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Letter from D. W. Gallagher to Mr. William Ross, dated 26 January 1994 :

You recently asked a Parliamentary Question about the locations and rateable values of eel fisheries in Northern Ireland. As I am responsible for the Rate Collection Agency (RCA), the body to which the rates are paid, the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland has asked me to reply.

There are three entries in the Valuation List relating to eel fisheries, all of which refer to Toome Eel Fishery (NI) Ltd., but which fall into three separate districts.

Under Article 17 of the Rates (Northern Ireland) Order 1977, Eel and Salmon Fisheries are currently derated by 60 per cent. which in effect means that rates are chargeable on only 40 per cent. of the Net Annual Value. This is outlined in the table below


Address                |Net annual  |RV on which |District                 

                       |value       |rates are   |council area             

                                    |chargeable                            

                       |£           |£                                     

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Toome Eel Fishery                                                          

 (NI) Ltd.                                                                 

Toome Eel Fishery                                                          

 (PT)                  |4,800       |1,920       |Ballymoney               

Portna                                                                     

 & Movanagher                                                              

Toome Eel Fishery                                                          

 (NI) Ltd.                                                                 

Toome Eel Fishery                                                          

 (PT)                  |12,500      |5,000       |Magherafelt              

Portna & Toome                                                             

Toome Eel Fishery                                                          

 (NI) Ltd.             |500         |200         |Coleraine                

Toome Eel Fishery (PT)                                                     

Movanagher                                                                 

Should you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact me.

AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES AND FOOD

Upland Areas (Assistance)

Mr. David Nicholson : To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if she will list the total value of all assistance to agriculture in the upland areas of England in each year since 1987, including environmental assistance, capital grants and sheep and livestock subsidies.

Mr. Jack : The information is set out in the table. For the purposes of this exercise "upland areas" are defined as less-favoured areas.


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Assistance paid to farmers in upland areas of England (Uplands defined as less-favoured areas)                                 

                                               |1987     |1988     |1989     |1990     |1991     |1992     |1993               

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Environmentally sensitive areas<6>             |1,146    |2,470    |2,615    |2,653    |2,716    |4,120    |8,194              

Capital grants<4>                              |9,900    |9,500    |11,100   |10,900   |10,700   |8,500    |4,100              

Hill livestock compensatory allowance                                                                                          

scheme (HCLAs)                                 |28,439   |29,007   |30,045   |32,503   |37,237   |38,374   |<2>33,126          

Sheep annual premium scheme (SAPs)<3>          |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |57,491   |92,724   |92,049             

Farm woodland scheme<1>                        |n/a      |n/a      |14       |20       |32       |38       |45                 

Farm woodland premium scheme<1>                |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |34                 

Five year set aside<5>                         |n/a      |n/a      |255      |350      |600      |700      |460                

Pilot beef and sheep extensification scheme<5> |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |100      |100      |100                

Beef special premium scheme<8>                 |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a                

Beef variable premium scheme<8>                |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a                

Suckler cow premium scheme<7>                  |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |12,040   |14,487   |15,612   |n/a                

Sheep variable premium scheme<8>               |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a      |n/a                

<1> Farm woodland premium scheme succeeded farm woodland scheme on 1 April 1992.                                               

<2> January to October.                                                                                                        

<3> Under the sheep annual premium scheme, SAPs, premium is payable to farmers in both uplands and lowlands areas. It is not   

possible to ascertain how much of the premium expenditure for years prior to 1991 went to farmers in upland areas, as the      

less-favoured area-LFA supplement was not introduced until the 1991 scheme. The figures for the sheep annual premium scheme    

relate to payments for that year's scheme. Payments are staged and extend into the following year.                             

<4> The various schemes under which grant has been paid are: agriculture and horticulture development scheme, farm and         

horticulture development scheme, agriculture and horticulture development scheme, agriculture improvement scheme, farm         

diversification scheme, farm and conservation grant scheme.                                                                    

<5> Estimated expenditure                                                                                                      

<6> Includes, Pennine Dales, Clun, North Peak, Exmoor, Lake District, Southwest Peak, West Penwith ESAs. Payments relate to    

the cost of agreements made on the basis of applications submitted in the year shown.                                          

<7> For 1987, 1988, 1989 and 1993 assistance given to upland areas is not separately identifiable.                             

<8> No differentiation is made under these schemes between upland/lowland producers.                                           

n/a = Not available.                                                                                                           

Consultants

Dr. Wright : To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food on which occasions since 1979 her Department has employed the services of external consultants ; and if she will give details of the purposes for which they were employed and the cost of employing them.

Mr. Jack : The annual costs of external consultants employed by the Department--excluding agencies--since 1984-85 are set out. The precise number of contracts, details of the purposes for which they were employed and data for earlier years can be provided only at disproportionate cost.


Financial year |Expenditure                  

               |(£)                          

---------------------------------------------

1984-85        |<1>27,110                    

1985-86        |<1>174,724                   

1986-87        |<1>135,279                   

1987-88        |<1>44,015                    

1988-89        |1,174,114                    

1989-90        |2,972,150                    

1990-91        |4,495,793                    

1991-92        |5,374,284                    

1992-93        |7,010,814                    

<1> Excludes computer consultants.           

Wool Marketing Scheme

Sir David Steel : To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if she will make a statement on the future of the British wool marketing scheme.

Mr. Jack : The Government believe that the British wool marketing scheme continues to operate in the interests of producers, consumers and the industry and consequently are not planning to abolish it. The British Wool Marketing Board is currently considering amendments to the operation of scheme following the ending of the wool guarantee. These amendments will have to be approved by producers before the Government can arrange for their enactment in secondary legislation.

Arable Area Payments

Mr. Anthony Coombs : To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what were the numbers of applications and the area applied for under the arable area payments scheme in England in 1993 ; how the total area applied for compares with the regional base area ; and whether there are any plans for changes in the regional base area for 1994.


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Mrs. Gillian Shephard : Over 46,000 applications covering over 3.5 million hectares were received. Details of the applications and a comparison with the base area are set out.

We are asking the Commission to establish a separate base area for maize, excluding sweetcorn, in England in 1994. This would mean that arable producers would not be penalised by the recent and continuing expansion in production of forage maize for silage by livestock producers. Should maize production exceed the base area, maize producers would be subject to an in- year reduction in arable area payments and additional uncompensated set- aside the following year, if they wished to continue to claim under the main scheme. The changes to the rules on base area I negotiated at the December Agriculture Council mean that maize producers would be penalised only if both the regional maize base area and the total of the regional base areas for both maize and for other crops were exceeded. Arable area payments are, of course intended to compensate farmers for the reductions in cereal prices agreed as part of common agricultural policy reform. Producers of forage maize for silage have not suffered from the reductions. Indeed, as livestock producers, they have benefited as cereals are a major input into feed. Many will also be in receipt of livestock subsidies.

Further changes to the base area will need to include linseed, which comes fully into the arable area payments scheme in 1994, and to exclude vining peas, which are no longer eligible for aid. The expected base area figures are shown in the table :


                                   |Number             

-------------------------------------------------------

Numbers of applications                                

Main scheme                        |27,248             

Simplified scheme                  |19,006             

                                   |---                

Total                              |46,254             

                                                       

Area applied for-ha                                    

Main Scheme:                       |3,361,589          

                                                       

Cereals and sweetcorn              |2,173,529          

  of which: maize                  |34,804             

Oilseeds                           |316,170            

Proteins                           |220,853            

  of which: vining peas            |29,782             

Linseed                            |152,990            

Set-aside                          |498,046            

  of which: growing non-food crops |49,870             

                                                       

Simplified scheme:                 |225,857            

                                                       

Cereals                            |220,565            

  of which: maize                  |19,553             

Oilseeds                           |1,844              

Proteins                           |3,449              

  of which: Vining peas            |214                

                                   |----               

Grand Total                        |3,587,446          


Comparison with Base Area (ha)                                         

                                                   |Number             

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

                                                                       

(excluding vining peas and linseed)                |3,404,460          

Area in five-year set-aside                        |106,897            

Eligible crops claimed as forage area              |91,159             

  of which: maize                                  |15,026             

                                                   |----               

Total                                              |3,602,516          

Base area                                          |3,742,422          

Base area less total                               |139,906            


 

Proposed Revised Base Area (    

hectares)                       

(Subject to Commission          

approval)                       

            |Number             

--------------------------------

Maize       |33,226             

Other crops |3,761,366          

            |----               

Total       |3,794,592          

Flash Floods

Mr. Barry Field : To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what advice her department gives to farmers to avoid soil erosion in flash floods.

Mrs. Shephard : My Department published the code of good agricultural practice for the protection of soil in December last year.

The code provides practical guidance to help farmers and growers avoid causing long-term damage to the soil and specifically deals with techniques to combat soil erosion caused by water.

Copies of the soil code have been placed in the Library of the House.

DUCHY OF LANCASTER

Technology Foresight

Dr. Moonie : To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster how many technology foresight panels he expects to appoint ; what industrial or technological sectors they will cover ; what their timetable is for reporting to the technology foresight steering group ; and when he expects their final report to be published.

Mr. Waldegrave : The foresight steering group, chaired by the chief scientific adviser, is meeting on 11 February to decide its advice to me on these issues. I will make an announcement soon after that about how the technology foresight programme will be taken forward during 1994.

Research and Development

Dr. Moonie : To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster what is the timetable for the completion and publication of the 1994 forward look and annual review of Government-funded research and development.


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Mr. Waldegrave : The 1994 forward look of Government-funded science and technology will be published in April. Statistical tables previously produced in the annual review of Government-funded research and development will continue to be published in the form of a statistical supplement to the new forward look.

EDUCATION

Education Support and Training Grants

Mr. Vaz : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what total amount of funding has been made available over the last year under the grants for education support and training.

Mr. Forth : The 1993-94 grants for education support and training GEST programme supports local education authority expenditure of £320.2 million. Central Government grant is in most cases paid at the rate of 60 per cent. of this expenditure.

Mr. Vaz : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will itemise the expenditure on the administration of grants for education support and training, including printing, advertising and stationery costs as well as worker expenses (a) over the last year and (b) since the scheme was developed.

Mr. Forth : The information requested is not collected centrally.

Voluntary-aided Schools (Capital Grants)

Mr. Pawsey : To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what amount and percentage of underspending or overspending has occurred on capital grants to voluntary-aided schools for building work in each of the last three completed financial years ; whether his Department has reviewed the reasons for any marked or persistent underspending ; and whether there are reasons to expect either underspending or overspending to be reported for 1993-94 ; (2) what amount and percentage of underspending or overspending has occurred on capital grants to voluntary-aided schools for repair work in each of the last three completed financial years ; whether his Department has reviewed the reasons for any marked or persistent underspending ; and whether there are reasons to expect either underspending or overspending to be reported for 1993-94.

Mr. Forth : Details of aided school capital and repair grant estimates, final outturn and percentage under-overspend from 1990-91 to 1992-93 are as follows :


Year          |Estimate     |Outturn      |Percentage                 

              |£ million    |£ million    |under/                     

                                          |overspend                  

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Repairs                                                               

1990-91       |35.0         |41.8         |19 overspend               

1991-92       |47.5         |49.1         |3  overspend               

1992-93       |55.0         |36.8         |33 underspend              

                                                                      

              |Capital                                                

1990-91       |71.0         |64.0         |10 underspend              

1991-92       |84.2         |63.9         |24 underspend              

1992-93       |96.6         |81.3         |16 underspend              


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The overall outturn for both programmes for 1990-91 and the two previous years was broadly in balance with the estimate. The main reasons for the recent underspend on the capital programme appear to be attributable to the economic recession, in particular the inability of some governing bodies to fund their 15 per cent. contribution, lower than estimated tender costs and delays caused by contractor liquidations.

The Department is revising its approval, monitoring and in-year reallocation procedures. Expenditure in 1993-94 so far suggests a small overspend on the capital progamme balanced by a corresponding underspend on repairs. However, the predictive value of expenditure so far is limited because a very high proportion of claims are usually submitted in the last two months of the financial year.

School Transport (Accidents)

Mr. Gordon Prentice : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what measures he intends to bring forward to help prevent or mitigate accidents involving school transport.

Mr. Forth : Advice on this matter is available in the 1991 report from the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents, endorsed by this Department and distributed to all local education authorities and schools. We are keeping relevant issues under review, in close collaboration with the Department of Transport, which also has relevant responsibilities, but have no immediate proposals for further action.

Further Education Funding Council

Mrs. Ann Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to his answer of 18 January, Official Report, columns 545-48, if he will publish further details of the preparatory costs incurred in the establishment of the Further Education Funding Council.

Mr. Boswell : The information is follows :


                                             |£ million          

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Running costs                                |4.0                

Consultancies                                |1.8                

Payments to assist colleges' preparation for                     

 independence                                |18.6               

                                             |--                 

Total                                        |24.4               

HEALTH

Junior Doctors

Ms. Primarolo : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans she has to provide guidelines for accommodation for junior doctors.

Dr. Mawhinney : Advice on living conditions for junior doctors was issued as part of the new deal guidance in June 1991, copies of which are available in the Library. I have asked the national health service to treat improvements in this area as a priority. We have no plans to issue further guidance.


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Health Service Employees

Mr. Spellar : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what disciplinary measures are available against health service employees responsible for making unauthorised payments.

Dr. Mawhinney : Disciplinary procedures for health service staff employed on national terms and conditions of service are governed by section 40 of the General Whitley Council handbook, a copy of which is available in the Library. This provides a framework within which employing authorities determine local disciplinary procedures. Under the 1990 National Health Service and Community Care Act, NHS trusts have the freedom to establish their own disciplinary procedures. The question of whether or not to take disciplinary action, and its severity, is entirely a matter for each health employer.

Departmental Cars

Mr. Blunkett : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what guidelines are applied to the use of official cars for personal purposes by Department of Health staff or Ministers ; and who originate these guidelines ;

(2) what arrangements exist within her Department for reimbursement by Ministers of the cost of private use of official cars.

Mr. Sackville : Official cars may not be used for personal purposes except during the working week when the effect is a saving of time for use on official duties or for security reasons.

Mental Health

Ms Jowell : To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many districts have a 24-hour, seven-day crisis intervention service provided by experienced mental health workers.

Mr. Bowis : All district health authorities are required to have psychiatrists approved under section 12 of the Mental Health Act 1983 available and similarly all local authorities are required to have approved social workers. Dedicated crisis intervention services are in place where assessed needs suggest this is a cost-effective way of providing services.

Ms Jowell : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of staff in mental health units are trained to provide (a) case management, (b) community crisis intervention, (c) home-based care and (d) normalised day care.

Mr. Bowis : Mental health staff are expected to be able to work in a variety of service settings and to provide a range of services to patients. It is a matter for local health authorities to decide on training strategies.

Hospital Hostel Beds

Ms Jowell : To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many districts have hospital hostel beds.

Mr. Bowis : We encourage the provision of hospital hostels where they are appropriate for local needs but we do not record their provision centrally.


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Respite Beds

Ms Jowell : To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many districts provide crisis diversion and respite beds in the community or in the hospital.

Mr. Bowis : Health authorities do not usually earmark beds. It is more efficient to use them in a flexible way.

NHS Private Beds

Ms Primarolo : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what plans she has to collect and publish data on private beds in the NHS in the years after 1990-91 ;

(2) how many individual NHS/pay bed units there were in each region including special health authorities in each of the last five years ; and how many pay beds there were in these units in each of those regions in each of the last five years ;

(3) how many authorised pay beds there were in 1991-92 in (a) special health authorities, (b) in each region and (c) in England as a whole.

Mr. Sackville : Trusts do not "authorise" pay beds and therefore we no longer collect authorised pay bed numbers. Private patient income is recorded in the summarised accounts of health authorities and trusts. This information is used to monitor the extent of private patient activity.

GP Fundholders

Ms Primarolo : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what is the time scale for producing finally audited figures on fundholding expenditure for 1992-93.

Dr. Mawhinney : Arrangements for audit are made locally. It is for family health services authorities and the Audit Commission to agree the timetable for completing the audit of general practitioner fundholder accounts.

GP Fundholding

Mr. Nicholas Winterton : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many non-fund-holding practices operating in the area covered by the Macclesfield constituency have declared an interest in becoming fundholding ;

(2) how many (a) fundholding and (b) non-fundholding general practitioner practices operate in the area covered by the Macclesfield parliamentary constituency.

Dr. Mawhinney : Regional health authorities are responsible for managing the general practitioner fundholding scheme in their areas. Nationally, 25 per cent. of the population is covered by GP fundholders. In Mersey region, this is 35 per cent. Information by constituency is not available and could be determined only at disproportionate cost.

Child Minding

Mr. Wilshire : To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will set up an investigation into the adequacy of current child minding regulations and the competence of Surrey county council's social services department following the verdict in the case of Thomas Harrison v. Surrey county council and Mrs. Christine Walton ; and if she will make a statement.

Mr. Bowis : The events in this case took place in 1989, and the Children Act 1989, which came into force in


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October 1991, contains updated and effective provisions which enable local authorities to regulate childminders, so that children are protected from harm. I understand that Surrey county council has now reorganised its registration service, and has asked the area child protection committee to conduct a multi-agency review into all the circumstances surrounding the case to ensure that all the lessons have been learned. The Department's social services inspectorate is monitoring this.

Hospitals

Mr. Blunkett : To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many hospitals there were in England in (a) 1992 and (b) 1993.

Mr. Sackville : The available information is shown in the table. Prior to April 1991, a count of the number of individual units supplying activity data provided an estimate of the number of hospitals. The creation of trusts and directly managed units means that from 1991-92 this information is no longer held centrally.


Number of providers submitting data for 1991-92    

and 1992-93                                        

                           |1991-92|1992-93        

---------------------------------------------------

Directly managed units     |389    |278            

NHS trusts                 |53     |141            

Special health authorities |8      |8              

                           |---    |---            

  Total                    |450    |427            

Note: The count includes all providers who         

submitted data for wards                           

open day and night, 24 hours, and/or wards open in 

the day only.                                      

Birth Defects

Mr. Mandelson : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what information is currently available about the environmental pollution or other causes which might provide an explanation of the incidence of babies being born with deformed or missing hands ;

(2) what resources she has made available to local health authorities or to the Medical Research Council, or both, in their examination of babies born with deformed or missing hands ; (3) if she will order a full Government investigation into the incidence of babies being born with deformed or missing hands in coastal areas ; and if she will make a statement.

Mr. Sackville : Limb deformities which have occurred in babies born in coastal areas have been the subject of preliminary local investigation. Local inquiries of this kind form part of the public health functions of the health authorities concerned, which are funded as a matter of course. There is no evidence to suggest that the incidence of limb defects in these places is any higher than might occur by chance. Nor is there any information to suggest that environmental pollution might be the cause. Clinicians in Hampshire have been in touch informally with officers of the Medical Research Council's epidemiology unit at Southampton. Any further developments will be monitored closely.

Mr. Boyes : To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will institute an investigation into the problem of children being born with one hand only ; if she will institute


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an investigation into the problems of children with any other generalised deformities of the body ; and if she will make a statement.

Mr. Sackville : A national system for monitoring and detecting any increase in the prevalence of congenital malformations co-ordinated by the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys has been in place for the last 30 years. We are aware of particular local investigations which are taking place into the reasons for limb deformities. It would be inappropriate to speculate further until these have been completed.

Form AG3

Dr. Spink : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans she has to simplify form AG3, with regard to sight tests, glasses and contact lenses ; and if she will make a statement.

Dr. Mawhinney : The style and content of form AG3 are kept under review and changes to improve effectiveness and clarity are made whenever it is feasible to do so.

Public Bodies

Mr. Kilfoyle : To ask the Secretary of State for Health who are the members currently appointed to the Pharmacists Review Body.

Dr. Mawhinney : The Pharmacists Review Panel is chaired by Mr. J. Keir QC, a former joint secretary of Unilever plc. Its members are Mr. W. G. K. Carter CBE, partner, Price Waterhouse and Co. ; Mr. J. F. H. Pease- Watkin, former personnel director, Bowater Corporation ; and Mr. J. R. Sargent CBE, former group economic adviser, Midland bank.

Vicky Rimmer

Mr. Blunkett : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what information has been sought by officials of her Department from doctors treating Vicky Rimmer at the Walton hospital in Liverpool.

Mr. Sackville : It is not our practice to make such inquiries. The treatment of individual patients is a matter for their clinicians.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

Mr. Blunkett : To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what scientific research is being funded by her Department into possible links between Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and bovine spongiform encephalopathy ;

(2) whether she will establish an independent inquiry into possible links between Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and BSE.

Mr. Sackville : Doctors are asked to report every suspected case of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, (CJD), to the national Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease surveillance unit in Edinburgh, funded jointly by the Department and the Scottish Office. The unit is headed by Dr. Robert Will, consultant neurologist at Edinburgh's Western general hospital. The circumstances of each case are recorded fully and in particular all cases are examined for possible sources of transmission and any occupational factor. The


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unit was established in 1990 and provided reports in 1992 and 1993, copies of which are readily available to the medical and scientific community and are available in the Library.

The Government are already advised by the independent spongiform encephalopathy advisory committee, chaired by Dr. David Tyrrell FRS, which considers issues relating to spongiform

encephalopathies--including CJD and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. In the circumstances that every case of the very rare disease, CJD, is being fully monitored, that the medical and scientific community is alert to the need to learn more about the causes of CJD, and that the Government have in place an expert committee to give advice, it is not easy to see what would be added by holding an inquiry. In response to recent media reports, the Chief Medical Officer stated :

"I am concerned about the recent spate of irresponsible scare stories in the press suggesting that people are at risk of contracting the fatal Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease from eating beef. These sensational and alarmist reports must inevitably frighten large numbers of ordinary people--and for no good reason.

The facts are clear. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is extremely rare--only one person in a million gets it--and those unfortunate people who do get it have contracted it for a variety of reasons. There is no evidence at all that eating infected meat is one of them.

Newspaper reports have been commenting on the sad case of one 16-year-old girl--yet no one knows what illness she is suffering from.

We do not ignore any suggestions about the causes of diseases of this seriousness, and the Government have invested considerable resources on the research issues in recent years looking at : the incidence of CJD ;

the causes of each individual case ;

any possible links with BSE.

On the basis of the work done so far, there is no evidence whatever that BSE causes CJD and, similarly, not the slightest evidence that eating beef or hamburgers causes CJD.

My position as the Government's Chief Medical Officer means that I must provide the best advice to the public, whatever the consequences. If there was any evidence that suggested a link, then I would regard it as my responsibility to bring it to public attention."

Mr. Blunkett : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions she has had with Ministers at the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food regarding the possibility of a link between BSE and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

Mr. Sackville : Ministers and officials in both departments are in regular contact on these and other matters of mutual interest.

NHS Hospitals (Private Medical Companies)

Mr. Milburn : To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance her Department has issued to NHS hospitals about leasing or selling part of their premises to house the facilities of private medical companies.

Mr. Sackville : None.

Mr. Milburn : To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS hospitals have leased or sold part of their premises to house the facilities of private medical companies by region.


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