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Written Answers to Questions

Thursday 25 April 1991

ENVIRONMENT

Solihull Urban District Plan

Mr. Mills : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will issue guidelines on the release of land concerning the type of houses identified to meet demand in the urban district plan for Solihull.

Mr. Yeo : Solihull's deposited unitary development plan includes a policy on the type of dwellings to be allowed on housing sites with the aim of providing a mix of types of dwellings to cater for different needs.

The Secretary of State's strategic guidance for the West Midlands (PPG10) does not include guidelines on the release of land for different types of houses. He will, however, consider the need for advice on this subject in the forthcoming West Midlands regional guidance.

Mr. Mills : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will review the number of houses identified to meet demand and over the next 20 years in the urban district plan for Solihull.

Mr. Yeo : The housing figure of 7,500 included in the Solihull unitary development plan is that recommended in the West Midlands strategic guidance published in February 1988. The Secretary of State does not propose to review that figure, as the guidance provides a policy package for the whole period 1988-2001 and to change any element of it could be prejudicial to the success of the package. Regional guidance for the West Midlands region, which will incorporate a review of strategic guidance, will be produced over the next two to three years, and this will provide an opportunity to assess the effectiveness of the guidance policies and make any necessary changes.

Compulsory Purchase Compensation

Mr. Mills : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what would be the cost of extending the 10 per cent. addition to compulsory purchase compensation to the compulsory purchase of agricultural land.

Mr. Yeo : Figures relating exclusively to the compulsory acquisition of agricultural land are not collected centrally.

Starter Homes

Mr. Mills : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what encouragement he has given to an increase in the number of starter homes.

Mr. Yeo : For the most part it is for the building industry to offer homes at a price people can afford. We have asked planning authorities to deal promptly with planning applications and streamlined appeal procedures. We encourage local authorities to make land available for all forms of low- cost home ownership, one aspect of which


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is our initiative to secure the release of sites for local needs in rural areas. Through the Housing Corporation we have invested nearly £400 million since 1983 in shared ownership schemes, which has brought home ownership within the reach of over 20,000 first-time buyers.

Countryside Stewardship Scheme

Mr. Ron Davies : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what definition his Department uses for a public good when determining non- financial benefits under the proposed countryside stewardship scheme ; and whether it includes the conservation of wildlife and habitats.

Mr. Baldry : It is intended that under the countryside stewardship scheme payments will be made to land managers and farmers to protect and enhance key landscapes and habitats which are valued by the public ; and to improve public enjoyment of them through the sensitive provision of access. Benefits to wildlife will be derived from the protection and enhancement of the habitats on which it is dependent.

Mr. Ron Davies : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what organisations he has consulted over the implementation of the countryside stewardship scheme.

Mr. Baldry : The Countryside Commission has been developing countryside stewardship in conjunction with my Department, the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, the Nature Conservancy Council, now English Nature, and English Heritage. Discussion has taken place with a large number of organisations including the British Council for Archaeology, the Council for the Protection of Rural England, the Country Landowners Association, the Farming and Wildlife Trust, the National Farmers Union, the national park authorities, the National Sheep Association, the National Trust, the Open Spaces Society, the Ramblers Association, the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors, the Royal Society for Nature Conservation, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, the Tenant Farmers Association and the World Wide Fund for Nature UK. There has been substantial correspondence with many others.

Severn Estuary

Mr. Morgan : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what proposals he has regarding the formal designation as a special protection area under the 1979 EC Wild Birds Directive of the inter-tidal areas on the English bank of the Severn estuary so far proposed for designation by the Nature Conservancy Council.

Mr. Baldry : The Nature Conservancy Council's proposal for the designation of the Severn estuary as a special protection area is under consideration.

Benzene

Mr. Butler : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what steps are taken to monitor the levels of benzene in drinking water in the United Kingdom.

Mr. Baldry : My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for the Environment is responsible only for drinking water quality in England. I am, however, answering these questions with the agreement of the Secretary of State for


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Wales. Drinking water quality in Scotland and Northern Ireland is the responsibility of the respective Secretaries of State. I am not aware of benzene being found during 1990 in public water supplies in England and Wales.

Benzene is not likely to be found in drinking water except as the result of pollution. If a water company suspected that benzene or other hydrocarbon was present in its supplies it would be required to monitor in accordance with regulation 14 of the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations 1989 and as advised in the publication "Guidance on Safeguarding the Quality of Public Water Supplies" issued by the Department of the Environment and the Welsh Office.

Right to Repair Scheme

Mr. Simon Coombs : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on the right to repair scheme.

Mr. Yeo : I refer my hon. Friend to the answer given by my hon. Friend the Minister for Housing and Planning on 31 October 1990 to the hon. Member for Hammersmith (Mr. Soley), Official Report, column 535. The number of claims under the right to repair scheme continues to be low.

Housing Stock

Mr. Soley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will produce a table giving, for each of the local authorities that have undertaken large-scale voluntary transfer of their housing stock to other bodies, (a) at the time of the transfer, the local authority's outstanding loan debt on its housing stock, (b) the actual price paid for the transfer, (c) the estimate of right to buy receipts included in the valuation price, (d) the amount of the purchase price used by the local authority to repay debt incurred for local housing purposes, (e) the amount of the receipts so far re-invested in housing improvement or development either (i) with the body purchasing the stock, or (ii) registered housing associations not involved with the purchase, or (iii) other outside bodies, or (iv) by the local authority itself, (f) where such re-investment is with a registered housing association, the amount reclaimed by the local authority from the housing corporation as housing association grant and (g) an estimate of the total number of new dwellings built or planned as a result of the re- investment so far undertaken.

Sir George Young : The table gives the information requested except for (d), (e), (f) and (g). On (d) , local authorities must set aside either 75 per cent. of the receipts from large-scale voluntary transfers or whatever is required to cover the debt on the transferred housing up to 100 per cent. of the receipts, whichever is the greater. The exact amounts of the receipts which were used to repay the debts on other housing expenditure are not available centrally. On (f), housing association grant for local authority sponsored schemes is claimed by housing associatitons, not by local authorities. Although the grant is used to repay development loans from local authorities, neither the Housing Corporation nor the Department is in a position to know whether the loans have been funded from voluntary transfer receipts or from other sources. On (e) and (g), local authorities are required to inform the


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Department of their expenditure, but the proceeds of large-scale voluntary transfers reinvested in local housing are not separately identified.


£ million                                                                        

Local Authority    |Loan Debt on   |Price paid for |RTB Receipts                   

                   |Housing        |Transfer       |included in                    

                   |Stock          |(gross)        |Valuation                      

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chiltern           |20.738         |32.90          |16.32                          

Sevenoaks          |25.768         |65.50          |31.58                          

Newbury            |43.000         |47.00          |22.29                          

Swale              |37.054         |55.15          |13.10                          

Broadland          |18.042         |25.08          |10.34                          

North Bedfordshire |45.228         |63.50          |8.93                           

Medina             |17.300         |27.85          |3.93                           

Rochester          |53.200         |76.96          |22.19                          

South Wight        |16.200         |22.84          |3.83                           

Mid Sussex         |24.914         |44.19          |20.45                          

East Dorset        |11.200         |21.63          |3.01                           

Tonbridge and                                                                      

   Malling         |22.300         |54.40          |14.16                          

Ryedale            |13.520         |28.29          |5.54                           

South Bucks        |16.300         |35.27          |6.50                           

Christchurch       |7.200          |14.10          |0.30                           

Advertising

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will give separate figures for the spending by his Department on (a) television advertising, (b) radio advertising, (c) newspaper advertising and (d) other promotional material in 1979-80 and in each following year ; and what are his latest estimates for 1990-91 and budgets for 1991-92.

Mr. Heseltine : I refer the hon. Member to the reply which I gave to the hon. Member for Stoke-on-Trent, Central (Mr. Fisher) on 12 December 1990, Official Report, c. 442. Information relating to financial years 1979 -80 to 1984-85, inclusive, is not readily available and could not be obtained without disproportionate cost. The provisional outturn for 1990-91 is £7.9 million and the provisional budget for 1991-92 is £6.6 million ; the latter figure excludes PSAs, the Building Research Establishment Agency and the Queen Elizabeth II conference centre where budgets have not yet been finalised.

Plankton

Mr. Dalyell : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on his response to the conference in Plymouth, on the role of plankton in climate change, at which he was represented.

Mr. Baldry : The symposium on the biological consequences of global warming, held at the polytechnic of the south west, Plymouth, was a scientific meeting at which Government Departments were not represented. The role of plankton in the global carbon cycle is among the topics to be further reviewed by the intergovernmental panel on climate change, for which the United Kingdom continues to lead the scientific assessment under the chairmanship of Dr. John Houghton, chief executive of the Meteorological Office.


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Biodiversity Convention

Mr. Dalyell : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will make a statement on his response to the policy conclusions of the recent biodiversity convention, at which he was represented.

Mr. Baldry : My Department was represented, along with officials from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and the Overseas Development Administration, at a meeting of legal and technical experts on biological diversity convened in March by the United Nations Environment Programme. This was largely concerned with deciding the necessary procedures to enable negotiation of a global convention to begin at the next meeting which will be held in Madrid from 24 June to 3 July.

Halon

Mr. Sumberg : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what steps he is taking to identify the extent of and need for halon use within the United Kingdom ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Trippier : Under the amendments to the Montreal protocol that were agreed in London last June, the production of halons is to be phased out by 2,000, subject to limited exemptions for essential uses. The parties to the protocol are to agree an initial list of essential uses next year. Halons cause serious damage to the ozone layer, but they are at present widely used for firefighting. In order to establish a clear picture of halon use within the UK my Department has decided to commission a detailed study by C. S. Todd and Associates. This will seek to identify those uses for which substitutes are already available, what can be done to help this substitution, and those uses which appear likely to be essential at present.

Air Pollution

Mr. Sumberg : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when he proposes to issue general guidance to local authorities on procedural and other aspects of the new local authority air pollution control system established under part I of the Environment Protection Act 1990.

Mr. Trippier : We have issued today a set of five guidance notes which are intended to serve as a manual for local authorities on the operation of the new local authority air pollution controls under the Environmental Protection Act, which came into force on 1 April. I also commend the notes to operators of processes which are affected by the controls and to others with an interest in how the new system will work.

The notes are : "Introduction to Part I of the Act,"

"Authorisations," "Applications and registers," "Interpretation of terms used in process guidance notes," and "Appeals."

A set of the notes has been placed in the Library of the House.

Competitive Tendering

Mr. Harry Greenway : To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment when he intends to publish the results of research into the effects of competitive tendering for local authority services.


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Mr. Key : My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has today published the full report of the first year's research into the impact of competitive tendering under the Local Government Act 1988 which has been carried out for us by the Institute of Local Government Studies. Copies have been placed in the Library of the House.

The research confirms that competitive tendering has brought about improvements in the efficiency with which services are provided, combined with a renewed emphasis on the quality of service. In particular, it shows in the authorities studied that an average saving of 6 per cent. in the annual value of contracts subject to competitive tendering has been achieved, with savings often accompanied by improvements in service standards ; that productivity improvements through manual staff reductions of the order of 17 per cent. to 26 per cent. have been secured in services subject to keenest competition ; and that many local authorities are considering the methods and standards of service provision in a much more systematic way.

The research is continuing for a further two years to permit a thoroughgoing analysis of contract performance and developments in local authorities over time.

ATTORNEY-GENERAL

Family Conciliation Services

Ms. Primarolo : To ask the Attorney-General what provision his Department will be making for funding of family conciliation services in 1991-92.

The Attorney-General : I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to my hon. Friend the Member for Chislehurst (Mr. Sims) on 18 April 1991 at column 221.

Arbitration Figures

Mr. Alton : To ask the Attorney-General what representations he has received about the Lord Chancellor's proposals to raise arbitration figures to £1,000 and to include claims for personal injuries in this figure ; and if he will make a statement.

The Attorney-General : I have received no such representations. My noble and learned Friend the Lord Chancellor has, however, received numerous representations both prior to and since the publication of the report of the review body on civil justice (Cm 394), which recommended that the arbitration limit be increased to £1,000. The existing limit of £500 was set in 1981 and the new limit, which will have effect from July 1991, restores the financial level below which cases are automatically referred to arbitration to a realistic level, enabling the small claims procedure to continue to provide an efficient and accessible means of redress for small litigants.

The civil justice review body also found that the cost of legal representation in small personal injury cases was often disproportionate to the amount in issue, and recommended that they be dealt with under the small claims arbitration procedure. The Lord Chancellor has received representation on this issue from the Law Society, the Trades Union Congress and the National Consumer Council. The Lord Chancellor is currently considering the way forward in the light of the civil justice review's recommendation and the representations that have been made.


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Court Proceedings

Mr. Mullin : To ask the Attorney-General what likelihood of success the Director of Public Prosecutions requires before proceeding (a) against a police officer and (b) against a member of the public.

The Attorney-General : When deciding whether or not to prosecute, the code for Crown prosecutors issued by the Director of Public Prosecutions in accordance with section 10 of the Prosecution of Offence Act 1985 stipulates two general criteria for the institution of criminal proceedings. They are, first, that there must be admissible, substantial and reliable evidence to offer a realistic prospect of conviction ; and, secondly, that the public interest requires a prosecution.

No distinction is drawn between cases involving police officers and members of the public.

Building Work

Mr. Fisher : To ask the Attorney-General whether he will list the number and location of all new buildings or extensions commissioned by the Lord Chancellor's Department in each of the past five years which (a) had contracts worth between £3 million and £5 million and (b) had contracts worth more than £5 million.

The Attorney-General : The following tables show the number and location of all new buildings or extensions where construction contracts were let by the Lord Chancellor's Department, and construction commenced, from 1986 to 1990 inclusive, which had contracts each worth (a) between £3 million and £5 million and (b) more than £5 million.



Between £3 million and £5 million       

--------------------------------------------

1986                                        

Grimsby             |<1>Combined            

Guildford           |Crown                  

                                            

1987                                        

Doncaster           |Crown                  

                                            

Over £5 million                           

1986                                        

Coventry            |Combined               

Derby               |Combined               

Truro               |Combined               

Wood Green          |Crown                  

                                            

1987                                        

Newcastle, Quayside |Combined               

RCJ (12 additional                          

courts)             |High Court             

Wolverhampton       |Combined               

                                            

1988                                        

Harrow              |Crown                  

Hull                |Combined               

Luton               |Crown                  

Manchester                                  

(Crown Sq)          |Combined               

Northampton         |Combined               

Stoke               |Combined               

Teesside            |Combined               

                                            

1989                                        

Bradford            |Combined               

Chester             |Crown                  

Newport (Gwent)     |Crown                  

Stafford            |Combined               

Warrington          |Combined               

Woolwich            |Crown                  

                                            

1990                                        

Borough             |Crown                  

Bristol             |Crown                  

Carlisle            |Combined               

St. Albans          |Crown                  

<1>Combined Crown and County Court.         

Immigration Appeals

Mr. Watson : To ask the Attorney-General in relation to immigration appeals in Scotland, during the years 1988, 1989 and 1990 how long, on average, was the lapse between the appeal being lodged and the hearing taking place ; and what percentage of cases were successful.

The Attorney-General : The immigration appellate authorities do not record details of the average time taken for appeals to come before an adjudicator from the time the appeal is lodged. However, it is estimated that for the period 1988 to 1990, the average time taken for appeals to come before an adjudicator in Scotland from the date the parties indicated readiness to proceed to a hearing was six to eight months.

The IAA do not record details of the percentage of successful cases at individual hearing centres.

THE ARTS

Building Work

Mr. Fisher : To ask the Minister for the Arts whether he will list the number and location of all new buildings or extensions commissioned by his Department in each of the past five years which (a) had contracts worth between £3 million and £5 million and (b) had contracts worth more than £5 million.

Mr. Tim Renton : During the past five years, the Office of Arts and Libraries has commissioned only one building project, the completion phase of the new British library building at St. Pancras. The anticipated contract value of this project in cash terms is £150 million.

ENERGY

Home Energy Efficiency

Mr. Wallace : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list the network installers appointed by the Energy Action Grants Agency to administer the home energy efficiency scheme ; and if he will indicate the area covered by each network installer.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory : I have today placed copies of a list of network installers registered under the home energy efficiency scheme in the Library of the House.

I understand that, in the case of Scottish area 14, which covers the highlands, Western Isles, Orkney and Shetland, full coverage has yet to be reached. The Energy Action Grants Agency has had discussions with the registered network installer for that area and will be making proposasls to my Department shortly on how the benefits of the scheme can best be brought to the whole area.


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Trawsfynydd Power Station

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will make a statement on the reasons for the shut-down of Trawsfynydd nuclear power station ; how long it was out of commission ; what was the cost to the nation's power supply ; and what was the cost of repair.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory : The two reactors at Trawsfynydd nuclear power station were shut down by Nuclear Electric plc (NE) at the beginning of February to make adjustments to operate them at a lower coolant gas pressure. This decision was taken in the light of the latest data on the irradiated properties of the steel used in the pressure vessel. Operation at reduced pressure is intended to maintain the very high margins of safety required by the Health and Safety Executive's nuclear installations inspectorate.

The NII was kept fully informed of NE's decision and supported the action taken by NE. The reactors will not be restarted without the agreement of the NII.

The commercial flexibilities open to NE and the regional electricity companies mean that this is unlikely to have any effect on the cost of electricity supplies to the RECs, or on the fossil fuel levy.

The cost to NE of adjustments to its reactors is an operational matter for the company.

St. John Ambulance Brigade

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what facilities he is making available to staff in his Department to contribute to the appeal that has been launched for people with the name of John to help raise £5 million for the St. John Ambulance Brigade.

Mr. Wakeham : My Department has arrangements which enable staff to contribute by deduction from pay to charities of their choice. It has no plans to provide further facilities for the appeal mentioned by the hon. Member.

Spent Nuclear Fuel

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy when plutonium material extracted from spent nuclear fuel in the thermal oxide reprocessing plant at Sellafield will start to be returned to European customers ; whether the plutonium materials will be transported to European destinations by land or sea ; which British seaports or airports will be used ; and if he will make a statement about current intentions with regard to the transport of plutonium to overseas customers.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory : British Nuclear Fuels plc expects to return plutonium extracted from spent fuel in its thermal oxide reprocessing plant to its customers in Europe from the mid-1990s onwards. Plutonium arising from reprocessing in this country is returned to its country of origin or to any other destination only subject to application of safeguards and on receipt of assurances covering peaceful use, physical protection and controls on re-transfer. Its transport must be made in compliance with stringent national and international regulations. I understand that the options for returning the plutonium referred to by the hon. Member are still under consideration.


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Domestic Energy Consumption

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what is the percentage of domestic electricity consumption which is used in lighting, space heating, refrigeration, water heating, washing machines and driers and cooking, respectively.

Mr. Wakeham : An estimated breakdown of domestic electricity consumption by end use for 1986-87 for England and Wales only is given in the table :


                 |End use              

                 |Percentage           

---------------------------------------

Lighting         |8.9                  

Space heating    |22.2                 

Water heating    |14.2                 

Cooking          |9.3                  

Kettles          |5.3                  

Washing machines |4.2                  

Tumble driers    |2.2                  

Refrigerators and freezers 18.9        

Television       |5.7                  

Other<1>         |10.1                 

                 |---                  

 Total           |100.0                

<1> Other includes irons, dishwashers, 

vacuum cleaners, hi fi and small       

electrical appliances.                 

Source: Electricity Association.       

Data for later years are not yet available.

Electricity Privatisation

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what was the total of fees paid to underwriters and sub-underwriters involved in the flotation of National Power and PowerGen.

Mr. Wakeham : Primary underwriters were not appointed for this flotation. A total of £14.9 million was paid to United Kingdom sub- underwriters and a further £6 million was paid out in commission to overseas underwriters.

Non-fossil Fuel Obligation

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will make a statement on the areas of responsibility of (a) his Department, (b) the Office of Electricity Supply and (c) the Non-Fossil Fuel Purchasing Agency Ltd. in respect of determining the mechanism by which prices are paid to renewable electricity generators under the Non-Fossil Fuel Obligation.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory : The division of functions under the legislation is set out in my Department's "Renewables Energy Bulletin No. 4", a copy of which I placed in the Library of the House in December. As that explains, responsibility for making arrangements to comply with an order setting a non-fossil fuel obligation lies with the regional electricity companies on which the obligation is placed and for which the Non-Fossil Purchasing Agency Ltd. acts. However, in view of the role of the Director General of Electricity Supply in examining the arrangements made, the NFPA developed its pricing mechanism in close consultation with the Office of Electricity Regulation.

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list the number of tenders received by the


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Non-Fossil Fuel Purchasing Agency Ltd. for inclusion within the 1991 renewable tranche for each of (a) wind power, (b) hydro, (c) landfill gas, (d) municipal waste incineration, (e) general industrial waste incineration and (f) others ; and what is the total capacity tendered in megawatts for each category.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory : The Non-Fossil Purchasing Agency Ltd. has adopted a competitive tendering procedure for selecting the projects to be contracted under the proposed 1991 Renewables Order. I am unable to publish any details of the bids submitted to the NFPA, since to do so might prejudice this procedure.


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Advertising

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will give separate figures for the spending by his Department on (a) television advertising, (b) radio advertising, (c) newspaper advertising and (d) other promotional material in 1979-80 and in each following year ; and what are his latest estimates for 1990-91 and budgets for 1991-92.

Mr. Wakeham : The information requested is as follows :


Column 499


£'000                                                                 

            |Television |Newspaper  |Radio      |Other                  

            |advertising|advertising|advertising|promotional            

                                                |material               

------------------------------------------------------------------------

1990-91<1>  |0          |559        |0          |1,074                  

1989-90     |0          |892        |0          |1,000                  

1988-89     |0          |2,378      |4          |1,313                  

1987-88     |0          |1,513      |0          |959                    

1986-87     |16,300     |11,830     |1,219      |1,125                  

1985-86     |2,212      |1,589      |0          |<2>-                   

1984-85     |1,302      |1,572      |27         |<2>-                   

1983-84     |682        |1,770      |50         |<2>-                   

1982-83     |292        |955        |0          |<2>-                   

1981-82     |2,550      |530        |0          |<2>-                   

1980-81     |1,500      |1,590      |0          |<2>-                   

1979-80     |20         |1,280      |0          |<2>-                   

<1>Latest forecast; expenditure on the privatisation of the electricity 

supply industry will be notified to Parliament in the usual way when    

the                                                                     

figures have been finalised.                                            

<2>Expenditure on other promotional material prior to 1986-87 is not    

available on a comparable basis.                                        

Detailed decisions on expenditure by media in 1991-92 have not yet been taken.

Building Work

Mr. Fisher : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy whether he will list the number and location of all new buildings or extensions commissioned by his Department in each of the past five years which (a) had contracts worth between £3 million and £5 million and (b) had contracts worth more than £5 million.

Mr. Wakeham : The Department of Energy has commissioned no new buildings or extensions in the last five years. Expenditure on the Department's new headquarters building over the period 1987-88 to 1989-90 was borne on the Property Services Agency's vote.

Office of Gas Supply

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what has been the annual cost of the Office of Gas Supply and each regional consultative committee since their inception.

Mr. Wakeham : This is a matter for the Director General of Gas Supply and the chairman of the Gas Consumers Council. I also refer the hon. Member to the supply estimates, the Government's expenditure plans within the energy sector and the annual report of the Director General of Gas Supply which were presented to Parliament earlier this year.

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list all the people he has appointed to serve at the Office of Gas Supply and each regional consultative committee giving the age, address and profession of each such person.


Column 500

Mr. Wakeham : The Director General of Gas Supply alone is appointed by me. Mr. McKinnon is an accountant by profession.

Office of Electricity Regulation

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy if he will list all the people he has appointed to serve at the Office of Electricity Regulation and to each regional consultation committee, giving the age, address and profession of each such person.

Mr. Wakeham : I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave on 26 February at columns 448-49.

Energy Research and Development

Mr. Flynn : To ask the Secretary of State for Energy what benefits have accrued to the United Kingdom from participation in the European Communities' energy research and development programme 1990 to 1994, to date.


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