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Asylum and Immigration Appeals Act 1993. Representations from carriers against the imposition of charges are regularly received by the immigration service.

999 Calls

Mr. Hain : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what were the number of 999 calls made (a) per police officer and (b) per 100,000 population for each year since 1979 for the South Wales, Thames Valley, Kent, Lancashire, Avon and Somerset and Hampshire police authority areas ; and what were the comparable totals for all non-metropolitan and Welsh non-metropolitan police authority areas.

Mr. Maclean : The information requested is not collected centrally.

Racial Attacks

Mrs. Anne Campbell : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to curb the rise in racial attacks and the increasing activity of the British National party.

Mr. Charles Wardle : The Government have on many occasions expressed their abhorrence of racial violence and harassment and fully support police efforts to tackle racially motivated crime. Ministers have decided to reconvene the inter-departmental racial attacks group, chaired by the Home Office. The group provides a forum in which different agencies can examine the issue of racial violence at a national level, and co-ordinate a broad- based response. The first meeting is due to take place in February 1994.

The views of the British National party are as repugnant to the Government as they are to the public at large. If the activities of this group or its members breach the law, they are liable to be dealt with by the police under public order and criminal legislation, and a number of prosecutions of BNP members have been mounted in the past.

Video Rentals (Children)

Mr. Alton : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many proprietors of video rental outlets were prosecuted for supplying films with an 18 rating to children in the last year for which figures are available.

Mr. Maclean : I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to him on 11 January at column 139.


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Immigration

Mrs. Dunwoody : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to change the status in relation to entering the United Kingdom of citizens of Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Botswana, Canada, Dominica, The Gambia, Grenada, Guyana, Kiribati, Lesotho, the Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Namibia, Nauru, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, the Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Swaziland, Tanzania, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Western Somoa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Mr. Charles Wardle : My right hon. and learned Friend has at present no plans for any such changes.

Police Overtime (M11)

Mr. Gapes : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total cost in 1993 of the police overtime payments and other costs related to the security and policing for the M11 link road through Wanstead ; and if he will make a statement.


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Mr. Charles Wardle : I understand from the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis that the total manpower costs in 1993 of security and policing for the M11 link road through Wanstead amounted to £256, 211. Information on the cost of support services and other resources involved is not available.

Police Vehicles

Mr. Hain : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what are the vehicle replacement policies in terms of mileage and age for the South Wales, Thames Valley, Kent, Lancashire, Avon and Somerset and Hampshire police authority areas.

Mr. Charles Wardle : The information requested is as follows :


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                        |South Wales     |Thames Valley   |Kent            |Lancashire      |Avon and        |Hampshire                        

                                                                                            |Somerset                                          

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

General purpose vehicle |70-100,000      |80,000 miles/   |100,000 miles/  |70,000 miles/   |75,000 miles/   |80,000 miles                     

                        |miles           |4 years         |3 years         |3 years         |3 years                                           

Traffic vehicle         |120,000 miles   |100,000 miles/  |120,000 miles/  |70,000 miles/   |100,000 miles/  |120,000 miles                    

                                         |3 years         |2 years         |3 years         |2.5 years                                         

CID general vehicle     |70-100,000      |100,000 miles/  |100,000 miles/  |70,000 miles/   |100,000 miles/  |100-120,000                      

                        |miles           |5 years         |5 years         |3 years         |2.5 years       |miles                            

CID Special vehicle     |70-100,000      |80,000 miles/   |100,000 miles/  |70,000 miles/   |100,000 miles/  |80,000 miles                     

                        |miles           |3 years         |3 years         |3 years         |2 years                                           

Special Vehicle         |70-100,000      |Dependent on age|5-7 years       |Dependent on    |150,000 miles/  |80,000 miles                     

                        |miles           |and condition                    |age and con-    |10 years                                          

                                                                           |dition                                                             

Motor-cycle                              |80,000 miles/                    |80,000 miles/   |45,000 miles/   |65,000 miles                     

                                         |6 years                          |4 years         |4 years                                           

Where no age criterion is given, forces replace vehicles on the basis of mileage alone. Each force reviews its policy regularly to take account of operating experience and other factors.

Data Protection

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he will make arrangements for the Data Protection Registrar to inspect relevant contracts with suppliers of information technology services that involve the use of personal data held by his Department in order to check whether all appropriate arrangements in relation to the Data Protection Act 1984 have been made, and whether such contracts make provisions for the registrar to make random inspections in order to check the suppliers in compliance with the eighth data protection principle.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : The Data Protection Registrar has a wide range of powers under the Data Protection Act 1984 to ensure that all individuals and organisations holding personal data on computer systems are registered and observe the data protection principles as required by the Act. When IT services are contracted out by a data user, the contractor and the user will be subject to the application of the data protection principles, and to the registrar's powers to promote compliance with them, as provided for in the Act. It is for the registrar to decide how he will use his


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powers under the Act, and I do not consider that any further arrangements are necessary for him to discharge his duties effectively.

Prisons (Foreign Nationals)

Mr. Cox : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the policy of his Department in seeking to give specialist training to prison officers whose work involves them with foreign nationals serving prison sentences in prisons in England and Wales ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : There is no formal specialist training provided centrally for those working with foreign nationals, but all new officers receive race relations training which includes awareness of minority cultural, linguistic, spiritual and dietary needs. Responsibility for meeting the needs of foreign nationals is often co-ordinated by the race relations management team and liaison officers in establishments. Information on "best practice" in relation to foreign prisoners has been disseminated through the Race Relations Liaison Officers' Newsletter and their 1993 national conference.

Training has been provided in this area for all staff at HM Prison Haslar (a specialised detention facility for deportees) by Prison Service College consultants.


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There has also been a number of other initiatives to assist those working with foreign prisoners including translating the prisoners' information pack into 14 lanugauges ; support for the Nuffield interpreters project to encourage accredited interpreters ; introducing Language Line, a telephone interpreting service, into all prisons ; and publication of the foreign prisoners' resource pack to provide information and guidance for staff working with foreign nationals, and the prisoners themselves.

Ethnic Minority Grants

Mrs. Anne Campbell : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how he proposes to meet the shortfall in services caused by the proposed cuts in section 11 funding.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Following discussions with local authorities, section 11 grant will now be distributed as a cash sum, rather than a percentage of expenditure. This will ensure maximum take-up of available funding, and it remains open to local authorities to provide additional resources in the light of their assessment of relative local priorities.

Immigration Guidelines

Mr. Allen : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will now publish his Department's guidelines for immigration officers.

Mr. Charles Wardle : No. It is not the normal practice to publish internal instructions.

Paramilitaries

Mr. Barnes : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list all members of (a) proscribed loyalist and (b) proscribed republican organisations who are convicted prisoners in custody in England and Wales, giving in each case the date of their original conviction, their offence or offences, the length of sentence given and their paramilitary affiliation.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Mr. A Butler to Mr. Harry Barnes, dated 18 January 1994 :


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The Home Secretary has asked me, in the absence of the Director General from the office, to reply to your recent Question asking for details of convicted prisoners in custody in England and Wales who are members of proscribed organisations.

It is not the practice to discuss the claimed or suspected affiliation of individual prisoners to particular organisations.

Leave to Remain

Mr. Darling : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out his policy for issuing travel documents to individuals who have been granted exceptional leave to remain in the United Kingdom ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Charles Wardle : I refer to my reply to my hon. and learned Friend the Member for Burton (Sir I. Lawrence) on 16 December at column 791, which indicated that officials were writing that day setting out changes to be introduced on 1 January. A copy of the letter was placed in the Library. The new arrangements clarify policy and practice in the issue of Home Office travel documents, including the issue of documents to those granted exceptional leave to remain in the United Kingdom.

Mr. Darling : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is his policy with regard to allowing re-entry to the United Kingdom to those individuals who have been granted exceptional leave to remain in the United Kingdom and have been granted a travel document, and who then seek to re-enter the United Kingdom ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Charles Wardle : A person granted exceptional leave to remain will normally be re-admitted on return to the United Kingdom before the expiry of the period granted if the immigration officer is satisfied that the circumstances which led to the granting of that leave still apply.

Crime Statistics

Mr. Hain : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what were the numbers of (a) recorded crime, per police officer, (b) recorded crime per 100,000 population for each year since 1979 for the South Wales, Thames Valley, Kent, Lancashire, Avon and Somerset and Hampshire police areas ; and what were the comparable totals for all non- metropolitan and Welsh non-metropolitan police authorities.

Mr. Maclean : The information requested is contained in the following table :


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Notifiable offences recorded by the police                                                                                                         

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recorded crimes per police officer<1>                                                                                                              

South Wales                               |21    |23    |24    |27    |27    |29    |30    |33    |33    |35    |35    |42    |49    |51           

Thames Valley                             |26    |23    |25    |28    |28    |30    |31    |33    |32    |29    |32    |39    |49    |50           

Kent                                      |18    |17    |18    |21    |21    |23    |24    |24    |25    |25    |26    |32    |43    |49           

Lancashire                                |16    |16    |18    |20    |20    |22    |22    |24    |25    |26    |24    |29    |33    |35           

Avon and Somerset                         |17    |18    |20    |22    |22    |24    |26    |30    |32    |31    |31    |40    |48    |55           

Hampshire                                 |21    |20    |23    |25    |25    |27    |28    |30    |30    |28    |30    |36    |43    |45           

                                                                                                                                                   

Total non-metropolitan                                                                                                                             

England and Wales                         |19    |19    |21    |23    |24    |25    |26    |28    |28    |27    |29    |35    |41    |44           

Wales only                                |19    |19    |21    |23    |24    |25    |26    |28    |29    |29    |29    |34    |40    |42           

                                                                                                                                                   

Recorded crimes per 100,000 population<1>                                                                                                          

South Wales                               |5,077 |5,432 |5,749 |6,468 |6,543 |7,089 |7,191 |8,089 |8,222 |8,576 |8,617 |10,205|11,932|12,355       

Thames Valley                             |4,079 |3,960 |4,267 |4,798 |4,941 |5,347 |5,607 |6,057 |5,968 |5,481 |6,060 |7,446 |9,340 |9,938        

Kent                                      |3,500 |3,463 |3,468 |4,195 |4,152 |4,427 |4,670 |4,762 |4,926 |4,936 |5,231 |6,509 |8,797 |10,102       

Lancashire                                |3,777 |3,739 |4,120 |4,720 |4,689 |4,927 |4,947 |5,390 |5,854 |6,041 |5,587 |6,686 |7,600 |8,209        

Avon and Somerset                         |3,616 |4,065 |4,500 |4,922 |4,814 |5,277 |5,656 |6,529 |7,012 |6,788 |6,895 |8,784 |10,662|12,075       

Hampshire                                 |3,941 |3,912 |4,391 |4,886 |4,901 |5,175 |5,373 |5,603 |5,755 |5,351 |5,716 |6,966 |8,360 |8,770        

                                                                                                                                                   

Total non-metropolitan                                                                                                                             

England and Wales                         |3,881 |4,022 |4,395 |4,859 |4,875 |5,180 |5,388 |5,726 |5,908 |5,712 |5,948 |7,293 |8,673 |9,353        

Wales only                                |4,234 |4,407 |4,700 |5,237 |5,340 |5,783 |5,941 |6,403 |6,570 |6,583 |6,496 |7,625 |9,043 |9,602        

<1> Excluding offences of criminal damage value £20 and under.                                                                                     

South Wales Police

Mr. Hain : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the basis for the categorisation this coming year of South Wales as a semi-rural police authority.

Mr. Charles Wardle : Concentration of population is one of a number of factors which have been used in reaching decisions on the allocation of increases in police force establishments. As my right hon. Friend has made clear, however, available resources will not allow for further increases to establishments in 1994-95.

Secure Training Centres

Mr. Michael : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what is his target date for the opening of each of his proposed secure training centres ;

(2) what target date he has set by which he intends that all five secure training centres shall be open and accepting referrals.

Mr. Maclean : The centres will open as soon as possible after Royal Assent to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Bill.

Mr. Michael : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his answer of 17 December, Official Report, column 952, whether he will now identify the region in which each of his five proposed secure training centres is to be sited and list the counties to be served in each case.

Mr. Maclean : Final decisions have not yet been reached. The notice recently placed in the Official Journal of the European Community invited expressions of interest from companies to finance, design, build/refurbish, operate and maintain secure training centres either on Home Office land or on alternative sites which they would themselves propose. The deadline for receipt of applications is 11 February 1994.

Mr. Michael : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether all the running costs of his proposed secure training centres will be met by his Department.

Mr. Maclean : Running costs will be met by the contractor(s), who will be reimbursed by the Home Office.

Electoral Registration

Mr. Matthew Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people under the age of 25 years are not included in the electoral register.


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Mr. Peter Lloyd : Information on the number of people under 25 included in, or missing from, the electoral register is not collected. However, research carried out by the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys after the 1991 Census suggested that approximately 12.1 per cent. of people aged 18-19, 19.5 per cent. of people aged 20 and 20.6 per cent. of people aged 21-24 were missing from the register.

Mr. Matthew Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much his Department is spending on (a) electoral registration in the United Kingdom, (b) electoral registration of EC nationals in the United Kingdom and (c) electoral registration of overseas voters.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Electoral registration officers are appointed by district and London borough councils in England and Wales and receive their funding through their local authority. The Home Office undertakes an annual publicity campaign in support of electoral registration in England and Wales. Some £620,000 has been spent on television advertising in support of the canvass for the 1994-95 electoral register. We have no plans for expenditure on overseas electors publicity. We are currently considering ways of letting European Community nationals know about their new voting rights.

Schools-Police Liaison Service

Mr. Morgan : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consultations he has had with the chairman of the South Wales police authority in relation to the priority to be given to the schools-police liaison service in the forthcoming financial year.

Mr. Charles Wardle : None.

Mr. Morgan : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police authorities operate a schools-police liaision authority.

Mr. Charles Wardle : Information is not held centrally in the form requested. Arrangements for police liaison with schools are the responsibility of chief officers of police. Some police forces have dedicated schools liaison personnel, others employ officers with wider youth and community liaison duties to undertake schools liaison.

Mr. Morgan : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received in relation to the schools-police liaison service of the South Wales police authority.

Mr. Charles Wardle : None.


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Child Cruelty

Mr. Michael : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when and where he first announced his intention to extend the prosecution right of appeal to cases of child cruelty and indecent assault ; and if he will list the occasions on which he has since made a similar announcement (a) to the House, (b) via Home Office press release, statement or communication or (c) otherwise.

Mr. Maclean : My right hon. and learned Friend first announced the Government's intention to extend the scope of the Attorney-General's power to refer unduly lenient sentences to the Court of Appeal in a speech at the Conservative party conference on 6 October. Since then, my right hon. and learned Friend has referred to this intention on a number of occasions in response to questions from hon. Members and the public, and in explaining the Government's overall strategy on law and order. On Thursday 13 January this year the Home Office public relations branch issued a press release giving further details of the offences to be covered and the proposed date of implementation, to coincide with the answer my right hon. and learned Friend gave in the House on that day to my hon. Friend the Member for Amber Valley (Mr. Oppenheim).

Deported Jamaicans

Mr. Madden : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the total cost, including plane charter, of returning to Jamaica on 25 December 1993, Jamaican nationals refused entry to the United Kingdom on 21 December 1993.

Mr. Charles Wardle [holding answer 11 January 1994] : The figure was £126,765, including the cost of the charter and of in- flight escorts but excluding the cost of in-country escorts which have yet to be finalised.

Peanut Allergy

Sir Cranley Onslow : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many deaths are known to have been caused in England and Wales by peanut-related food allergy in each of the past 10 years.

Mr. Sackville : I have been asked to reply.

For the latest 10 years, 1983 to 1992, for which data are available, there were no deaths registered where allergy to peanuts was the assigned underlying cause.

Fine Defaulters

Mr. William Ross : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average prison sentence imposed for defaulting on a fine ; what is the average period actually spent in prison by such a defaulter ; and what is the average cost of such a person's imprisonment.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.


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Letter from Mr. D. Lewis to Mr. William Ross, dated 18 January 1994 :

Fine Defaulters

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking about the average prison sentence imposed for defaulting on a fine ; the average period actually spent in prison by such a defaulter ; and the average cost of such a person's imprisonment. The latest available information is for 1992 when the average length of sentence imposed for fine default in Prison Service establishments in England and Wales was 22 days. The average period served was 7.5 days. Information relating to the average cost of imprisonment specifically for fine defaulters is not available. The average net operating cost for prisoners in local prisons and remand centres in 1992/93, however, was £526 per week.

Community Charge (Fines)

Ms Walley : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give figures for April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November and December of the number of people imprisoned for non- payment of outstanding community charge and in each case specify the length and cost per person of imprisonment ; and what proportion of those imprisoned are in receipt of benefit.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Ms Joan Walley, dated 13 January 1994 :

Non Payment of Outstanding Community Charge--

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the number of people imprisoned in April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November and December for non-payment of outstanding community charge, and for each case the length and cost per person of imprisonment and what proportion of those imprisoned are in receipt of benefit.

Provisional data is given in the attached table for the months April to October 1993. Because of the number of cases identified it is not possible to detail the length of sentence imposed in each case. Information relating to the cost per person of imprisonment specifically for these cases is not available. The average net operating cost for prisoners in local prisons and remand centres in 1992/3, however, was £526 per week. The average sentence applied was 34 days of which just under half would normally be served. Information on the proportion of those imprisoned who are in receipt of benefit is not available centrally.


Receptions into Prison    

Service establishments in 

England and Wales for     

non-payment of community  

charge<1>: April-October  

1993                      

Month     |Number         

--------------------------

April     |25             

May       |28             

June      |21             

July      |36             

August    |35             

September |27             

October   |35             

          |-------        

Total     |207            

<1> Includes small        

numbers recorded as       

non-payment of rates.     


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WALES

Health Service

Mr. Ieuan Wyn Jones : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what steps employees in Wales of health service bodies, local authorities or voluntary organisations may take to raise concerns relating to patient or client treatment, to malpractice or to fraud.

Mr. Gwilym Jones : In the NHS, employees are encouraged to take up their concerns through all levels of management within the employing authority or NHS trust in accordance with local procedures designed to ensure such concerns are dealt with fairly and thoroughly. A copy of guidance issued last June is in the Library of the House. Every local authority has to appoint a monitoring officer who has a duty to prepare a report to the authority if it appears to him/her that an action or omission by the authority is or is likely to be illegal or amount to maladministration. The authority must consider his/her report before deciding what action to take. A local authority's chief finance officer has a similar duty with regard to matters of financial propriety. An employee of an authority could bring his or her concerns to the attention of the monitoring officer or the chief finance officer.

It is also open to any person, including employees of a particular local authority, to approach the independent external auditor appointed by the Audit Commission to that particular authority.


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No central guidance has been issued to voluntary organisations. Since these are independent, employees are bound by the terms of their contracts of employment.

Schools Inspection

Mr. Dafis : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what percentage of the difference between the total value of the tenders placed in the financial year 1993-94 for the inspection of secondary schools in Wales and the sum of £933,000 transferred from the rate support grant to county councils to the Office of Her Majesty's chief inspector for Wales was spent on appointing staff to the office of Her Majesty's chief inspector for Wales.

Sir Wyn Roberts : None of the money transferred from the revenue support grant to the office of Her Majesty's chief inspector of schools in Wales was spent on appointing staff to that office.

National Museum of Wales

Mr. Faulds : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will publish the attendance figures for 1993 reported by the National Museum of Wales, including its outstations, with the percentage increase or decrease on the attendance figures for 1992.

Sir Wyn Roberts : A total of 951,982 people visitedthe National Museum of Wales during 1993, an increase of 9.7 per cent. over the attendance reported for 1992.


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Amgueddfa Genedlaethol Cymru-National Museum of Wales                                            

Twelve months review-January to December 1993-Visitors numbers                                   

Branch                                         |Actual   |1992     |1992     |Variance           

                                                                             |per cent.          

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Main Building, Cathays Park                    |266,743  |255,601  |11,142   |4.4                

Welsh Folk Museum, St. Fagans                  |413,840  |349,164  |64,676   |18.5               

Amgueddfar Gogledd, Llanberis                  |77,079   |77,082   |(3)      |0.0                

Welsh Industrial and Maritime Museum           |67,971   |66,521   |1,450    |2.2                

Roman Legionary Museum, Caerleon               |47,181   |39,079   |8,102    |20.7               

Museum of the Welsh Woollen Industry, Dre-fach |23,026   |21,835   |1,191    |5.5                

Segontium Roman Fort Museum                    |10,571   |10,127   |444      |4.4                

Graham Sutherland Gallery                      |10,551   |10,457   |94       |0.9                

Turner House, Penarth                          |10,855   |13,012   |(2,157)  |(16.6)             

Welsh Slate Museum                             |24,165   |25,065   |(900)    |(3.6)              

                                               |----     |----     |----     |----               

  Total                                        |951,982  |867,943  |84,039   |9.7                

Ambulance Staff

Mr. Ieuan Wyn Jones : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he will make it his policy to ensure that health authorities and ambulance trusts in Wales make arrangements to allow ambulance personnel to retire at age 55 years.

Mr. Gwilym Jones : My right hon. Friend is to consider what arrangements might be introduced to facilitate the early retirement of long -serving ambulance staff in Wales.

SCOTLAND

Rural Medical Care

Mr. Macdonald : To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will publish the report of the review of medical care in rural Scotland, chaired by Sir Thomas Thomson.


Column 484

Mr. Stewart : The report of the working party has not yet been received, but it is understood that it is at final draft stage and will be submitted early next month. It will thereafter be considered and a decision taken about publication.

Government Papers

Mr. McFall : To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what plans he has to introduce legislation applying to Scotland similar to the 30-year rule regarding the release of Government and Cabinet papers.

Mr. Salmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what plans he has for introducing legislation to provide for the public release of Scottish Office governmental papers ; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton : Scottish Office papers have for many years been released as a matter of course under arrangements which mirror administratively


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those which apply statutorily in England and Wales. I have no plans at present to place the system on a statutory footing.

Glenochil Prison

Mr. McFall : To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland who granted permission for the visit in December 1993 of Mr. Roger Kendrick, former governor, and Mr. Walter Litherard to Glenochil prison ; and how many staff and prisoners they interviewed.


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