            |domestic product                                                          

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

United States of America    |6.1                     |162,381                                          

France                      |3.8                     |20,181                                           

Federal Republic of Germany |3.0                     |19,877                                           

United Kingdom              |4.3                     |19,621                                           

Italy                       |2.4                     |10,761                                           

Canada                      |2.1                     |5,567                                            

Netherlands                 |3.0                     |3,790                                            

Spain                       |2.2                     |4,113                                            

Belgium                     |2.9                     |2,369                                            

Greece                      |6.6                     |1,947                                            

Turkey                      |4.2                     |1,426                                            

Norway                      |3.3                     |1,640                                            

Denmark                     |2.2                     |1,313                                            

Portugal                    |3.1                     |709                                              

Luxembourg                  |1.3                     |46                                               

Note:These figures, which are provisional, have been compiled for the calendar year 1988 from NATO     

sources except those for the United Kingdom, which have been compiled from national sources. Defence   

expenditure is given in £ million sterling at 1988 average market exchange rates, which do not         

necessarily reflect the relative purchasing power of individual currencies and so are not a complete   

guide to comparative resource allocation.                                                              

NORTHERN IRELAND

IRA (Funding)

88. Mr. Butler : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what progress has been made on international co-operation on reducing overseas funding of the IRA.

Mr. Ian Stewart : The Government are well aware of the need for close international co-operation against all forms of terrorism and are consistently active in promoting such co-operation. In particular, there are provisions in the Prevention of Terrorism (Temporary Provisions) Bill currently before Parliament for bilateral agreements with other countries to make reciprocal arrangements which


Column 582

would allow for the enforcement of orders made abroad to restrain or forfeit terrorist funds. We will be encouraging countries with similar legislation to enter into such agreements.

My right hon. Friend the Home Secretary has already outlined the Government's proposals to EC colleagues in the Trevi forum and has agreed that these should form the basis of a study into ways of dealing with terrorist finances. The possibility of having reciprocal enforcement arrangements will be pursued actively once Parliament has agreed to the new provisions.

Lead-free Petrol

Mr. Beggs : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many outlets for the sale of lead-free petrol there are in Northern Ireland at present ; and what steps he is taking to increase the rates at which petrol retail outlets are providing motorists with the opportunity to purchase lead-free petrol in Northern Ireland.

Mr. Needham : At present there are 91 filling stations throughout Northern Ireland selling lead-free petrol. As part of the Government's initiative to encourage the use of unleaded fuel, I shall be sponsoring a Northern Ireland lead-free petrol week during 20 to 25 March. The Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland will be promoting a range of events during the week involving the oil companies, car manufacturers, the motoring public and the media. Information packs including maps showing the location of lead-free petrol outlets will be distributed free to motorists.

Compensation

Mr. Beggs : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will publish by district council or housing area in Northern Ireland information on (a) the number of claims made for compensation for alleged personal injury in each of the last five years against the Northern Ireland Housing Executive and Department of Environment (Northern Ireland) Roads Service, (b) the amount of compensation paid by the Housing Executive and Roads Service Northern Ireland in each of the last five years and (c) the number of claims lodged for compensation against the Housing Executive and Road Service which have still to be settled.

Mr. Needham : The chairman of the Northern Ireland Housing Executive has advised me that the information sought about the number of claims made against the Housing Executive for compensation for alleged personal injury and the number outstanding, is not available in the form requested for the last five years. For 1983-84 and 1984-85 the information available is :


Column 581


                         Claims made                                                             Claims outstanding                                                     

                        |Total                  |Personal injury        |Total compensation paid|Total                  |Personal injury                                

                                                                        |in each year £000's                                                                            

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1983-84                 |2,674                  |1,399                  |704                    |260                    |147                                            

1984-85                 |3,052                  |1,806                  |961                    |382                    |252                                            


For 1985-86 to 1987-88 the information available in respect of the total numbers of claims and compensation is :


Column 583


                    1985-86                         1986-87                         1987-88                         Claims outstanding                             

                    Claims made                     Claims made                     Claims made                     at 31 December 1988                            

Region/district    |Total          |Personal injury|Total          |Personal injury|Total          |Personal injury|Total          |Personal injury                

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Headquarters       |-              |-              |1              |-              |3              |-              |-              |-                              

Belfast 1          |176            |127            |165            |148            |141            |114            |250            |207                            

2                  |81             |49             |121            |82             |102            |66             |178            |126                            

3                  |397            |308            |436            |363            |383            |267            |734            |560                            

4                  |212            |170            |233            |191            |232            |165            |456            |351                            

5                  |175            |109            |197            |152            |195            |143            |346            |270                            

6                  |172            |114            |180            |133            |185            |139            |341            |260                            

7                  |139            |87             |120            |85             |113            |71             |225            |163                            

                                                                                                                                                                   

South East                                                                                                                                                         

Bangor             |23             |15             |22             |15             |26             |18             |37             |29                             

Newtownards I      |23             |15             |27             |14             |26             |18             |45             |27                             

Newtownards II     |10             |9              |15             |6              |21             |10             |28             |14                             

Castlereagh I      |47             |23             |51             |27             |97             |31             |126            |52                             

Castlereagh II     |14             |10             |17             |9              |20             |13             |31             |21                             

Lisburn I          |59             |29             |83             |47             |73             |37             |89             |44                             

Lisburn II         |19             |16             |25             |12             |31             |16             |43             |25                             

Lisburn III        |144            |111            |128            |110            |125            |93             |219            |174                            

Downpatrick        |80             |27             |90             |30             |68             |34             |130            |59                             

                                                                                                                                                                   

South                                                                                                                                                              

Banbridge          |33             |23             |34             |21             |35             |15             |53             |29                             

Newry I            |90             |36             |109            |52             |104            |60             |150            |64                             

Newry II           |26             |12             |34             |23             |22             |8              |44             |26                             

Kilkeel            |7              |2              |8              |1              |9              |2              |9              |2                              

Armagh             |26             |16             |34             |15             |41             |23             |63             |40                             

Craigavon          |89             |65             |128            |89             |72             |53             |132            |85                             

Lurgan             |66             |46             |65             |41             |57             |38             |90             |59                             

Portadown          |35             |13             |36             |18             |34             |19             |63             |34                             

                                                                                                                                                                   

North East                                                                                                                                                         

Ballymena          |56             |12             |51             |19             |54             |20             |90             |38                             

Antrim             |52             |24             |44             |24             |66             |31             |84             |39                             

Newtownabbey I     |79             |57             |153            |115            |127            |111            |213            |166                            

Newtownabbey II    |59             |19             |70             |34             |55             |24             |99             |52                             

Carrickfergus      |22             |10             |24             |12             |27             |13             |40             |21                             

Larne              |24             |6              |30             |18             |20             |6              |38             |18                             

Ballycastle        |8              |1              |7              |1              |8              |4              |12             |5                              

Ballymoney         |19             |3              |9              |3              |7              |-              |13             |4                              

                                                                                                                                                                   

North West                                                                                                                                                         

Londonderry I      |340            |267            |344            |275            |242            |187            |533            |424                            

Londonderry II     |123            |71             |119            |68             |81             |39             |220            |119                            

Londonderry III    |122            |101            |174            |132            |163            |131            |315            |238                            

Limavady           |23             |9              |24             |14             |28             |8              |53             |19                             

Coleraine          |51             |14             |43             |20             |69             |22             |111            |41                             

Magherafelt        |22             |11             |19             |8              |34             |8              |55             |17                             

Strabane           |36             |23             |23             |15             |33             |18             |62             |39                             

                                                                                                                                                                   

West                                                                                                                                                               

Omagh              |47             |18             |39             |17             |47             |19             |90             |32                             

Cookstown          |48             |12             |32             |19             |45             |16             |75             |31                             

Dungannon          |65             |41             |82             |50             |70             |37             |137            |72                             

Enniskillen        |26             |11             |29             |9              |29             |9              |54             |16                             

                   |-------        |-------        |-------        |-------        |-------        |-------        |-------        |-------                        

Totals             |3,365          |2,142          |3,675          |2,537          |3,420          |2,156          |6,186          |4,136                          

                                                                                                                                                                   

Total compensation                                                                                                                                                 

paid in each year   £1,335,822                      £1,485,496                      £1,403,904                                                                     

Note: The claims figures relate to the year in which the incident took place and are the numbers received by 31 December 1988.                                     


Column 585


|c|Compensation claims made against the roads service of the Department of the Environment Northern Ireland are handled on a roads division basis. The information|c|                                                                                                                                                   

|c|in respect of the total number of claims and compensation is:|c|                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                         1983-84                                         1984-85                                         1985-86                                         1986-87                                         1987-88                                                                                        

                        |Claims                 |Compensation paid      |Claims                 |Compensation paid      |Claims                 |Compensation paid      |Claims                 |Compensation paid      |Claims                 |Compensation paid      |Claims still to be                             

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        |settled at 31March 1989                        

                        |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                 |£'000s                                                                 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ballymena               |240                    |71                     |266                    |135                    |316                    |127                    |339                    |180                    |348                    |155                    |235                                            

Belfast                 |1,890                  |1,199                  |1979                   |2,004                  |2,594                  |2,231                  |2,920                  |2,847                  |2,855                  |2,806                  |4,616                                          

Coleraine               |458                    |198                    |509                    |245                    |780                    |397                    |969                    |534                    |824                    |734                    |450                                            

Craigavon               |418                    |397                    |492                    |387                    |599                    |657                    |651                    |506                    |695                    |694                    |523                                            

Downpatrick             |518                    |324                    |570                    |465                    |667                    |440                    |726                    |533                    |831                    |655                    |547                                            

Omagh                   |327                    |123                    |409                    |301                    |433                    |279                    |488                    |421                    |1,500                  |373                    |490                                            

Whiteabbey Girls Training School

Mr. Beggs : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when the former Whiteabbey girls training school property at Old Manse road, Newtownabbey, which is now the subject of a planning application No. 0175 by the Northern Ireland fire authority, was transferred or sold to the authority by the Department of Environment (NI) ; whether the legal matters involved in the transaction have been completed ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Needham [holding answer 6 March 1989] : This property is owned by the Secretary of State for the Environment. It has not yet been sold to the Fire authority for Northern Ireland. Final completion of the sale awaits the outcome of the authority's planning application for a fire brigade training school. The Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland will shortly re-consult the Newtownabbey borough council as to its opinion on the planning application, following which the Department will then issue its planning decision.

HEALTH

AIDS

Mr. Rost : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what information he has on accuracy on the assay system currently most commonly used to identify people as HIV antibody positive ; and what steps he has taken to ensure that there are no more prospects of people being identified as HIV antibody positive who were subsequently found not to be so ;


Column 586

(2) what checks exist to determine whether people who test first positive and subsequently negative for the presence of HIV antibodies have been subject to inaccurate test procedures or have been able to disable and eliminate the HIV from their systems.


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