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Newhaven detention centre, East Sussex, over the period 21 to 23 December 1993 ; and what were the reasons for their detention.

Mr. Charles Wardle : The number of passengers who had arrived at Gatwick airport on flight JQ 001 from Jamaica who were held at Campsfield house or the Newhaven detention centre for the period 21 to 23 December 1993 was as follows :


Date                         |Detention       |Number of                        

                             |Centre          |Detainees                        

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Night of 21-22 December 1993 |Campsfield House|49                               

                             |Newhaven        |4                                

Night of 22-23 December 1993 |Campsfield House|22                               

                             |Newhaven        |4                                

Night of 23-24 December 1993 |Campsfield House|22                               

                             |Newhaven        |4                                

Each case was considered on its merits and detention was authorised only when the immigration service considered that the person concerned was not likely to comply with the terms of temporary admission.

In addition, one other Jamaican national was detained at Campsfield house during this period.

Immigration

Ms Harman : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received in relation to immigration issues concerning passengers from Jamaica on 21 December 1993 ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Charles Wardle : About 80 letters have been received about individual cases or wider issues.

Ms Harman : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will place in the Library the correspondence and any other documents relating to the immigration issues concerning the flight from Jamaica on 21 December 1993 ; and if he will make a statement ; (2) if he will make a statement about immigration issues in respect of passengers from Jamaica on 21 December 1993.

Mr. Charles Wardle : I have arranged for a copy of my reply today, to the hon. Member for Nottingham, North (Mr. Allen), about the arrival of flight JQ 001 from Kingston, to be placed in the Library.

Ms Harman : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he had prior discussions with the airline or the travel agents about immigration issues for passengers flying from Jamaica on 21 December 1993 ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Charles Wardle : On 16 December the immigration service was telephoned by the airline and the charterer. They inquired about the desirability of the passengers obtaining prior entry clearance ; about the possibility of incurring carriers' liability charges ; and whether it would be possible to send an immigration officer to Kingston to examine the passengers before embarkation.

They were advised by the immigration service that carriers' liability was unlikely to be a problem provided that the passengers held a valid passport ; and that prior entry clearance was not required for Jamaican citizens,


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although they were encouraged to apply if in any doubt about their eligibility for admission. They were also informed that pre-clearance in Kingston would not be possible. There are no standing arrangements for the immigration service to operate controls overseas, and even if such an arrangement had been thought desirable it would not have been possible to conclude the necessary agreements with the Jamaican authorities in the short time available.

The immigration service subsequently confirmed with the airline the expected time of arrival, aircraft type and the expected number of passengers, and logistical arrangements for disembarkation were discussed with the airline's handling agents. The airline also provided the immigration service with a passenger manifest three and a half hours prior to the aircraft's arrival at Gatwick.

Ms Harman : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many passengers from Jamaica on 21 December 1993 were (a) allowed to remain and (b) deported ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Charles Wardle : There were 326 passengers on flight JQ 001 from Kingston. On 12 January 1994, 67 passengers had been refused leave to enter of whom 33 had been removed. Five cases have still to be resolved.

Ms Harman : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what immigration procedures are applied to passengers travelling from Jamaica on (a) scheduled and (b) charter flights ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Charles Wardle : All passengers who seek leave to enter the United Kingdom are examined by an immigration officer and must satisfy him that they quality for entry under the immigration rules.

Vladimir Zhirinovsky

Mr. Winnick : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if it is the policy of the Government to refuse permission of the Russian citizen, Vladimir Zhirinovsky, to enter the United Kingdom.

Mr. Charles Wardle : It is open to the Home Secretary to direct personally that entry be refused to a foreign national whose exclusion would be conducive to the public good. Consideration is given to the individual merits of any case, and account taken of the purpose of any proposed visit and all the relevant circumstances.

Joy Gardner

Mrs. Roche : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects the Police Complaints Authority's investigation into the death of Joy Gardner to report.

Mr. Charles Wardle : The police investigation into the death of Mrs. Gardner is being supervised by the Police Complaints Authority and it is a matter for the authority itself to decide when the investigation has been completed to its satisfaction.

Charitable Bodies

Mr. Blunkett : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hospitals and trusts have within them a registered charitable body ; and if he will make a statement.


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Mr. Peter Lloyd : The Charity Commissioners are currently conducting a review of such bodies for the purpose of updating the register of charities and precise figures are not available at present.

The great majority of NHS trusts are trustees of charitable funds which have been transferred to them from health authorities. There are also 26 groups of special trustees responsible for funds attached to teaching hospitals. In some cases, a single NHS trust may administer as many as 100 different charitable funds.

DEFENCE

Defence Costs Study

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) pursuant to his answer of 14 December, Official Report, column 631, if he is now prepared to state (a) the number of study teams and (b) each of the different areas of support businesses they will be examining ;

(2) pursuant to his answer of 14 December, Official Report, column 631, whether he is now prepared to list each of the aspects of support that he will be looking at as part of the defence costs study ; and if he is now prepared to provide detailed information on their current functions and costs.

Mr. Aitken : The defence costs study is looking at all aspects of support to the front line. So far 16 individual studies have been set in hand to examine particular areas. These are the MOD's organisation and function ; service HQs, command and top-level budget structures ; MOD police ; research and development ; procurement projects and practices ; the function and organisation of the Procurement Executive ; a review of the market-testing programme ; financial management ; defence estate and property ; repair, spares, storage, distribution and infrastructure ; military training ; recruiting and manning ; medical support ; non- operational information technology ; security ; and naval support infrastructure. I am arranging for a short note explaining more about each of these studies to be placed in the Library of the House. A number of other areas are under consideration, and additional studies will continue to be added to this list. The function and costs of support organisations will be analysed as part of the study.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what communications he has had with his NATO counterparts relating to his defence costs study ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Aitken : My right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Defence outlined the purpose and scope of the defence costs study to his NATO counterparts at a Defence Planning Committee meeting held in Brussels on 8 and 9 December 1993.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 14 December, Official Report, column 632, if he will provide details of the rank or civil service grade of the members of the secretariat established to co-ordinate work on the defence costs study.

Mr. Aitken : The full-time secretariat team established to co- ordinate the defence costs study comprises an air vice marshall, a grade 5, a captain RN, a colonel, a grade 7, a higher executive officer (development), an administrative


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officer and a personal assistant. In addition, a grade 3 is also working on the study as part of his existing responsibility.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what communication took place between his officials and members of the media on the subject of the defence costs study on 20 December 1993 ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Aitken : Selected journalists were given a background briefing on the defence costs study on 20 December 1993 by a senior Ministry of Defence official.

Married Quarters

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what changes will result in the arrangements for financing capital expenditure on married quarters as a result of his plans to transfer the administration of married quarters to a housing trust ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : After the transfer of the Ministry of Defence married quarter estate to a housing trust, responsibility for capital expenditure on the estate will be assumed by the trust. The Ministry of Defence will pay rent on those properties required to meet the accommodation requirements of service personnel.

Joint Training Exercises

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will consider the deployment of battalion-sized groups for joint training exercises with former Warsaw pact forces ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : The prospect of joint military activities, and peacekeeping field exercises within the framework of "Partnership for Peace", was unveiled at the NATO summit meeting in Brussels earlier this week. In addition, the MOD is currently considering the specific possibilities for British land forces, initially at company level, to conduct joint training and exercises with some of our North Atlantic Co- operation Council partners.

General Cordy-Simpson

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he has taken to ensure that the recent experiences of General Cordy- Simpson have been incorporated into (a) training procedures and (b) the development of new doctrine ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : A formal and institutionalised mechanism already exists for debriefing commanders at all levels on return from all operations ; United Nations operations are no exception. Their observations and lessons are used to provide ongoing assessment and validation of both doctrine and training.

United Nations Military Operations

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps his Department has taken to assist the United Nations in improving its contingency planning arrangements for military operations ; and if he will make a statement.


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Mr. Hanley : In his report "An Agenda for Peace", the United Nations Secretary-General identified the need to strengthen the United Nation's capacity to conduct peace support operations and invited member states to make proposals in this regard. The United Kingdom's reply included suggestions for reinforcing the United Nation's planning mechanisms. The Ministry of Defence and the Foreign and Commonwealth Office continue to be actively involved in discussions aimed at taking these suggestions forward. In addition, the United Kingdom is co-operating fully with the United Nations standby forces planning team. Five military personnel are attached to the United Nations secretariat and agreement has been given in principle to a request for two more officers to be made available.

United Nations Military Intelligence

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether he is prepared to assist in the development of a United Nations military intelligence capability ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : A considerable volume of information is already available to the United Nations from a variety of sources and there is scope for enhancement of its ability to marshall and analyse this. The United Kingdom is ready to consider requests for assistance in this area. It would, however, be prohibitively expensive and unnecessary for the United Nations to develop its own military information capability.

Royal Ordnance

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information he has concerning the commercial relationship between Royal Ordnance and Heckler and Koch (a) prior to 1987 and (b) since 1987.

Mr. Aitken : A licence agreement between Heckler and Koch GmbH and the Secretary of State for Defence was signed in April 1970, with amendments completed in February 1972 and December 1977. Under the terms of the licence, royal small arms factory Enfield built various Heckler and Koch weapons and sold these to Heckler and Koch (UK). The licence transferred to RO plc on incorporation of the latter on 2 January 1985. The Secretary of State for Defence has had no responsibility for the affairs of RO plc since its sale to British Aerospace plc.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how export control legislation was applied to the activities of Royal Ordnance (a) before and (b) after privatisation ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Aitken : Prior to 2 January 1985, when the royal ordnance factories became a plc, any sales made directly through the defence exports sales supply division had Crown status, and were therefore not subject to licensing. All other exports of ROF equipment were subject to the normal licensing requirements. From 2 January 1985, all exports by RO were subject to licensing.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information he has concerning (a) the sale of rocket propellant to Iraq by Royal Ordnance and (b) assistance provided by Royal Ordnance to Iran for the construction of a weapons plant ; and if he will make a statement.


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Mr. Aitken : Matters relating to the export of United Kingdom defence equipment and dual use goods to Iraq are being investigated by Lord Justice Scott, and it would be inappropriate to comment on them before the publication of his final report. My Department holds no information to support the suggestion that Royal Ordnance provided assistance to Iran in the construction of a weapons plant.

HMS Intrepid

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 16 December, Official Report, column 918, what communications he has had with his NATO counterparts relating to the operational status of HMS Intrepid ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : Details of the operational status of all forces declared to NATO, which include HMS Intrepid, are made available to NATO, and to all NATO partners, on an annual basis.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 16 December, Official Report, column 918, what plans he has to return HMS Intrepid to operational status.

Mr. Hanley : HMS Intrepid is at present held in a state of extended readiness at Portsmouth. On current plans, she would be returned to operational status only in the event of an emergency.

Defence Research Agency

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) whether he will publish copies of the customer satisfaction surveys carried out by the Defence Research Agency in the last three years ; (2) what measures are used to assess the quality of service provided by the Defence Research Agency other than the customer satisfaction survey ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Aitken : This is a matter delegated to the Defence Research Agency under its framework document. I have therefore asked the chief executive to reply direct to the hon. Member.

Letter from John Chisholm to Dr. David Clark, dated 14 January 1994 :

In today's written answer the Minister of State for Defence Procurement informed you that I would be replying to your two questions about the quality of service provided by the DRA and the customer satisfaction survey.

I will deal with the customer satisfaction survey first. As I said in my answer of 16 December the survey is very extensive and is undertaken each year by an independent contractor experienced in this sort of work. The detailed results of the analysis are presented to me in a report by the contractor. Since this report includes information which has been collected in confidence it would not be right for me to put it into the public domain.

What I can say, however, is that the first two surveys showed a consistent picture and that our customers recognise that we are making good progress in achieving better performance. As I said in my last answer we analyse our performance against eight criteria : overall customer satisfaction, technical quality, facilities, staff reputation, understanding our customers' needs, project management and formal quality. The surveys showed the DRA scoring well on the first five criteria particularly technical quality and understanding of customers' needs. The 1992 survey showed a real improvement in responsiveness over the 1991 survey. Both surveys showed we had work to do in project management and


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formal quality. This is not surprising as the DRA has only had a formal customer/supplier relationship since becoming a Trading Fund in April 1993. Before this the organisation did not operate on a project basis and had no requirement for formal quality certification. I shall be looking with interest at the results of the 1993 survey (which I will receive shortly) to see if the benefits of the initiatives we have launched to correct those weaknesses have yet been detected by our customers.

You also asked what other measures we use beside the survey to gauge the quality of the service we offer. The major measure which is also one of my key performance targets, is achievement of customer programme "milestones". This means achieving a specific technical goal on time and to cost. We started from a low base level of only 50 in 1991/92 and our target is to reach 85 by 1997/98. But in fact we are already this year likely to achieve in excess of 80 which reflects very well on the enthusiasm of the organisation to turn itself into an efficient customer oriented business. Additionally we have some indication of the underlying scientific quality of our work through the peer group assessments of the quality of our strategic research proposals. These too show a steady improvement over the last three years.

Royal Anglian Regiment

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what training the 2nd Battalion, Royal Anglian Regiment, has received in the last six months in (a) route clearing, (b) anti-ambush drills, (c) convoy control, (d) driving techniques and (e) basic language skills ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : The 2nd Battalion, Royal Anglian Regiment, has been identified as the possible replacement for 1st Battalion, Coldstream Guards, if a further six months deployment were to be undertaken, and will undertake formal Operation Grapple training in February and March this year. The battalion already has considerable experience in route clearing, anti-ambush drills and driving techniques. Liaison officers with training in Serbo-Croat would be attached to the battalion if it deployed. No decisions have been taken about a further roulement of British forces in Bosnia in April/May this year.

10 Squadron

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 16 December, Official Report, column 909, what assessment he has made as to whether the repayments provided to his Department as a result of the non-defence tasks carried out by 10 Squadron are at an appropriate level ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : Repayment charges for non-defence tasks carried out by 10 Squadron are at an appropriate level. The criteria used for determining repayment charges accords with the rules and regulations set out in Government accounting and departmental guidelines.

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 16 December, Official Report, column 909 , what were the numbers and types of (a) non-defence specific tasks and (b) defence specific tasks carried out by 10 Squadron in 1992-93.

Mr. Hanley : In 1992-93, there were 17 repayment flights in respect of non-defence specific tasks, comprising nine for my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister, and eight for my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs.

The repayment flights in respect of defence-specific flights are as follows :


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48 Operational flights in support of UN operations in the former Republic of Yugoslavia ;

192 Weekly scheduled flights to Washington, Belize and Decimomannu ;

195 Flights in support of exercises (Tri-service requirement) ; 105 Special flights, including medical evacuations ;

and some 360 hours of Squadron training flights.

Heckler and Koch

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information he has concerning the use of Heckler and Koch weapons during the recent conflict in Cambodia ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Aitken : My Department has no firm information concerning the use of Heckler and Koch weapons during the recent Cambodian conflict.

Royal Yacht

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 16 December, Official Report, column 916, what was the cost of the refit of the royal yacht in 1991 and the nature of the work undertaken.

Mr. Aitken : The cost of the refit of the royal yacht in 1991 was some £7.2 million. The work involved fitting new sewage treatment plants ; major repairs to the hull ; refurbishment of steam and electric generators, main boilers and condensers and a complete repaint.

RAF Support Command

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 16 December, Official Report, column 907, whether he will publish the reports of efficiency savings at the stations and units within the RAF Support Command maintenance group.

Mr. Hanley : In the financial year--FY--1992-93, the RAF Support Command maintenance group achieved efficiency savings of £12,900,000. In FY 1993-94, the group is forecasting efficiency savings of £16,200,000. Details of efficiency savings are published in the Maintenance Group Defence Agency's annual report and accounts, a copy of which is in the Library of the House.

War Crimes, Bosnia

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 8 December, Official Report, column 290, if he will provide details of the number of occasions on which information on alleged war crimes in Bosnia has been passed to the relevant United Nation authorities by British forces.

Mr. Hanley : I will write to the hon. Member.

Departmental Objectives

Dr. David Clark : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to his answer of 10 December, Official Report, column 423, if he will provide details of the types of quantitive data used in his assessment of performance aganist departmental standing objectives ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : The quantitative aspect of performance review in the Department is based, first, on indicators of


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military capability and readiness for forces and headquarters ; these include manning levels, the availability of equipment, and levels of collective training. In addition, a significant amount of data is available to assess progress with management initiatives such as the efficiency programme, market testing and next steps reviews. The performance of the Procurement Executive is monitored by indicators of the health of major projects. Budgetary data are also employed.

RAF Carlisle

Mr. Kirkwood : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will publish the full study report and costings which formed the basis of the decision to close 14 maintenance unit, RAF Carlisle.

Mr. Hanley : It would not be appropriate to release the full study report and costings. A consultation document covering the factors involved has been issued to all interested parties, and further detailed information will be provided where appropriate.

Mr. Kirkwood : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement outlining the impact on other MOD establishments within the area of closing 14 maintenance unit, RAF Carlisle.

Mr. Hanley : I will write to the hon. Member.

Mr. Kirkwood : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is the value of all refurbishment work carried out at 14 maintenance unit, RAF Carlisle over the last five years.

Mr. Hanley : Over the last five years, £31 million has been spent on minor new build and refurbishment at RAF Carlisle.

Mr. Kirkwood : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how the decision to close 14 maintenance unit, RAF Carlisle is compatible with his announcement on "front line first".

Mr. Hanley : The defence cost study will be taking a new and radical look at all aspects of support, with the aim of identifying further areas where we can reduce costs. The proposals to rationalise the support provided to the RAF at the equipment supply depots by reducing to a single depot, which originated before the "front line first" programme was instituted, are entirely consistent with that aim.


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Mr. Kirkwood : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make more time available for the consultation process on the decision to close 14 maintenance unit, RAF Carlisle.

Mr. Hanley : At the request of the local trade unions at our meeting last month, I agreed that the consultation period should be extended by one month to 18 March 1994.

Mr. Kirkwood : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the transfer of posts to go from 14 maintenance unit, RAF Carlisle to 16 maintenance unit, RAF with an estimate of people and grades required for transfer.

Mr. Hanley : As indicated in the consultative document, a copy of which is in the Library of the House, it is estimated that some 332 civilian posts would be relocated. It is not possible at this stage to be specific about the numbers and grades of personnel required for transfer.


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