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Mr. Freeman : Health authorities are already instructed to consult local planning authorities where a proposed development is one for which planning permission would normally be required.

Sir Dudley Smith : To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will request the South Warwickshire health authority to refrain from proceeding with the building of a large incinerator and chimney at the South Warwickshire hospital until the powers of control and licence for such a project have passed to the local authority.

Mr. Freeman : The responsibility for strategic planning and operational policy of waste disposal rests locally with the West Midlands regional health authority. South Warwickshire health authority has acted throughout in a responsible way. For further information my hon. Friend may like to consult the authority concerned.

Abortion

Mr. Butler : To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will list the places approved by him under section 1(3) of the Abortion Act 1967.


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Mrs. Virginia Bottomley : The following places have been approved for the period 1 February 1990 to 31 January 1992 :

Acland Nuffield, Hospital, Oxford

AMI Alexandra Hospital, Cheadle, Cheshire

BUPA Alexandra Hospital, Walderslade, Kent

Avenue Clinic, Hove, Sussex

Bath Clinic, Combe Down, Bath

AMI Beechwood Hospital, Norton, Sheffield

BUPA Belvedere Hospital, Scarborough

Blackdown Nursing Home, Blackdown, Leamington Spa

AMI Blackheath Hospital, London SE3

Bromhead Hospital, Lincoln

BUPA Hospital, Bushey, Watford, Hertfordshire

BUPA Murrayfield Hospital, Thingwall, Wirral, Merseyside BUPA Hospital, Norwich, Colney, Norwich

BUPA Hospital, Portsmouth

Calthorpe Nursing Home, Edgbaston, Birmingham

BUPA Chalybeate Hospital, Southampton, Hampshire

Chatsworth Clinic, New Barnet, Hertfordshire

AMI Chaucer Hospital, Canterbury

Chesterfield Nuffield Hospital, Bristol

Christchurch Park Hospital, Ipswich, Suffolk

BUPA Hospital Clare Park, Farnham, Surrey

Clementine Churchill Hospital, Harrow

Cleveland Nuffield Hospital, Stockton-on-Tees

Danum Lodge Nursing Home, Doncaster

Dean Park Nursing Home, Bournemouth, Dorset

Doncaster Independent Hospital, Doncaster

Droitwich Private Hospital, Droitwich, Worcestershire

Duchy Hospital, Truro, Treliske, Truro

Duchy House Nuffield Hospital, Harrogate

Evelyn Hospital, Cambridge

Exeter Nuffield Hospital, Exeter

Fairfield Nursing Home, Buckhurst Hill, Essex

Fallodon Private Nursing Home, Leeds

Fitzwilliam Hospital, South Bretton, Peterborough

Foscote Private Hospital, Banbury, Oxfordshire

Fulford Grange Hospital, Rawdon, Leeds

Garden Hospital, London NW4

Gisburne Park Hospital, Clitheroe, Lancashire

BUPA Glen Hospital, Bristol

Hampshire Clinic, Basingstoke

Highfield Private Hospital, Rochdale

HRH Princess Christian's Hospital, Windsor, Berkshire BUPA Hospital Hull and East Riding, Hull

Hull Nuffield Hospital, Hull

Humana Hospital, London NW8

King Edward VII Hospital, Midhurst

Leicester Nuffield Hospital, Leicester

Leigham Private Clinic, London SW16

Marie Stopes Nursing Home, London NW2

Merseyside Nursing Home, Liverpool

Newcastle Nuffield Hospital, Jesmond, Newcastle- upon-Tyne New Hall Hospital, Salisbury, Wiltshire

New Victoria Hospital, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey

BUPA North Cheshire Hospital, Warrington, Cheshire

AMI Park Hospital, Arnold, Nottingham

Parkfield Private Hospital, Rotherham, South Yorkshire Parkview Clinic, London W5

Plymouth Nuffield Hospital, Derrifold, Plymouth

AMI Portland Hospital for Women and Children, London W1 Raleigh Nursing Home, London SW2

Robert Nursing Home, Kings Norton, Birmingham

Rosslyn Nursing Home, East Twickenham, Middlesex

Royal Masonic Hospital, London W6

Salop Nuffield Hospital, Shrewsbury

Sarum Road Private Hospital, Winchester, Hampshire

Somerset Nuffield Hospital, Taunton, Somerset

BUPA South Bank Hospital, Worcester

South Manchester Private Clinic, Stockport

BUPA Wellesley Hospital, Southend-on-Sea

Wessex Nuffield Hospital, Eastleigh, Hampshire


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Winterbourne Hospital, Dorchester, Dorset

Wistons Nursing Home, Brighton

Woking Nuffield Hospital, Woking

Wye Valley Nuffield Hospital, Hereford

Yorkshire Clinic, Bingley, West Yorkshire

As part of the Department's control of the private sector all these places have been subject to unannounced visits of inspection during the previous approval period. Those places specialising in abortion have been visited more frequently by both medical/nursing and investigative officers. During these visits the operation of approved places is closely observed to ensure they meet the condition required in respect of medical and nursing practice, administrative and financial arrangements and facilities and equipment provided.

Haemophiliacs

Mr. Macdonald : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will make a statement on the extent to which the production of safe and efficient factor 8 concentrates from United Kingdom national fractionation centres meets the need of haemophiliacs in the United Kingdom ;

(2) when he expects the United Kingdom to achieve self-sufficiency in blood products ;

(3) at what date United Kingdom haemophiliacs will be able to receive factor 8 made solely from the plasma of unpaid donors to the national blood transfusion service.

Mr. Freeman : At present in England and Wales approximately 70 per cent. of the factor 8 used to treat haemophiliacs is produced at the blood products laboratory from the plasma of unpaid donors to the national blood transfusion service. The remainder is commercially produced factor 8 which is imported into the United Kingdom. The imported products are being prescribed as a result of the preference of individual clinicians. The blood products laboratory is, therefore, meeting in full the demand for its factor 8, as it is for virtually all other blood products. It is making efforts to increase its share of the blood products market in this country, but the choice of product remains with the clinician.

The information relating to Scotland and Northern Ireland is a matter for my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Organ Donations (Payment)

Mr. Macdonald : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to prohibit payment for donations of human organs, blood and plasma in the United Kingdom ; and if he has any plans to restrict the processing and distribution of such donations to a publicly controlled agency within the National Health Service.

Mr. Freeman : Our donors give blood and plasma freely, and have always done so. The Government are committed to maintaining this principle of voluntary and unpaid donation. There are certainly no plans to privatise blood collection and supply of blood products in this country.

The Human Organ Transplants Act 1989 prohibits commercial dealings in human organs intended for transplant. Donations of human organs will be carefully monitored under the Act and its regulations. The Act introduced controls to ensure that human organs are donated freely and according to certain conditions.


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Organ donations from live donors are subject to particular regulations which have been approved by Parliament and will come into effect on 1 April 1990. The Unrelated Live Transplant Regulatory Authority (ULTRA), which is being set up under this Act, will have to be satisfied that certain conditions are met in cases of donation of organs between persons who are genetically unrelated before the proposed transplant will be able to take place.

The information relating to Scotland and Northern Ireland is a matter for my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Scotland and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.

Mentally Ill People(Basingstoke and North Hampshire)

Mr. Hunter : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many beds for long-term mentally ill patients provided by the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health authority are currently occupied by patients from other health districts ;

(2) how many long-term beds for mentally ill patients are provided by the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health authority other than those provided by the psychiatric division, Park Prewett ; (3) how many long-term beds for mentally ill patients are provided by the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health authority at the psychiatric division, Park Prewett ;

(4) how many National Health Service-funded mentally ill patients from the Basingstoke and North Hampshire district are currently accommodated in National Health Service hospitals or private nursing homes in other districts ;

(5) if he will list the private nursing homes in the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health district which are registered for the mentally ill ; how many mentally ill patients each can accommodate ; how many each is currently accommodating ; and how many of these are National Health Service funded.

Mr. Freeman : During the year 1 April 1988 to 31 March 1989 there were on average 318 beds available daily in NHS wards for long-stay mental illness patients in Basingstoke and North Hampshire health district. All these beds were at Park Prewett hospital. The number of beds occupied by patients from other districts is not available centrally.

Figures for the numbers of patients with a mental illness, from the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health district, who are accommodated in hospital and units outside the district are not available centrally.

As at 31 March 1988, none of the private institutions in the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health district, registered under section 23 of the Registered Homes Act 1984, contained beds specifically for mental illness patients. Information is not available centrally on mentally ill patients that may be resident in these institutions.

Mr. Hunter : To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make a statement on the level of the provision of care for mentally ill patients in the Basingstoke and North Hampshire district.


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Mr. Freeman : It is for the Basingstoke and North Hampshire health authority to decide the level of provision of care for mentally ill patients in its district, taking account of local needs and priorities.

Acute Services

Sir Eldon Griffiths : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information he has on the decision of the East Anglian regional health authority that its future planning should be based on the assumption that hospitals providing acute services for East Anglia must have a minimum of 550 to 600 beds for long-term viability ; what is Government policy on this matter ; how many existing acute hospitals in all parts of the country have fewer than 550 to 600 beds ; and if he will make a statement.

Mrs. Virginia Bottomley : The appropriate size of an acute hospital is a matter for local decision, in the light of particular needs and circumstances including the 24-hour provision of equipment and skilled staff. I understand that at its January meeting the East Anglian regional health authority endorsed, for planning purposes, the principle of a minimum size for future general acute hospitals. At the beginning of 1987 there were in England 431 acute hospitals (not necessarily all offering district general hospital facilities) with less than 600 beds in total. Departmental policies require authorities to consider the financial, manpower and interdependent service consequences of their planning options.

This is based on the definition that such hospitals should have at least 85 per cent. of their beds in the acute specialties.

Budgets and Forecasts

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what are his Department's procedures for producing budgets and forecasts ; what guidance is issued on the use of those procedures ; what criteria are applied when judging cost effectiveness ; and if he will make a statement.


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