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TRADE AND INDUSTRY

Post Office Savings Bank (Savings Limit)

Mrs. Peacock : To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what steps he is taking to monitor the new rules concerning the Post Office savings bank, particularly the new limit of £5 savings ; what representations he has received on the effect of the rules on children and pensioners saving small amounts of money ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Lilley [holding answer 22 May 1989] : I have been asked to reply.

National savings monitors the performance of all national savings products. The increase from £1 to £5 in the minimum for deposits into the National savings ordinary account from 1 January 1989 has reduced the number of deposits transactions by around 20 per cent. So the measure has achieved its aim of reducing the number of very small deposits, which are as expensive to process as larger deposits. Since Girobank and other financial institutions provide a wide range of savings facilities for very small amounts of savings, I am satisfied that this change has not had a negative effect on children and pensioners.

Representations have been received from many hon. Members and from the members of the public to whom I have explained the reasons for the change.

ATTORNEY-GENERAL

Immigration Appeals

Mr. Goodlad : To ask the Attorney-General what was the total number of appeals against refusal of asylum heard by the immigration appellate authorities in each of the last three years.

The Attorney-General : I refer my hon. Friend to the reply that I gave to the hon. Member for Edinburgh, Central (Mr. Darling) on 19 May at column 321.

Social Security Commissioners

Mr. Gareth Wardell : To ask the Attorney-General how many people resident in (a) England, (b) Scotland, (c) Wales and (d) Northern Ireland have appeared before a social security commissioner in each of the past five years ; and if he will separately distinguish the location where those hearings were held.

The Attorney-General : The numbers of cases heard by social security commissioners in each of the past five years are listed in the tables, broken down according to the location of the hearings. The breakdown of individual residential locations requested is not reasonably practicable.


England, Wales and Scotland                                        

Number of cases heard by Social Security Commissioner in each of   

the past five years                                                

Location     |1984    |1985    |1986    |1987    |1988             

-------------------------------------------------------------------

London       |na      |na      |519     |572     |222              

Cardiff      |na      |na      |6       |42      |56               

Liverpool<1> |nil     |nil     |nil     |nil     |53               

Edinburgh    |56      |51      |64      |68      |63               

na=Figures not available.                                          

<1>Hearings have only been held at this location since 1988.       


Column 567


Northern Ireland                                                  

Number of cases heard by Social Security Commissioner in each of  

the past five years                                               

Location    |1984    |1985    |1986    |1987    |1988             

------------------------------------------------------------------

Belfast     |74      |89      |76      |47      |33               

Armagh      |7       |19      |10      |12      |3                

Ballymena   |nil     |8       |5       |3       |2                

Ballymoney  |nil     |nil     |2       |2       |nil              

Banbridge   |nil     |32      |18      |6       |22               

Coleraine   |6       |6       |2       |2       |2                

Cookstown   |12      |6       |4       |nil     |3                

Craigavon   |nil     |1       |3       |4       |2                

Downpatrick |nil     |5       |5       |4       |nil              

Dungannon   |nil     |11      |9       |nil     |nil              

Enniskillen |4       |8       |3       |nil     |3                

Limavady    |7       |4       |7       |2       |3                

Londonderry |10      |7       |3       |8       |5                

Magherafelt |1       |14      |6       |4       |nil              

Newry       |13      |17      |6       |16      |8                

Omagh       |17      |12      |21      |11      |7                

Strabane    |4       |13      |11      |6       |6                

            |---     |---     |---     |---     |---              

  Totals    |155     |252     |191     |127     |99               


Column 568

EMPLOYMENT

Availability for Work

Ms. Short : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list from the 1988 labour force survey, by region, including Greater London and by male and female, the numbers of people who were (a) without jobs and who looked for work in the four weeks before their LFS interview and were available to start work within two weeks, who wanted full-time jobs, the number who wanted part-time jobs and the number who had no preference (b) unemployed according to the standard LFS definition who were looking for full-time jobs and the number looking for part-time jobs and the number who had no preference, (c) in part-time jobs who were looking for a different job with longer hours or looking for an additional job, (d) looking for a different job with shorter hours, (e) claimants not unemployed by the definition using broad ILO guidelines on the grounds that they were employed, and (f) claimants not unemployed by the conventional LFS definition on the grounds that they were employed.

Mr. Lee : Available estimates from the preliminary results of the 1988 labour force survey are shown in the following tables :


Column 567


Table 1                                                                            

ILO/OECD unemployed<1> looking for work as an employee<2> and wanting a full or    

part-time job or having no preference                                              

Spring 1988, Thousands                                                             

                            Full-time       Part-time       No Preference          

                           |Males  |Females|Males  |Females|Males  |Females        

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Great Britain              |912    |333    |66     |403    |95     |120            

Northern                   |87     |30     |<3>    |26     |<3>    |10             

Yorkshire and Humberside   |110    |31     |<3>    |40     |13     |13             

East Midlands              |53     |19     |<3>    |30     |<3>    |<3>            

East Anglia                |16     |<3>    |<3>    |12     |<3>    |<3>            

South East                 |163    |80     |19     |104    |13     |22             

  of which: Greater London |89     |40     |10     |44     |<3>    |10             

South West                 |40     |17     |<3>    |31     |<3>    |<3>            

West Midlands              |90     |33     |<3>    |42     |<3>    |12             

North West                 |151    |49     |11     |52     |20     |21             

Wales                      |57     |17     |<3>    |22     |<3>    |<3>            

Scotland                   |141    |48     |<3>    |44     |11     |14             

<1> People without a job who were available for work and had either looked for     

work at some time in the last four weeks or were waiting to start a job they had   

already obtained.                                                                  

<2> People looking for work as self-employed were not asked if they would prefer   

to work full or part-time.                                                         

<3> Sample size too small for a reliable estimate.                                 

Source: 1988 Labour Force Survey, Preliminary results.                             


Table 2                                              

Unemployed<1> persons looking for work as an         

employee<2> and wanting a full or part-time job or   

having no preference                                 

Spring 1988, Thousands                               

-----------------------------------------------------

Great Britain            |907|334|60 |369|95 |121    

Northern                 |88 |30 |<3>|28 |10 |<3>    

Yorkshire and Humberside |110|31 |<3>|36 |12 |14     

East Midlands            |53 |20 |<3>|30 |<3>|<3>    

East Anglia              |16 |<3>|<3>|12 |<3>|<3>    

South East               |166|80 |19 |97 |14 |22     

of which: Greater London |91 |40 |11 |42 |<3>|10     

South West               |38 |17 |<3>|28 |<3>|<3>    

West Midlands            |89 |32 |<3>|31 |10 |11     

North West               |148|52 |<3>|48 |18 |23     

Wales                    |57 |18 |<3>|21 |<3>|<3>    

Scotland                 |141|46 |<3>|38 |10 |14     

<1> Great Britain labour force definition.           

<2> People looking for work as self-employed were    

not asked if they would prefer to work full or       

part-time.                                           

<3> Sample size too small for a reliable estimate.   

Source: 1988 Labour Force Survey, Preliminary        

results.                                             


Table 3                                            

Persons in employment in part-time jobs<1> looking 

for a different job                                

with longer hours or an additional job             

Spring 1988, Thousands                             

                           |Males  |Females        

---------------------------------------------------

Great Britain              |127    |225            

Northern                   |11     |17             

Yorkshire and Humberside   |14     |26             

East Midlands              |<2>    |18             

East Anglia                |<2>    |<2>            

South East                 |26     |60             

  of which: Greater London |11     |20             

South West                 |<2>    |15             

West Midlands              |<2>    |19             

North West                 |23     |28             

Wales                      |<2>    |14             

Scotland                   |14     |18             

<1> Based on the respondent's own assessment, not  

on the number of hours usually worked.             

<2> Sample size too small for a reliable estimate. 

Source: 1988 Labour Force Survey, Preliminary      

results.                                           


Table 4                               

Persons in employment in part-time    

jobs looking for a different job      

with shorter hours                    

Spring 1988. Thousands                

--------------------------------------

Great Britain             |240|123    

Northern                  |10 |<1>    

Yorkshire and Humberside  |23 |<1>    

East Midlands             |19 |11     

East Anglia               |<1>|<1>    

South East                |84 |49     

  of which Greater London |32 |21     

South West                |17 |<1>    

West Midlands             |23 |13     

North West                |27 |14     

Wales                     |<1>|<1>    

Scotland                  |19 |10     

<1> Sample size too small for a       

reliable estimate.                    

Source : 1988 Labour Force Survey, Preliminary results. It is estimated that there were some 100,000 male and 60,000 female claimants employed in Great Britain in Spring 1988. However, a reliable analysis of these figures by region is not available, mainly because of the sampling errors involved.

Job Introduction Scheme

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been made for grant aid under the job introduction scheme ; and how many have been awarded for each of the past five years.

Mr. Lee : The information requested about the number of applications made for grant aid under the job introduction scheme is not available. The numbers of grants authorised for each of the past five years were :


        |Number       

----------------------

1984-85 |2,033        

1985-86 |1,828        

1986-87 |1,460        

1987-88 |1,629        

1988-89 |2,091        


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Skill Shortages

Mr. Lester : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what review he has made of the effectiveness of industry training boards in tackling the level of skill shortages or training needs in their sectors ; and what were the results of the review for each training organisation.

Mr. Nicholls : The effectiveness of each industry training board is reviewed every three years at the time of reconstitution. Many industries covered by these boards continue to report skill shortages.

Mr. Lester : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what review he has undertaken of the effectiveness of non-statutory training organisations in tackling the level of skill shortages or training needs in their sectors ; and what were the results of the review for each training organisation.

Mr. Nicholls : The effectiveness of non-statutory training organisations was last reviewed during a Manpower Services Commission research study in 1987. The criteria used included monitoring and reviewing key skill requirements and training needs. The report showed that 56 were rated effective and a further 23 partially effective against the full range of the criteria. The report did not rank organisations against each criterion.

Non-statutory Training Organisations

Mr. Lester : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment in which areas the level of effectiveness of non-statutory training organisations has improved since production of the Manpower Services Commission study "The Full Fact Finding Study of the NSTO System".

Mr. Cope : There has been no overall study of the effectiveness of non-statutory training organisations since the Manpower Services Commission research report in 1987.

Mr. Lester : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many non-statutory training organisations currently meet the standards laid down in the Manpower Services Commission publication "The Effective NSTO" ; and what steps he is taking to secure compliance with those standards by the remaining non-statutory training organisations.

Mr. Cope : Since the Manpower Services Commission research report in 1987, many non-statutory training organisations have taken steps to improve their effectiveness. The Government continue to provide financial support to help effectiveness improvements in these organisations. "Employment for the 1990s" (Cm. 540) noted the Government's welcome for the establishment of the voluntary National Council for Industry Training Organisations, and the Training Agency is assisting the council in producing a code of practice for members. Further research will be commissioned in due course.

Mr. Lester : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the current level of resourcing and support to non-statutory training organisations from employers ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Cope : The majority of non-statutory training organisations command the support of the employers in


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their industries and have adequate resources to be effective in carrying forward the remits for industry-level training organisations set out in "Employment for the 1990s" (Cm 540). The Government continue to assist the less effective and new bodies.

Mr. Lester : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment, in the light of the finding of the Manpower Services Commission study "The Full Fact Finding Study of the NSTO System" that 79 per cent. of employers would not contribute more resources to training organisations, what steps he is taking to ensure that the industry-level training organisations proposed in the White Paper "Employment for the 1990s" will attract sufficient industry support.

Mr. Cope : The great majority of employers in Great Britain support vocational education and training for their employees ; a very small proportion of that support goes to finance the voluntary and independent non-statutory training organisations. All proposals for new organisations are required to detail the level of support being obtained from employers in the relevant industry.

Competent Persons (Prosecutions)

Mr. Strang : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many competent persons have been prosecuted in each year since 1965.

Mr. Nicholls : This information is not available.

Power Presses

Mr. Strang : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many injuries and deaths there have been at power presses for each year since the Power Presses Regulations were introduced in 1965.

Mr. Nicholls : Power presses are not separately identified in the Health and Safety Executive's current databases of reported injuries at work. Available information is taken from annual surveys which were discontinued after 1974, but comparable data was collected in 1979 and 1983. The results are shown in the table.


Column 572


Accidents at the     

Tools of Power       

Presses and Press    

Brakes<1>            

       |Number       

---------------------

1965   |441          

1966   |342          

1967   |230          

1968   |234          

1969   |245          

1970   |203          

1971   |159          

1972   |153          

1973   |152          

1974   |145          

                     

1979   |48           

1983   |27           

<1> Reportable       

injuries notified to 

Her Majesty's        

factory              

inspectorate;        

severity is not      

recorded.            

Mr. Strang : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many competent persons have been prosecuted in each year since 1965 in relation to the 1965 Power Presses Regulations and any other legislation relevant to power presses.

Mr. Nicholls : The information requested is not available. The HSE records do not specifically identify proceedings taken against competent persons.

Factory Inspectors

Mr. Strang : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what was the total number of factory inspectors employed by the Health and Safety Executive on 2 December 1987 ; how many were employed in each of the grades of inspector II, inspector 1B, inspector 1A, deputy superintending inspector, superintending inspector, area director, senior area director, deputy chief inspector and chief inspector, respectively ; what are the latest totals in each of these categories ; and how many in each of the categories for both dates were in the field.

Mr. Nicholls : The breakdown by grade of number of factory inspectors employed in HSE is as follows. Staffing figures are recorded on the first of each month.


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                          1 December 1987                               1 May 1989                                                          

Grade                    |Number                |(of which in the field|Number                |(of which in the field                       

                                                |force)                                       |force)                                       

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chief Inspector          |1                     |(-)                   |1                     |(-)                                          

Deputy Chief Inspector   |6                     |1                     |4                     |(-)                                          

Senior Area Director     |2                     |(1)                   |4                     |(2)                                          

Area Director            |18                    |(18)                  |17                    |(17)                                         

Superintending Inspector |3                     |(-)                   |3                     |(-)                                          

Deputy Superintending Inspector  44              (25)                   38                     (24)                                         

Inspector 1A             |159                   |(123)                 |165.5                 |(124.5)                                      

Inspector 1B             |283                   |(268)                 |276.5                 |(263.5)                                      

Inspector 1I             |95                    |(95)                  |102                   |(102)                                        

                         |----                  |----                  |----                  |----                                         

Total                    |611                   |(531)                 |611                   |(533)                                        

Following the latest in a series of recruitment competitions, a number of successful candidates have been or will be offered employment as factory inspectors. A further recruitment competition is currently under way.


Column 572

Agriculture Inspectors

Mr. Strang : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what was the total number of agricultural inspectors employed by the Health and Safety Executive on 2 December 1987 ; how many were employed in each of the grades of assistant inspector, inspector, principal inspector, principal inspector 1, deputy superintending inspector, deputy chief inspector and chief inspector,


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respectively ; what are the latest totals in each of these categories ; and how many in each of the categories for both dates were in the field.


Column 574

Mr. Nicholls : The breakdown by grade of the number of agricultural inspectors employed in HSE is as follows. Staffing figures are recorded on the first of each month.


Column 573


                                 1 December 1987                               1 May 1989                                                          

Grade                           |Number                |(of which in the field|Number                |(of which in the field                       

                                                       |force)                                       |force)                                       

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chief Inspctor                  |1                     |(-)                   |1                     |(-)                                          

Deputy Chief Inspector          |2                     |(-)                   |2                     |(-)                                          

Deputy Superintending Inspector |3                     |(3)                   |3                     |(3)                                          

Principal Inspector 1           |7                     |(6)                   |6                     |(5)                                          

Principal Inspector             |29                    |(24)                  |28                    |(23)                                         

Inspector                       |91                    |(80)                  |100                   |(86)                                         

Assistant Inspector             |25                    |(25)                  |26                    |(26)                                         

                                |--                    |--                    |--                    |--                                           

Total                           |158                   |(138)                 |16                    |(143)                                        

A recruitment competition is currently under way.

Construction (Safety)

Mr. Meacher : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will investigate the reasons for the differences in death, serious injury and ill-health rates on construction sites with the highest and lowest rates.

Mr. Nicholls : The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) does not record fatal accident, serious injury or ill-health rates for individual construction sites and, therefore, the sites with the highest and lowest rates cannot be identified.

However, the "Blackspot Construction" report published by the HSE in June 1988 analysed the circumstances of 739 deaths in the construction industry between 1981 and 1985 and showed that 70 per cent. could have been avoided by positive management action.

Mr. Meacher : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will publish in the Official Report provisional figures for 1988-89 giving (a) the number of fatalities and (b) the number of major injuries (i) in the London region and (ii) nationally for the construction industry.

Mr. Nicholls : Figures for 1988-89 are in the process of compilation but are not yet available.

Mr. Meacher : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what assessment he has made of the reasons why death and serious injuries in local authority direct labour buiding works are lower than in private industry.

Mr. Nicholls : Comparisons of the kind the hon. Member has in mind would be meaningless, even if reliable and comprehensive figures were available, since the work performed by organisations of different types and size in the construction industry differs substantially.

Mr. Meacher : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if, pursuant to his statement in the House on 11 April, Official Report , columns 833-34, on the correlation between firms with good safety standards and those that are successful, he will publish in the Official Report the names of the successful companies giving examples of their good safety record and stating whether the companies recognise trade unions.

Mr. Nicholls : The information requested is not available. As I pointed out in my statement to the House on 11 April, the correlation between good safety standards and other positive aspects of firms' performance is based on the experience and observations of HSE inspectors.


Column 574

Release for Training Scheme

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been made for grant aid for the release for training scheme ; and how many have been awarded for each of the past five years.

Mr. Nicholls : This information is not available.

Personal Reader Service Scheme

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been made for grant aid under the personal leader service scheme, and how many have been awarded for each of the past five years.

Mr. Lee : I take it that the hon. Member's question refers to my Department's personal reader service scheme.

Information about the number of applications made for grant aid under this scheme for the last five years is not available. The number of new beneficiaries receiving grants in each of the last five years was as follows :


        |Number       

----------------------

1984-85 |75           

1985-86 |80           

1986-87 |62           

1987-88 |107          

1988-89 |116          

Employment (Special Aids)

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been awarded for grant aid for the special aids to employment ; and how many have been awarded for each of the past five years.

Mr. Lee : The information requested about the number of applications made for grant aid under the special aids to employment scheme is not available. The numbers of grants authorised for each of the past five years were :


        |Number       

----------------------

1984-85 |1,640        

1985-86 |2,386        

1986-87 |2,630        

1987-88 |3,041        

1988-89 |4,242        


Column 575

Fares to Work Scheme

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been made for grant aid under the fares to work scheme ; and how many have been awarded for each of the last five years.

Mr. Lee : The information requested about the number of applications made for grant aid under the assistance with fares to work scheme is not available. The numbers of grants authorised for each of the past five years were :


        |Number       

----------------------

1984-85 |390          

1985-86 |434          

1986-87 |536          

1987-88 |553          

1988-89 |617          

Adaptations to Premises and Equipment

47. Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many applications have been made for grant aid under the adaptations to premises and equipment scheme ; and how many have been awarded for each of the past five years.

Mr. Lee : The information requested about the number of applications made for grant aid under the adaptations to premises and equipment scheme, is not available. The numbers of grants authorised for each of the past five years were :


        |Number       

----------------------

1984-85 |145          

1985-86 |165          

1986-87 |253          

1987-88 |252          

1988-89 |247          

Disabled People

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what conclusions the internal review on the employment practices for disabled persons has reached on altering or retaining the quota system ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Lee : Consideration of the issues being examined in the internal review of my Department's services for people with disabilities has not yet been completed. The review will be completed and the results published as soon as possible.

Disabled Workers (Quotas)

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the total number of permits issued exempting employers from the quota obligations under the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944, for each of the past five years.

Mr. Lee : The table gives information about the number of employers issued with permits some of whom may have received more than one permit during the years shown.


Column 576


Number of Employers  

who were below quota 

on 1 June but who    

had                  

been granted bulk    

permits during the   

previous 12 months   

       |Number       

---------------------

1984   |18,769       

1985   |18,681       

1986   |18,840       

1987   |18,577       

1988   |18,594       

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the total number of bulk permits issued exempting employers from the quota obligations under the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944, for each of the past five years.

Mr. Lee : The table gives information about the number of employers issued with bulk permits (some of whom may have received more than one permit) during the years shown.


Number of Employers  

who were below quota 

on 1 June but who    

had                  

been granted bulk    

permits during the   

previous 12 months   

       |Number       

---------------------

1984   |18,300       

1985   |18,486       

1986   |18,683       

1987   |18,480       

1988   |18,331       

Employment Rehabilitation Centres

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the total amount spent on employment rehabilitation centres for each of the last five years.

Mr. Lee : The total expenditure for the employment rehabilitation service (which includes employment rehabilitation centres) was as follows :


           |£ million          

-------------------------------

<1>1988-89 |20                 

1987-88    |23                 

1986-87    |22                 

1985-86    |20                 

1984-85    |20                 

<1> Provisional figure.        

Disabled Workers

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many prosecutions have been instigated for contravention of the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944 for each of the past five years ; and what has been the total amount paid in fines.

Mr. Lee : There have been no prosecutions under the Disabled Persons (Employment) Act 1944 in the last five years.

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what publicity initiatives have been taken by his Department regarding the uptake of grants by employers for the employment of disabled persons, for the last three years ; and what has been the total expenditure.

Mr. Lee : Publicity initiatives about schemes and services for the employment of disabled people during the


Column 577

last three years have included ongoing promotion of the code of good practice on the employment of disabled people and the associated videos "It Worked Fine" and "It Can Be Done". In 1988 a new series of leaflets for employers and people with disabilities was introduced. In 1989, additional leaflets about specific disabilities, the disablement resettlement officer service and jobhunting for people with disabilities were provided. Publicity material is displayed at appropriate conferences, exhibitions and so on. The Disablement Advisory Service provides information about such schemes and services as part of its advisory role to employers. The total expenditure for the three years was approximately £651,500, excluding staff costs which are not separately identifiable.

Mr. Wareing : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many people with disabilities are employed by his Department (a) as a total number, and (b) as a percentage of the total work force.

Mr. Lee : The Employment Department group employs 1,502 registered disabled staff ; they represent 2.5 per cent. of permanent staff in the group. In addition, the group employs a number of other people with disabilities who choose not to register.

Labour Statistics

Mr. McLeish : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what was the total number of part-time female employees in employment in Scotland and for each of the years June 1979 to June 1988 ; (2) what was the total number of part-time male employees in employment in Scotland for each of the years June 1979 to June 1988 ;

(3) what was the total number of full-time male employees in employment in Scotland for each of the years June 1979 to June 1988 ;


Column 578

(4) what was the total number of full-time female employees in employment in Scotland for each of the years June 1979 to June 1988.

Mr. Lang [holding answer 19 May 1989] : I have been asked to reply.

The available information is shown in the table. Estimates of the number of part-time male employees are not available for each year, but the censuses of employment record some 0.06 million male part-time employees in employment for each of the years 1978, 1981 and 1984.


Employees in employment in Scotland (thousands)   

Year (at JuMales all Females                      

                    |full-time|part-time          

--------------------------------------------------

1979      |1,205.2  |565.2    |331.9              

1980      |1,186.3  |561.2    |334.7              

1981      |1,127.8  |537.7    |336.3              

1982      |1,090.2  |522.7    |337.3              

1983      |1,060.4  |501.4    |337.3              

1984      |1,043.3  |510.7    |347.2              

1985      |1,039.4  |502.3    |362.1              

1986      |1,021.3  |501.1    |364.8              

1987      |1,009.5  |504.0    |378.4              

1988      |1,020.5  |525.8    |382.6              

Notes:                                            

(1) These estimates may be revised when the       

results of the 1987 Census of Employment become   

available.                                        

(2) Not adjusted for seasonal variation.          

Mr. McLeish : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the number of people in (a) full-time employment and (b) part-time employment, by sex, for each of the standard regions, for each of the years 1983 to 1988 based on the labour force survey.

Mr. Lee [holding answer 19 May 1989] : Estimates from labour force surveys are as shown in the table :


Column 577


                                1983        1984        1985        1986        1987        1988<4>          

                               |Men  |Women|Men  |Women|Men  |Women|Men  |Women|Men  |Women|Men  |Women      

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Employees and self employed<2>                                                                               

Full-time<3>                                                                                                 

Northern region                |672  |268  |662  |251  |661  |254  |658  |269  |671  |275  |671  |288        

Yorkshire and Humberside region 1,117 430   1,132 420   1,132 416   1,104 433   1,096 438   1,118 422        

East Midlands region           |954  |378  |949  |376  |935  |366  |965  |359  |954  |374  |980  |413        

East Anglia region             |470  |166  |494  |159  |490  |171  |489  |190  |499  |194  |520  |206        

South East region              |4,274|1,833|4,336|1,870|4,378|1,893|4,350|1,922|4,371|1,965|4,540|2,039      

of which Greater London        |1,665|840  |1,672|834  |1,696|832  |1,642|811  |1,637|846  |1,688|860        

South West region              |1,043|387  |1,048|388  |1,078|409  |1,068|410  |1,094|433  |1,103|456        

West Midlands region           |1,200|468  |1,191|482  |1,191|485  |1,212|509  |1,212|483  |1,299|511        

North West region              |1,412|609  |1,394|580  |1,426|618  |1,403|604  |1,412|631  |1,426|650        

Wales                          |587  |244  |598  |246  |593  |240  |584  |246  |575  |242  |598  |258        

                                                                                                             

Part-time<3>                                                                                                 

Northern region                |21   |221  |23   |242  |22   |235  |24   |249  |22   |258  |25   |251        

Yorkshire and Humberside region 34    397   47    415   48    420   45    430   58    442   53    438        

East Midlands region           |30   |283  |42   |320  |38   |327  |41   |359  |48   |337  |47   |341        

East Anglia region             |21   |162  |20   |173  |19   |170  |23   |167  |29   |175  |25   |205        

South East region              |167  |1,210|224  |1,368|223  |1,392|204  |1,392|231  |1,453|264  |1,472      

of which Greater London        |63   |422  |82   |446  |79   |486  |79   |473  |89   |485  |99   |470        

South West region              |45   |348  |51   |380  |58   |405  |58   |397  |69   |431  |81   |437        

West Midlands region           |36   |365  |37   |376  |48   |381  |53   |399  |53   |431  |58   |442        

North West region              |46   |453  |58   |491  |59   |493  |59   |507  |66   |495  |77   |530        

Wales                          |13   |164  |22   |184  |21   |192  |26   |204  |30   |196  |32   |204        

                                                                                                             

On Government employment and training programmes                                                             

Northern region                |16   |11   |16   |-<1> |19   |13   |23   |11   |30   |19   |31   |17         

Yorkshire and Humberside region 22    15    18    10    29    12    33    13    36    20    36    19         

East Midlands region           |14   |10   |16   |10   |20   |-<1> |21   |11   |24   |12   |25   |16         

East Anglia region             |-<1> |-<1> |-<1> |-<1> |10   |-<1> |-<1> |-<1> |-<1> |-<1> |12   |-<1>       

South East region              |47   |36   |36   |28   |40   |31   |45   |25   |45   |25   |49   |34         

  of which Greater London      |14   |11   |13   |-<1> |11   |12   |15   |12   |19   |-<1> |18   |14         

South West region              |17   |10   |16   |-<1> |17   |10   |22   |12   |17   |14   |27   |15         

West Midlands region           |20   |12   |20   |13   |34   |20   |36   |18   |38   |21   |29   |24         

North West region              |29   |20   |31   |20   |33   |19   |36   |13   |50   |29   |48   |27         

Wales                          |13   |-<1> |12   |-<1> |18   |-<1> |15   |-<1> |23   |14   |26   |11         

<1>Sample size too small for a reliable estimate.                                                            

<2>Full/part-split is only available for employees and self employed, not all persons on Government          

employment and training programmes are asked the appropriate question.                                       

<3>Based on respondent's own assessment.                                                                     

<4>Preliminary results (1988 only).                                                                          

Source:Labour Force Surveys.                                                                                 

Mr. McLeish : To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what was the number of people aged over 16 years who are (i) full-time employees, (ii) part-time employees, (iii) self-employed and (iv) on Government


Column 580

employment and training schemes, based on the labour force survey, in each of the standard regions and Wales, for each of the years 1983 to 1988.

Mr Lee : Estimates from labour force surveys are as shown in the following table.


Column 579


Full and part-time employees, self-employed and Government employment and training  

programmes, by region                                                               

Spring estimates   Thousands                                                        

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Full-time<1> employees                                                              

Northern region             |865    |830    |813    |832    |845    |852            

Yorks and Humberside region |1,395  |1,380  |1,360  |1,343  |1,335  |1,361          

East Midlands region        |1,188  |1,189  |1,160  |1,179  |1,159  |1,211          

East Anglia region          |556    |559    |563    |581    |588    |605            

South East region           |5,449  |5,462  |5,470  |5,465  |5,414  |5,623          

-of which Greater London    |2,250  |2,211  |2,205  |2,143  |2,127  |2,192          

South West region           |1,223  |1,199  |1,253  |1,230  |1,258  |1,269          

West Midlands region        |1,501  |1,490  |1,504  |1,548  |1,502  |1,573          

North West region           |1,808  |1,739  |1,803  |1,766  |1,790  |1,812          

Wales                       |722    |712    |716    |702    |706    |739            

                                                                                    

Part-time<1> employees                                                              

Northern region             |225    |249    |238    |256    |260    |260            

Yorks and Humberside region |405    |426    |424    |447    |459    |455            

East Midlands region        |290    |328    |337    |364    |346    |357            

East Anglia region          |165    |172    |169    |178    |179    |204            

South East region           |1,246  |1,409  |1,441  |1,416  |1,474  |1,529          

-of which Greater London    |443    |472    |504    |495    |505    |503            

South West region           |349    |377    |402    |396    |443    |459            

West Midlands region        |373    |381    |395    |421    |447    |453            

North West region           |469    |507    |508    |521    |515    |560            

Wales                       |163    |190    |195    |215    |204    |218            

                                                                                    

Self-employed                                                                       

Northern region             |92     |100    |121    |111    |121    |123            

Yorks and Humberside region |177    |207    |233    |223    |240    |235            

East Midlands region        |168    |172    |169    |181    |209    |213            

East Anglia region          |98     |116    |118    |109    |130    |146            

South East region           |790    |927    |975    |986    |1,131  |1,163          

-of which Greater London    |298    |352    |384    |368    |425    |423            

South West region           |251    |291    |296    |307    |324    |349            

West Midlands region        |195    |214    |207    |204    |230    |284            

North West region           |244    |276    |286    |286    |298    |310            

Wales                       |123    |148    |135    |143    |132    |135            

                                                                                    

On Government employment and training programmes                                    

Northern region             |27     |23     |33     |34     |48     |47             

Yorks and Humberside region |38     |28     |41     |46     |57     |55             

East Midlands region        |24     |25     |29     |32     |36     |42             

East Anglia region          |12     |11     |16     |10     |11     |17             

South East region           |83     |64     |71     |70     |71     |82             

-of which Greater London    |25     |22     |23     |27     |27     |33             

South West region           |27     |24     |27     |34     |31     |42             

West Midlands region        |32     |32     |54     |54     |59     |53             

North West region           |49     |51     |52     |50     |79     |74             

Wales                       |21     |19     |26     |23     |37     |36             

Source: Labour Force Surveys                                                        

<1>Based on respondent's own assessment                                             

<2>Preliminary results (1988 only)                                                  


Column 581


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