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Average age and average sentence length of      

young offenders in Prison                       

Service establishments in England and Wales on  

30 June, 1989-1993                              

Dated       |Average Age|Average                

(30 June    |(Years)    |sentence               

each year)              |length                 

------------------------------------------------

1989        |19.4       |23.3                   

1990        |18.8       |22.9                   

1991        |19.1       |22.5                   

<2>1992     |19.0       |25.2                   

<2>1993     |18.9       |25.6                   

<1> Excludes those sentenced to life and those  

for whom a sentence length is not recorded.     

<2> Provisional figures.                        

Mr. Etherington : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list for each year since 1989, the total number of young people serving youth custody sentences, who had been reclassified from young offender to adult before reaching 21 years of age and subsequently has the reclassification cancelled before the end of their sentence.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.


Column 453

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Bill Etherington, dated 10 February 1994 :

RECLASSIFICATION OF YOUNG OFFENDERS

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking if he will list for each year since 1989 the total number of young people serving youth custody sentences, who had been reclassified from young offender to adult before reaching 21 years of age and subsequently has the reclassification cancelled before the end of their sentence.

The information you have requested is not recorded.

Child Custody

Mrs. Golding : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average length of time a child spends in custody, broken down by offence.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from A. J. Pearson to Mrs. Llin Golding, dated 10 February 1994 :

AVERAGE SENTENCE LENGTH OF 15-17 YEAR OLDS

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking what is the average length of time a child spends in custody, broken down by offence.

The information you have requested is given in the attached table for persons aged 15 to 17 on sentence who were discharged from Prison Service establishments in 1991.


Average time served in Prison Service establishments in     

England and                                                 

Wales under sentence<1> by prisoners aged 15 to 17 at       

sentence                                                    

discharged from determinate sentences on completion of      

sentence by                                                 

offence, 1991                                               

                            |Average                        

                            |time served                    

                            |under                          

                            |sentence                       

Offence                     |(months)<2> <3>                

------------------------------------------------------------

Violence against the person |6.6                            

Sexual offences             |15.6                           

Burglary                    |4.3                            

Robbery                     |10.1                           

Theft and handling          |3.0                            

Fraud and forgery           |n/a<4>                         

Drugs offences              |n/a<4>                         

Other offences              |4.3                            

Offence not recorded        |3.3                            

                            |---                            

  All offences              |4.7                            

<1> Excludes any time served on remand awaiting trial or    

sentence, those detained for an indeterminate period at Her 

Majesty's pleasure, and those for whom a sentence length is 

not recorded.                                               

<2> Provisional figures.                                    

<3> Excludes discharges following recall after release on   

licence, non-criminals, persons committed to custody for    

non-payment of a fine, persons reclassified as adult        

prisoners, prisoners who died or were discharged for other  

reasons such as transfers to other establishments or        

successful appeals.                                         

<4> Number of discharges less than 15 in 1991.              

Mrs. Golding : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many children are currently being held in youth custody, broken down by offence.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the director general of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.


Column 454

Letter from A. J. Pearson to Mrs. Llin Golding, dated 10 February 1994 :

15-17 year olds in custody

The Home Secretary has asked me, in the absence of the Director General from the office, to reply to your recent Question asking how many children are currently being held in youth custody, broken down by offence.

The information you have requested is given in the attached table for persons aged 15 to 17 in Prison Service establishments on 31 December 1993.


Population aged 15-17 under sentence<1> in Prison 

Service establishments                            

in England and Wales on 31 December 1993.         

Offence                     |Number of            

                            |persons<2>           

--------------------------------------------------

Violence against the person |89                   

Sexual offences             |16                   

Burglary                    |287                  

Robbery                     |142                  

Theft and handling          |158                  

Fraud and forgery           |-                    

Other offences              |104                  

Offence not recorded        |51                   

                                                  

All Offences                |847                  

<1> Provisional figures.                          

<2> Excludes those committed for non payment of a 

fine.                                             

OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT

Population Control, China

Mr. McMaster : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he next plans to meet representatives of the Chinese Government to discuss the draft law on the use of mass abortion and sterilisation to prevent the birth of disabled babies ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Her Majesty's Government believe that discussion with the Chinese authorities on the details of their draft "natal and health care law" can be conducted most effectively by United Nations bodies, including the United Nations Fund for Population Activities.

Ecuador

Mr. Tom Clarke : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list each project funded by the Overseas Development Administration in Ecuador over the last five years.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : The list of projects and the value of the ODA contribution to them are as follows :


                                                     |£                  

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

1.  Cocoa Research                                   |239,000            

2.  Awa Forest Management                            |447,000            

3.  Zamora Agro-Forestry                             |225,000            

4.  Fisheries Management                             |1,550,000          

5.  Fisheries Management (Institutional Link)        |486,000            

6.  Geological Survey                                |1,300,000          

7.  Road Transport, Training and Research            |485,000            

8.  Computer-aided Engineering design and management |235,000            

9.  English Language Curriculum Reform               |438,000            

10. Advice to Ecuador Government on privatisation    |45,000             


Column 455

Poorest 20 Countries

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which are the poorest 20 countries in the world ; and what has happened to their bilateral aid allocations since 1979.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : The United Kingdom's gross bilateral aid to the 20 countries with the lowest gross national product per capita in 1992, on the basis of figures just issued by the World bank, are given. This list excludes countries for which incomes data are not available. The United Kingdom's gross bilateral aid to each of these countries in 1979 and in 1992-93 includes financial and technical assistance, food aid and disaster relief, debt relief and loans and equity investment by the Commonwealth Development Corporation.


£000's                                

              |1979   |1992-93        

--------------------------------------

Mozambique    |6,369  |34,141         

Ethiopia      |2,877  |18,022         

Tanzania      |23,559 |62,370         

Uganda        |2,212  |34,521         

Sierra Leone  |1,829  |6,382          

Nepal         |11,054 |13,841         

Bhutan        |24     |680            

Cambodia      |703    |2,066          

Guinea-Bissau |173    |9              

Burundi       |17     |205            

Malawi        |23,314 |26,823         

Bangladesh    |33,687 |65,717         

Chad          |45     |291            

Madagascar    |100    |936            

Rwanda        |2      |312            

Laos          |29     |94             

Zambia        |29,159 |47,974         

Burkina Faso  |24     |345            

Mali          |489    |1,223          

Niger         |912    |373            

Thailand (Biwater Group)

Mr. Tom Clarke : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list the water projects funded by the Overseas Development Administration in Thailand for which the Biwater Group has won the contract.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : The Overseas Development Administration has not funded any water projects in Thailand for which the Biwater Group has won the contract.

Tied Aid

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will publish a list, by project, of the major contractors who have benefited from tied aid on Overseas Development Administration projects over £5 million in value.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Details of projects supported under the aid and trade provision since its inception in 1977 are available in the Library of the House. As regards projects funded by the bilateral country programmes, the information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.


Column 456

Indonesia

Mr. Tom Clarke : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what projects and programmes constitute the police management training project funded by the Overseas Development Administration in Indonesia ; and what steps are taken to ensure that such projects and programmes do not support the operation of the Indonesian police in East Timor.

Mr Lennox-Boyd : The Indonesian national police project is concerned with the provision of public service management advice and training within the INP and with the development of a more community-based approach to policing. The United Kingdom has not recognised the annexation of East Timor by Indonesia, and we do not therefore fund Government-to-Government aid projects in East Timor. However, some Indonesian public officials trained under our aid programme may subsequently serve in East Timor. It is our hope that the assistance we provide will influence all those receiving it and help develop respect for human rights in Indonesia and East Timor.

Bilateral Aid

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what percentage of British bilateral aid is tied to the purchase of British goods ; and how this percentage has changed in each year since 1979.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : In 1992, 66.7 per cent. of our commitments of bilateral overseas development assistance were tied. Comparable figures since 1979 were as follows :


          |Per cent.          

------------------------------

1979      |84.5               

1980      |73.2               

1981      |79.5               

1982      |78.0               

1983      |74.4               

1984      |74.3               

1985      |73.5               

1986      |77.9               

1987      |76.4               

1988      |82.5               

1989      |76.0               

1990      |<1>n/a             

1991      |73.5               

<1>The tying status of United 

Kingdom official development  

assistance was not reported   

to the Development Assistance 

Committee for 1990.           

Kenya

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the level of food aid the ODA proposes to allocate to Kenya for 1994-95.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : We allocated 5,000 tonnes of white maize from our 1993-94 national food aid programme as an immediate response to the findings of the Food and Agriculture Organisation--World Food Programme mission last October. We will consider a further allocation from our 1994- 95 programme in the light of the forthcoming SEPHA appeal, and the plans of other donors including the EC.


Column 457

Malaysia

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what explicit commitments were given by the previous Prime Minister, which required him to give consent to the Pergau dam project in Malaysia.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : My right hon. and noble Friend the former Prime Minister informed the Malaysian Prime Minister at a meeting on 15 March 1989 that Her Majesty's Government had taken the decision to make aid and trade provision support available for the offshore element of the Pergau project.

Mr. Burden : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what changes there have been to the contract value of Biwater's Malaysian rural water supply scheme contracts ; and what implications these changes have had for Overseas Development Administration support for the projects involved.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd [holding answer 8 February 1994] : The original 1986 contract between the Malaysia Public Works Department and Biwater was for £425 million. This included an offshore element of £194 million in respect of which the Overseas Development Administration provided an aid and trade provision grant of £59.4 million. In 1991 the Malaysian client and Biwater negotiated an extension to the contract. This did not affect the level of support already agreed by the Overseas Development Administration.

Mr. Burden : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what was the tendering process involved in the Malaysian water supply project undertaken by Biwater which has received Overseas Development Administration assistance.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd [holding answer 8 February 1994] : The Malaysian client negotiated a contract directly with Biwater.

Mr. Burden : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representation the Overseas Development Administration has received regarding links between Biwater Group and the Malaysian royal family.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd [holding answer 8 February 1994] : None.

Population Programmes

Mr. Watson : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs which are the priority countries for bilateral population assistance within the United Kingdom overseas aid budget.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda are currently designated as priority countries for bilateral population assistance within the United Kingdom overseas aid budget.

Mr. Watson : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what are Her Majesty's Government's guiding principles in respect of population activities in developing countries.


Column 458

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : As explained in the ODA booklet "Children By Choice, Not Chance", our guiding principles in respect of population activities in developing countries are :

All men and women should be able to chose when to have children. Women in particular, should be in a position to exercise this choice of their own free will, without pressure or coercion.

If women are enabled to exercise this choice, fertility levels and birth rates in most countries can be expected to fall. Countries whose Governments establish a climate within which couples can exercise reproductive choice should eventually attain population growth rates that are in balance with their economic and natural resources.

All men and women need information, advice and services to enable them to choose when to have children.

Aid for population activities will be provided in accordance with each developing country Government's national strategies. Donor agencies should work together and co-ordinate their aid for population activities. They should, where appropriate, reinforce the leading role of international agencies such as the United Nations Fund for Population Activities, the World bank and the International Planned Parenthood Federation.

Land Mines

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on each of the activities funded by his Department relating to the clearance of land mines in Mozambique ; which of these activities are being carried out on (a) a bilateral or (b) a multilateral basis ; and whether any further aid will be given for medical attention of casualties of land mines.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Under our bilateral humanitarian assistance programme for Mozambique we are providing a grant of £710,000 to the Halo Trust to train, equip and supervise three local de-mining teams in Zambezia province. This programme is closely co-ordinated with British non- governmental organisations active in the province. De-mining in Mozambique is co-ordinated by the United Nations. It has commissioned the Halo Trust to undertake a comprehensive mines survey. The United Nations and EC are both funding de-mining programmes to which we are contributing multilaterally.

Our assistance to de-mining is designed to reduce the number of casualties. We have not provided any direct medical assistance for land mine casualties. Other agencies are working with the victims of mines.

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the policy of the Overseas Development Administration on providing aid to clear land mines in Angola.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Once a formal ceasefire has been established between the Government of Angola and UNITA and implementation of a permanent peace settlement started, we will consider assistance for demining. We expect this to be part of a United Nations co-ordinated effort.

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Monklands, West (Mr. Clarke) of 1 December, Official Report , column 572 , if he will make a statement on each of the activities funded by his Department relating to the clearance of land mines in Cambodia ; which of these activities are being carried out


Column 459

on (a) a bilateral or (b) a multilateral basis ; and whether any further aid will be given for medical attention of casulaties of land mines.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Since October 1991 our bilateral aid has included three grants to the Halo Trust, a British voluntary agency, for its mine clearance operations. These were for £60,000, £199,886 and £232, 520. We have also provided £6,415 for a mine awareness radio programme. Two further project proposals from the Halo Trust at a proposed cost of £330,000 are under consideration.

Until the end of October 1993, our multilateral support consisted of the United Kingdom contribution to the costs of the United Nations Transitional Authority for Cambodia--UNTAC--which financed mine clearance operations undertaken by the Cambodian mine action centre--CMAC. Since the end of UNTAC's mandate, we have provided £133, 000 through the United Nations Development Programme--UNDP--to support the continuance of CMAC's operations. A UNDP proposal for support to CMAC for two years is under consideration by donors. Our aid is aimed at reducing casualties caused by mines.

Additionally, we have provided £470,140 over the past three years to set up and run a limb-fitting unit at Calmette hospital in Phnom Penh. The project includes the training of Cambodian technicians in limb-fitting techniques. We have also begun funding a similar project in Kompong Som in southern Cambodia and have agreed funding of £249, 741 for this over three financial years.

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on each of the activities funded by his Department relating to the clearance of land mines in Somalia ; which of these activities are being carried out on (a) a bilateral or (b) a multilateral basis ; and whether any further aid will be given for medical attention of casualties of land mines.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : From November 1991 until May 1993 we co-funded, bilaterally, the training and supervision of over 220 members of the local "humanitarian mine clearance pioneer corps" in a major mine clearance programme in and around Hargeisa in the heavily mined north-west of the country. Over this period we contributed £673,540 to the work undertaken by the British company Rimfire International. Our aid has been aimed at reducing casualties caused by mines. The work is continuing as a programme of the United Nations operations in Somalia.

We have not received any proposals to provide medical assistance specifically for casualties of land mines, but remain willing to help in this area if requested.

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on each of the activities funded by his Department relating to the clearance of land mines in Afghanistan ; which of these activities are being carried out on (a) a bilateral or (b) a multilateral basis ; and whether any further aid will be given for medical attention of casualties of land mines.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : Since April 1992 we have funded, bilaterally, the training and supervision of two teams of Afghan mine clearers. The programme operates in the Shomali valley with the aim of facilitating the safe return of refugees and displaced people to the area. We have so


Column 460

far contributed £479,531 for this work undertaken by the British non-governmental organisation the Halo Trust. Our aid has been aimed at reducing casualties caused by mines.

The mine clearance programme in Afghanistan is co-ordinated by the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan--UNOCHA. Britain is one of the main contributors to the programme. In 1992 we provided £500,000 to UNOCHA for this purpose, and a further £1 million in 1993.

The European Community also finances mine clearance by contributing to European and local non-governmental organisations including those operating under the UNOCHA programme in and around Herat. Part of the funding for this is attributable to the United Kingdom.

We are currently considering proposals which could provide medical assistance specifically for casualties of land mines, but the current insecurity in the country precludes an early start to any such operations.

Development Assistance

Mr. Tom Clarke : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what was the annual official development assistance through aid and trade provision for each calendar year from its inception to the latest year for which data are available.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : The data requested are available only by financial year and are as follows :


          |£ million          

------------------------------

1979-80   |29                 

1980-81   |26                 

1981-82   |53                 

1982-83   |47                 

1983-84   |28                 

1984-85   |59                 

1985-86   |36                 

1986-87   |81                 

1987-88   |49                 

1988-89   |58                 

1989-90   |62                 

1990-91   |94                 

1991-92   |101                

1992-93   |93                 

Somalia

Mr. Parry : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the latest developments in the war in Somalia.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd [holding answer 8 February 1994] : In recent months inter-clan tensions and outbreaks of fighting have increased in central and southern Somalia. Reports indicate that some clans are re- arming. The international community has continued to urge the Somalis to take forward the political reconciliation process and have been encouraged by recent local agreements.

TRANSPORT

Traffic Director, London

Mr. Kilfoyle : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport who is the traffic director for London.

Mr. Norris : Mr. Derek Turner.


Column 461

Overseas Travel

Mr. Matthew Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what was the (a) budgeted and (b) actual expenditure by his Department on (1) internal and (2) overseas travel by the Secretary of State since 27 May 1993.

Mr. MacGregor : (a) The travel budget is not broken down between individual Ministers.

(b) Since 27 May 1993 the actual expenditure by my department on (1) My internal travel is £286.00

(2) My overseas travel is £5,512.62

These figures do not include the cost of my official car.

Mr. Matthew Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what was the (a) budgeted and (b) actual expenditure by his Department on (1) internal and (2) overseas travel by the Secretary of State in 1992-93 after 11 April 1992 and so far in 1993-94.

Mr. MacGregor : (a) The travel budget is not broken down between individual Ministers.

(b) Actual expenditure by my Department on my travel was (1) Internal-- £1,317.00 in 1992-93 after 11 April 1992 and £584.00 so far in 1993-94

(2) Overseas--£13,294.72 in 1992-93 after 11 April 1992 and £6, 078.62 so far in 1993-94

These figures do not include the cost of my official car.

London Buses

Mr. Raynsford : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many buses owned by London Buses Ltd have been (a) leased to and (b) sold to private companies operating services on behalf of London Transport since


Column 462

1985 ; how many in each case were (i) less than four years old, (ii) between four and seven years old (iii) between eight and 11 years old, (iv) between 12 and 15 years old, and (v) more than 15 years old ; and on which routes such leases or sales applied.

Mr. Norris : I understand that LBL has not sold any of its surplus buses to private companies operating LT bus routes. LBL has leased 46 Routemaster vehicles to London Transport's tendered bus division, which has in turn leased them to private operators to run routes 13 and 19. Both routes have been run under contract by private operators since 1993. The 46 Routemasters are more than 15 years old.

London Underground

Mr. Bayley : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many London Underground customers have received compensation due to delays in their service since January 1993 ; and how much compensation in total has been paid to those customers.

Mr. Norris : Since 1 January 1993 compensation totalling £180,357 has been paid in response to 59,251 individual claims. There is currently a large number of outstanding claims relating to incidents in the past two months of 1993, particularly the power failure on the Central line.

Mr. Bayley : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what quality of service targets were published by London Underground in May 1992 ; and how it has performed in relation to them.

Mr. Norris : The information requested is shown in the table.


Column 461


London Underground Limited: Quality of service targets and performance since May<1><2>                                                       

                                  Customer                                                                                                   

                                  satisfaction                                                                                               

                                  targets                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                                             

                                 |Cleanliness of   |Cleanliness of   |Staff helpfulness|Information on   |Information                        

                                 |trains           |stations         |and availability |trains           |on stations                        

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Targets set for 1992-93          |76               |85               |83               |78               |76                                 

4 weeks ending 23 May 1992       |75               |89               |83               |82               |75                                 

4 weeks ending 20 June 1992      |75               |88               |83               |83               |75                                 

4 weeks ending 18 July 1992      |73               |88               |84               |86               |78                                 

4 weeks ending 18 August 1992    |73               |88               |85               |86               |80                                 

4 weeks ending 12 September 1992 |74               |87               |87               |87               |82                                 

4 weeks ending 10 October 1992   |76               |88               |88               |86               |82                                 

4 weeks ending 7 November 1992   |76               |88               |88               |86               |79                                 

4 weeks ending 5 December 1992   |76               |88               |86               |85               |79                                 

4 weeks ending 2 January 1993    |77               |88               |86               |85               |79                                 

4 weeks ending 30 January 1993   |80               |89               |87               |87               |83                                 

4 weeks ending 27 February 1993  |81               |89               |87               |88               |83                                 

4 weeks ending 31 March 1993     |81               |89               |86               |88               |83                                 

Overall<3> for 1992-93           |85               |79               |76               |88               |85                                 


Column 461


                        Service                                                                                                                                

                        performance targets                                                                                                                    

                                                                                                                                                               

                       |Trains in       |Escalators in   |Lifts in        |<4>Train service|<5>Station      |<6>Ticket       |Other targets                    

                       |customer service|customer service|customer service|headways        |closures        |purchasing      |violent crime                    

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Targets set for                                                                                                                                                

1992-93                |97.5            |87.0            |85.0            |91.0            |50              |99.90           |To reduce                        

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

23 May 1992            |97.3            |90.2            |91.1            |95.4            |44              |99.97           |1.12                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

20 June 1992           |98.0            |90.6            |91.5            |95.9            |47              |99.95           |1.36                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

18 July 1992           |98.4            |90.0            |92.2            |95.9            |45              |99.94           |1.12                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

18 August 1992         |98.2            |89.5            |91.9            |96.5            |39              |99.87           |1.36                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

12 September 1992      |98.4            |88.3            |92.4            |95.9            |32              |99.95           |1.02                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

10 October 1992        |98.3            |89.1            |94.0            |96.6            |31              |99.92           |1.19                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

7 November 1992        |97.7            |89.6            |92.1            |95.0            |46              |99.92           |1.53                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

5 December 1992        |97.9            |90.0            |91.7            |95.0            |42              |99.95           |1.59                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

2 January 1993         |97.8            |88.5            |89.5            |94.4            |38              |99.93           |1.41                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

30 January 1993        |97.6            |88.3            |90.2            |95.0            |34              |99.93           |1.29                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

27 February 1993       |97.0            |87.3            |91.6            |93.5            |26              |99.89           |1.38                             

                                                                                                                                                               

4 weeks ending                                                                                                                                                 

31 March 1993          |97.2            |89.4            |90.9            |94.8            |56              |99.91           |1.12                             

                                                                                                                                                               

Overall<3> for 1992-93 |98.0            |89.0            |91.0            |95.2            |40              |99.93           |1.29                             


Column 463


Customer satisfaction targets                                                                                                             

                                 |Cleanliness   |Cleanliness   |Staff helpful-|Information   |Information   |Ticket                       

                                 |of trains     |of stations   |ness and      |on trains     |on stations   |purchasing<7>                

                                                               |availability                                                              

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Targets set for 1993-94<8>       |81            |89            |86            |86            |81            |92                           

4 weeks ending 24 April 1993     |82            |89            |85            |89            |81            |90                           

4 weeks ending 22 May 1993       |83            |89            |85            |90            |83            |89                           

4 weeks ending 19 June 1993      |84            |88            |86            |92            |82            |90                           

4 weeks ending 17 July 1993      |84            |89            |87            |93            |83            |91                           

4 weeks ending 14 August 1993    |84            |89            |87            |93            |82            |92                           

4 weeks ending 11 September 1993 |86            |90            |88            |94            |83            |93                           

4 weeks ending 9 October 1993    |87            |91            |90            |94            |83            |93                           

4 weeks ending 6 November 1993   |87            |91            |90            |95            |84            |93                           

4 weeks ending 4 December 1993   |86            |91            |89            |95            |84            |92                           

Overall to date 1993-94          |85            |89            |87            |93            |83            |91                           


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