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Mr. McLoughlin : Security companies offer a wide range of services. The arrangements under which they perform those services are a matter between themselves and their clients. The fact that some of the tasks they are engaged to carry out may be performed wholly or partly at airports does not make those arrangements in general a matter for my right hon. Friend. However, under directions made by the Secretary of State under the Aviation Security Act 1982 airport managers and aircraft operators have various obligations in relation to aviation security. They may use their employees or agents to fulfil these obligations. It is a requirement of current directions that any security companies engaged for this purpose must be members of the British Security Industry Association or the International Professional Security Association. The


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Government will be responding in due course to the points made about this requirement by the Transport Select Committee in paragraph 56 of its recent report on airport security.

Mr. Parry : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what further steps he is taking to improve security at British airports ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. McLoughlin : We are determined to improve aviation security. The very full answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Wealden (Sir G. Johnson Smith) by my right hon. Friend the Member for Southend, West (Mr. Channon), the then Secretary of State, on 24 April at columns 448-50, announced a range of new initiatives. These are being followed through vigorously, and we shall not hesitate to take any further steps which may be necessary.

Underground Stations

Mr. Bowis : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what is the number of London Underground stations north of the River Thames and the number south of the River Thames ; and what plans are there to bring underground lines south of the river.

Mr. Portillo : There are 244 London Underground stations north of the River Thames and 29 south of the river. We are considering the extension of the Jubilee line via the south bank of the river to Canary wharf. An announcement on this will be made shortly.

East London Rail Study

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will place in the Library the full report of the east London rail study ; and when his Department will make the report publicly available.

Mr. Portillo : Halcrow Fox and Associates have prepared a fuller report on the east London rail study setting out the work which lay behind their summary report published in July. I have placed copies in the Library.

Road Congestion

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what his Department estimates for the budgets in terms of relief of road congestion in south and east London of the proposed new extension to the Jubilee line.

Mr. Portillo : This information is commercially confidential as it has a bearing on the negotiations with developers on their contributions to the Jubilee extension.

Thames Riverbus

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations he has received from the Thames riverbus partnership following the six months of operation of the partnership.

Mr. Portillo : I have received periodic reports from the Riverbus partnership.


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Underground Extensions

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations his Department has received from local authorities and others in support of proposals for underground line extensions in (a) Southwark and (b) docklands.

Mr. Portillo : The Department has received a number of representations in support of proposals for extensions of the underground in Southwark and docklands.

Jubilee Line

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what is the expected number of travellers on the proposed extension to the Jubilee Line (a) from Docklands westwards and (b) from west to Docklands in each of the first 10 years of operation.

Mr. Portillo : Forecasts have been made only for the morning peak three-hour period in 2001. The number of passengers predicted to use the line varies from link to link along its length. Between Green Park and Canary Wharf the number of people travelling daily eastward in the morning peak period is forecast to vary between 17,000 and 30, 300 and the number travelling westward between 8,000 and 32,100.

Mr. O'Brien : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) if he has information on the proposed extension of the Jubilee line to Greenwich ; if his Department is proposing to fund this extension ; and if he will make a statement ;

(2) what information he has on the extension of the Jubilee line into the London docklands ; if any private companies are considering contributing to this extension : and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Portillo : I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State in reply to a question from the hon. Member for Hendon, South (Mr. Marshall) today. LRT will shortly deposit a Bill for an extension of the Jubilee line prepared on the basis of an alignment via Brunswick (not Greenwich). But, I understand that it would be possible for the promoter to propose to Parliament that the route be changed during the consideration of the Bill. That could be proposed if sufficient contributions were forthcoming from those with an interest in the Greenwich alignment to offset the additional costs of that route.

Road Safety

Ms. Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what information he has relating to the total sums allocated, within the road safety budget 1990-91, specifically to benefit cyclists ; and if he will list the projects ;

(2) what information he has relating to the total sums allocated, within the road safety budget 1990-91, specifically to benefit pedestrians ; and if he will list the projects ;

(3) what information he has relating to the total sums being allocated to road safety projects for 1990-91 ; and if he will list the projects.


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Mr. Atkins : Road safety, including that of pedestrians and cyclists, is a key consideration in the road engineering and traffic management projects undertaken by my Department and the local authorities throughout Britain.

Many other agencies, including the police, education authorities, RoSPA and road user organisations also contribute significantly to road safety projects and initiatives. Associated with this work, a wide ranging programme of research and publicity will continue in 1990-91.

Because of the widespread nature of all these activities it is not possible to provide comprehensive information in the form requested.

British Rail

Mr. Pawsey : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what has been the level of subsidy for British Rail in each year since 1979 both in actual and real terms.

Mr. Portillo : The subsidy paid to British Rail in each year since 1979 as public service obligation grant under EC regulation 1191/69 and as level crossings grant under EEC regulation 1192/69 was as follows :


£ million                                                   

               |Cash          |1989-90 prices               

------------------------------------------------------------

1979           |516           |1,024                        

1980           |610           |1,021                        

1981           |814           |1,241                        

1982           |845           |1,204                        

1983           |870           |1,184                        

<1>1984        |843           |1,093                        

1985-86        |849           |1,044                        

1986-87        |755           |899                          

1987-88        |796           |901                          

1988-89        |556           |587                          

1989-90        |<2>517        |517                          

<1>1984-85 was a 15-month financial period. The figure      

shown for 1984 is the 12-month equivalent.                  

<2>PSO cash ceiling plus estimate for level crossings       

grant.                                                      

Mr. Pawsey : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information is maintained by his Department on British Rail's levels of punctuality.

Mr. Portillo : The Department receives information quarterly on the performance of each passenger sector against the quality objectives, including punctuality and, in addition, four-weekly reports for Network SouthEast and Provincial. British Rail reports formally on its performance against the quality of service objectives in its annual report and accounts.

Drowning, Ilfracombe

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport at what stage the police were informed about the incident in which Mark Woodward was drowned at Ilfracombe on 16 August.

Mr. McLoughlin : The police were informed at 16.44 local time.

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his reply of 31 October, Official Report, column 135, how far the lifeboat had to travel to respond to the incident at Ilfracombe in which Mark Woodward was drowned ; and whether this rate of response meets the criteria used by his Department to assess suitable response times.


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Mr. McLoughlin : From the launching slip to the location of the incident was a distance of approximately a quarter of a mile. To reach the launching slip the Ilfracombe lifeboat has to proceed by road from the boat house, also a distance of approximately a quarter of a mile. From advising the lifeboat launching authority to lifeboat on scene was 13 minutes.

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his reply of 31 October, Official Report, column 135, from which document he is quoting in his reference to reports of a person on the rocks, cut off by tide ; and whether this reference to a single person affected is confirmed by other sources.

Mr. McLoughlin : Two almost simultaneous reports, one direct, the other re-routed from Milford Haven, were received at Swansea. The first suggested two persons cut off by tide, the second indicated a single person. All references are recorded in coastguard logs.

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his reply of 31 October, Official Report, column 135, whether the times of 16.20, 16.24, 16.35 and 16.41 to which he refers are log times or electronic tape times.

Mr. McLoughlin : Log times.

Swansea Coastguard

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his reply of 31 October, Official Report , column 135 , if he will indicate for each of the five personnel on duty at the Swansea coastguard station (a) the number of hours worked in total that day and (b) the start and end times of shifts.

Mr. McLoughlin : The three regular coastguard officers each worked 12 hours from 0800 to 2000 and each had a meal break of 1 hours in this period. In addition, auxiliary coastguard staff worked the following hours : two auxiliaries 0700 to 1300, one auxiliary 1200 to 1800 covering meal breaks and two auxiliaries 1300 to 1900. At no time were there fewer than four staff on watch.

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what is the normal watch strength at the Swansea coastguard station ; what representations were made earlier this year to the district management about the watch strength ; and what action was taken, or is planned, as a result of these representations.

Mr. McLoughlin : The minimum watch level is three regular coastguard officers. However, the normal target is four regular officers on watch.

Staff representations regarding manning have been considered at district, regional and headquarters level. The present complement is considered adequate for the task.

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether any regular difficulties were experienced in maintaining the watch strength earlier this year at the Swansea coastguard station as a result of leave entitlement, training absences, sick leave, prior engagements, or the secondment of staff to other duties ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. McLoughlin : Some difficulty was experienced during July 1989 in maintaining the watch strength due to


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a spate of short-term sickness which coincided with previously arranged staff leave and training absences. On no occasion, however, did the watch strength fall below the minimum requirement of three regular officers on watch. On the few occasions when there was only the minimum regular watch strength, the fourth person on watch was provided by use of an auxiliary coastguard.

Coastguard

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what is the normal policy on informing the police when emergency calls are made to the coastguard.

Mr. McLoughlin : The police are informed immediately if their assistance is required. The nature of the incident dictates whether police involvement is necessary.

Ilfracombe Harbour

Mrs. Ann Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what is the policy of his Department on the making of payments to boats in Ilfracombe harbour to monitor emergency frequencies and to respond if required.

Mr. McLoughlin : No payments are made to vessels to monitor emergency frequencies. A master or person in charge of a vessel has an obligation, so far as he can do so without serious danger to his own vessel, her crew and passengers (if any), to render assistance on receiving a signal from any source that a ship, aircraft or person is in distress.

Scottish Airports Policy

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will call for research on noise number index contours around Glasgow airport relating to the impact of new transatlantic services and their interaction with European and shorthaul services before the consultation period on Scottish lowland airports policy closes.

Mr. McLoughlin : No. My right hon. Friend has responsibility for the mitigation of noise at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted airports. At other United Kingdom airports, including Glasgow, that responsibility lies with the airport operator.

Docklands Light Railway

Mr. O'Brien : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information he has on the proposal to extend the docklands light railway to Lewisham ; what assistance the Government are considering offering to this extension ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Portillo : London Regional Transport has submitted an appraisal of a southern extension of the docklands light railway to Greenwich and Lewisham and is still investigating possible sources of finance. Decisions on the funding of the project cannot therefore be taken at this stage.

Disabled People

Mr. Harry Greenway : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations he has received on behalf of disabled people on the difficulties they face in hailing and booking taxis ; and if he will make a statement.


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Mr. Atkins : The Department is in constant touch with disabled people and the organisations representing them.

Hailing and booking taxis has been a particular problem for wheelchair users. My Department was involved in the development of a wheelchair accessible London-type taxi. From 1 February this year all newly registered taxis in London have had to be wheelchair accessible and there are already 2,000 operating in the capital.

Disabled people are now able to state their requirements when pre-booking taxis through the booking agencies. At present a suitable vehicle cannot always be guaranteed. As the pool of wheelchair accessible taxis grows, wheelchair users will not only be able to pre-book taxis with greater certainty ; they will also be able to hail suitable vehicles in the street.

London Rail Studies

Mr. John Marshall : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what decisions he has taken on the major new lines proposed by the central and east London rail studies ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Parkinson : I am pleased to be able to give the go-ahead to the first major addition to London's Underground network since the Victoria line was approved, a quarter of a century ago.

The extension of the Jubilee line to docklands was recommended by the east London rail study. I am authorising LRT to deposit a Bill for this extension, which is to be routed from Green park via Westminster, Waterloo and London bridge, along the south bank of the Thames to Surrey docks, beneath the river again to Canary wharf on the Isle of Dogs, and thence via Canning Town to Stratford. This will greatly support regeneration of docklands ; it will relieve congestion on roads and the existing rail network including the docklands light railway ; and it will further strengthen public transport links with BR lines at Waterloo (including the new Channel tunnel terminal) and at London bridge. The new line will also much improve accessibility for areas south of the Thames in Southwark and Bermondsey and in London's east end in Tower Hamlets and Newham that are not now well served by public transport. I know how welcome this news will be in those areas.

The Jubilee extension will cost about £1 billion in today's prices to which developers will over time be making a cash contribution of over £400 million. I warmly welcome this contribution, which is of an unprecedented scale. This is a further example of public and private sector co-operation to the mutual benefit of both. The net cost to Government is approximately £40 million in 1990-91 and £150 million and £240 million in the following two years. My right hon. Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury has agreed that these sums should be made available from the public expenditure reserve which was set with this in mind.

The development of docklands is itself bound to ease pressure on transport and other services in central London. What is more, the central London rail study proposed a two-fold strategy to relieve congestion in the rail network serving the central area : a major upgrading programme to make the fullest possible use of the existing lines ; and the construction of two major new lines.

The major upgrading programme is already under way. I have approved record levels of investment by London


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Underground and Network SouthEast to enable them to improve services and increase capacity. The Central line is to be re-equipped with new signalling and 85 new trains ; a start is to be made on a similar upgrading of the Northern line ; major works are either in hand or being planned to increase capacity at the most congested underground stations including Angel, Victoria, Waterloo, London Bridge, Tottenham Court Road, Kings Cross and Holborn ; and, during the last 12 months we have approved nearly 1,200 new vehicles for Network SouthEast.

I welcome BR's proposals to develop their very successful Thameslink services, which at present carry through services from Luton and Bedford via King's Cross and Blackfriars to Brighton and other places south of London. Eighty more vehicles will be introduced next year, and the new St. Paul's Thameslink station will open in the spring. Off-peak services frequencies will increase next year. Provision of nearly £100 million has been made in the public expenditure settlement for the new trains and for design work and land acquisition principally at King's Cross for the next phase of development. The total project looks promising and the extra services would make a valuable contribution to the relief of congestion. BR hopes to be ready to seek legislative powers by November 1990. But I recognise that more must be done to meet longer-term requirements. Further work has been carried out since the central London rail study report was published in January this year. This has confirmed the view that, as well as the major upgradings now approved, additions to the network will be needed to relieve congestion in the central area as the London economy continues to grow over the rest of this century. Any one of the new lines under discussion would cost at least £1.5 billion to build at today's prices and would be a major engineering project affecting central London during its construction. For these reasons we are not currently planning to start on more than one new central area line, in addition to the Jubilee extension. Further work is necessary to decide which of the options offers the most practicable and cost-effective solution. In reaching this decision, my aim is to ensure that we select the line which will best serve the travelling public who will benefit from it and who will contribute to its costs through the fares they pay.

It is important that we make good progress in completing this further assessment. I have therefore instructed that it should be completed in time for a decision during next year on the path of a new line, on its timing and its funding. Subject to the satisfactory outcome of this further work, I would expect to authorise the introduction of a Bill in November 1990.

The upgrading of the present system, the Jubilee line extension, the improvements to Thameslink and a new line through central London would transform London's rail network over the next decade.

NORTHERN IRELAND

Correspondence

Mr. Pawsey : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what information his Department has on the length of time taken to respond to letters from hon. Members.


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Mr. Cope : The dates of receipt and of response to the majority of correspondence received from hon. Members by the Northern Ireland Office and Northern Ireland Departments is incorporated in the basic data for each item.

Integrated Schools

Mr. Alton : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what definition he intends to make of what constitutes an integrated school ; what provision he intends to make to secure balanced enrolment in an integrated school ; what provision for balance between both traditions in Northern Ireland he intends to provide on the governing bodies of integrated schools ; what representations he has received about the definition and appointment of foundation governors and schemes of management for schools which opt for grant-maintained integrated status ; and if he will make a statement.

Dr. Mawhinney : It is clearly inherent in the concept of integrated schooling that substantial numbers of Protestant and Roman Catholic pupils should be educated together. It is also vital that the management and ethos of an integrated school should be such as to ensure that parents perceive the school as guaranteeing equality of respect and treatment for all pupils regardless of their religious denomination. To require a balanced enrolment would, however, imply the enrolment of Protestants and Roman Catholics in roughly equal numbers. This would have the effect of denying integrated status to all but a few schools, defeating the Government's objective of enabling as many parents as possible to aspire to have their children educated with children from both traditions.

A distinctive constitution will be introduced for the board of governors of a grant-maintained integrated school. There will be two categories of directly appointed governors, namely, foundation governors and Department of Education appointees, together with two categories of elected governors, representing parents and teachers. For the Department's part, it will be required to choose persons committed to the viability of the school as an integrated school and it will seek to ensure that there is a broad balance of interests among those appointed.

Some representations have been made that, where an existing school with an integrated ethos acquired grant-maintained integrated status, the legislation should ensure that existing practice for the appointment of foundation governors and the existing provisions of its instrument of government should continue to apply. However, since integrated status will be available to a wide range of schools, with different constitutions, it would be inappropriate to seek to make detailed statutory provision for the definition and appointment of foundation governors or for schemes of management. The Government, nevertheless, fully intend that the transition to grant-maintained integrated status for a school should be made with the maximum degree of continuity consistent with its former status. In particular, it will be for the school governors themselves to draw up a scheme of management for the school for approval by the Department.

Security Fence (Newtownards)

Mr. John D. Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether he has given planning permission to the new security fence at Short Brothers'


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factory in Newtownards ; to how many adjoining landowners notices of the planning application were served ; and what provision he intends to make for access from Church street court to Half Acre lane to Corry street in Newtownards.

Mr. Needham : Planning permission was granted to Shorts plc in 1981 for, among other things, fencing at its Newtownards factory. This was before the introduction of the non-statutory neighbour notification scheme. The firm indicated to the DOE(NI) recently that it proposed to erect additional fencing and that a new planning application would be submitted. Both the new and original proposals showed a fence at either end of Forde street thus closing it off to both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. All rights-of-way through Forde street were extinguished by the NI Housing Executive in 1982 and the DOE(NI) has no plans to provide alternative access from Church street court.

Fire Service

Mr. Beggs : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what steps he will take to ensure that the application in respect of the Carrickfergus site for the fire authority is not delayed pending the outcome of the appeal in respect of the Newtownabbey site to which neighbours objected.

Mr. Needham : The Carrickfergus application was approved on 25 October 1989.

Mr. Roy Beggs : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland whether he is satisfied with progress made in respect of the planning application related to a site for the fire authority in Carrickfergus.

Mr. Needham : Yes, considering the complexity of the planning issues involved. The application was approved on 25 October 1989.

Chief Constable

Mr. John D. Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what restrictions on nationality apply to candidates for the post of Chief Constable of the Royal Ulster Constabulary.

Mr. Cope : To be eligible for appointment all police officers of any grade in the United Kingdom must be :

(a) a British citizen ; or

(b) a Commonwealth citizen (other than a British citizen) or a citizen of the Republic of Ireland, in which case one of the following conditions must be satisfied :

(i) at least one parent must be, or have been at death a Commonwealth citizen or a citizen of the Republic of Ireland ; or (

(ii) the candidate must have resided in a country or territory within the Commonwealth or in the Republic of Ireland, or have been employed elsewhere in the service of the Crown, or partly have so resided and partly been so employed, for at least five years out of the last eight years preceding the date of his appointment.

Education Reform

Mr. Ashdown : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) if he has met all of the bodies who submitted a response to the Education Reform (NI) Order 1989 ; what were the results of these meetings which have taken place ; and if he will make a statement ;


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(2) if he will list all the bodies who submitted a response to the Education Reform (NI) Order 1989 ; and if he will make a statement.

Dr. Mawhinney : I shall write to the hon. Member as soon as possible.

Cyprus

Mr. John D. Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when he last made an official visit to Cyprus ; and if he has any plans to visit Cyprus.

Mr. Brooke : I have not visited Cyprus as Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and I have no plans to do so.

Scheduled Offences

Mr. McNamara : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will give the number of persons convicted of scheduled offences in Northern Ireland, separately, for each calendar year since the commencement of the Emergency Provisions Act 1973.

Mr. Cope [holding answer 8 November 1989] : Information similar to that requested is published in the returns on the Emergency Provisions Act, but I will write to the hon. Member.

Industrial Development

Mr. Mallon : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will list those advanced and refurbished factories for new investment which were either sold or leased by the industrial development board, in each of the years since 1980, giving details by district council area.

Mr. Needham [holding answer 8 November 1989] : The information requested is set out below. It relates to vacant factories over 750 sq m.


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