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Mr. Brooke : Grants under section 17 and 24 of the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979 are made by English Heritage out of its grant in aid and were as follows :


,

£ thousands                                 

Year       |Section 17|Section 24           

--------------------------------------------

1986-87    |115       |795                  

1987-88    |84        |1,127                

1988-89    |107       |1,213                

1989-90    |105       |2,720                

1990-91    |131       |1,411                

1991-92    |112       |1,638                

1992-93    |105       |1,689                

Following the regionalisation of the Conservation Group in 1991, section 24 grants were no longer accounted for separately, but were included with grants made under section 3A of the Historic Buildings and Ancient Monuments Act 1953 for the repair or maintenance of buildings. The figures shown for section 24 grants for 1991-92 and 1992-93 therefore relate to offer levels rather than actual expenditure in those years and are the best available.

Public Appointments

Dr. Wright : To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will give details of the public appointments he is responsible for making in addition to those identified in "Public Bodies 1993", including non-executive agency and other departmental management boards.

Mr. Brooke : In addition to the bodies identified in "Public Bodies 1993", I am responsible for the following public appointments : The chairman of the South Bank board

The chairman and members of the Royal National Theatre board One member of the council of the Royal Albert hall


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Seven members of the Architectural Heritage Fund Council of Management

The chairman and members of the Treasure Trove Reviewing Committee The members of the Public Library Development Incentive Scheme Advisory Committee

The chairman of the sportsmatch sports sponsorship scheme The members of the Royal Parks advisory group

The members of the Historic Royal Palaces advisory group The Director General of the Office of the National Lottery

Register of Playing Fields

Ms Hoey : To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what public access there is to the register of playing fields in England and Wales ; what is the cost of each inquiry for members of the public ; and what is the total cost to public funds of the register of playing fields in England and Wales.

Mr. Brooke : Public access to the register of recreational land is widely available through local authorities. The cost of each inquiry depends on the extent of the inquiry but in most cases it is negligible.

The cost of the register to public funds has been £600,000, of which £500,000 was to compile the database and the remainder to update and maintain the database.

Box Office Receipts

Ms Mowlam : To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what percentage of total box office receipts in the United Kingdom were captured by films from (a) the United Kingdom, (b) the EC and (c) the USA in each of the last five years.

Mr. Brooke : I regret that detailed figures on box office receipts are not available from any central source.

HOME DEPARTMENT

Prison Service

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Director General of the Prison Service will be receiving a performance-related bonus for the year 1993-94 ; and what criteria will be used to determine the level of payment.

Mr. Hoyle : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what was the maximum performance bonus available to the chief executive of the Prison Service in 1993 ; and what will be the maximum bonus he can attain in 1994 ;

(2) what is the annual salary of the chief executive of the Prison Service for 1993, including details of performance bonuses ; (3) what is the criterion upon which a performance bonus can be paid to the chief executive of the Prison Service.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : The salary of the Director General of the Prison Service is £125,000 a year. In addition, he is eligible for a performance bonus of up to 35 per cent. of basic salary. For the period from his appointment on 6 January 1993 to 31 March 1993 the director general's performance was assessed solely on the basis of his personal contribution. For the period 1 April 1993 to 31 March 1994 his performance will be assessed partly on his personal contribution and partly on the achievement by


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the agency of its key targets, set out in the agency's business plan for 1993-94, a copy of which is in the Library. The details of the arrangements for assessing the performance of the director general are personal to him and I have no plans to publish them. His salary, including his performance bonus, will, however, be published in the agency's annual accounts, a copy of which will also be placed in the Library. The arrangements for determining his performance bonus for 1994-95 have not yet been finalised.

Escapees

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the number of escapes (a) from prison establishments and (b) from escorts expressed (i) in absolute numbers and (ii) as a percentage of the average prison population in each of the last three years and for 1993-94 to the latest available date.


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Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Ms Joan Ruddock, dated4 March 1994 : The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking for the number of escapes (a) from prison establishments and (b) from escorts expressed (i) in absolute numbers and (ii) as a percentage of the average prison population in each of the last three years and for 1993-94 to the latest available date.

The attached table lists the information you require for the financial years 1990-91, 1991-92, 1992-93 and April 1993-February 1994 (inclusive), as recorded by the Incident Management Support Unit.


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                                      |Average prison   |Escapes from     |Per cent.        |Escapes from     |Per cent.        |Totals           |Per cent.                          

                                      |population       |establishments<3>                  |escort                                                                                   

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1990-91                               |44,350           |225              |0.51             |111              |0.25             |336              |0.76                               

1991-92                               |45,162           |308              |0.68             |155              |0.34             |463              |1.03                               

1992-93                               |43,913           |237              |0.54             |152              |0.35             |389              |0.89                               

1993-94 (April to February inclusive) |45,606           |179              |<1>0.43          |<2>130           |<1>0.31          |<2>309           |<1>0.74                            

Notes:                                                                                                                                                                                

<1> The percentage figures for 1993-94 are annualised to provide a comparison with previous years.                                                                                    

<2> To provide a proper basis for comparison, 1993-94 figures exclude 34 escapes from magistrates' courts and escort to and from magistrates courts                                   

which are now the responsibility of the Prison Service in Humberside-East Midlands but which were the responsibility of the police in previous years.                                 

<3> The Prison Service's key performance indicator for escapes excludes prisoners immediately recaptured. Excluding immediate recaptures, there have                                  

been 259 escapes so far in 1993-94-0.62 per cent. annualised-compared to 347 escapes in 1992-93-0.79 per cent.                                                                        

Slopping Out

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress has been made on ending slopping out since the statement by the Home Secretary contained in "Custody, Care and Justice" in September 1991.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from A. J. Butler to Ms Joan Ruddock, dated 4 March 1994 : The Home Secretary has asked me, in the absence of the Director General from the Prison Service, to reply to your recent Question about the progress made with the Prison Service's programme of installing integral sanitation in prison establishments.

The number of prisoners with 24 hour access to sanitation has now risen to 90 per cent. compared with 60 per cent. in 1991. The target for the Prison Service for 1993-94 is to provide through the accelerated sanitation programme 24 hour access to sanitation in at least 4,700 existing prison places. In addition a further 2,400 newly constructed and renovated places are scheduled for completion this year, all of which will have integral sanitation.

As stated by the Home Secretary in his written reply to Sir Ivan Lawrence on 2 February 1994 the December 1994 target for ending slopping out cannot now be met since this would lead to unacceptable levels of overcrowding. By the end of 1994, however, more than 95 per cent. of prisoners will have access to sanitation at all times. The Prison Service continues to give very high priority to completing the sanitation programme as soon as possible, within


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the constraints imposed by the prison population and we aim to complete the programme no later than February 1996, the date recommended by Lord Woolf in his report.

Prisons

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the current average cost per prisoner place ; and what was the average cost per prisoner place in each of the last three years.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Ms Joan Ruddock, dated 4 March 1994 : The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the current average cost per prisoner place and the average cost in each of the last three years.

The available information on current expenditure per baseline certified normal accommodation place, which is now a key performance indicator for the Prison Service, is as follows :


Year       |£            

-------------------------

<1>1993-94 |23,164       

1992-93    |22,722       

<1> Provisional.         

Figures for the two      

previous years are not   

available in this form.  

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of prisoners are held in establishments where prisoners are unlocked for a total of at least 12 hours each weekday at the latest available date ; and what steps are being taken to increase this number.


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Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Ms Joan Ruddock, dated 4 March 1994 : The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking what percentage of prisoners are held in establishments where prisoners are unlocked for a total of at least 12 hours each weekday at the latest available date ; and what steps are being taken to increase this number.

On 31 January 1994, 27.1 per cent. of prisoners were held in establishments where prisoners are unlocked for at least 12 hours on weekdays. Increased time unlocked, together with increased constructive activity for prisoners, remains a key target for the Prison Service. Many establishments are working on new shift systems with a view to increasing time unlocked and to introducing 12 hour unlocking on weekdays.

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners were being held three to a cell in accommodation intended for one prisoner on the last day of each month from April 1992 to January 1994.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from A. J. Butler to Ms Joan Ruddock, dated 4 March 1994 : The Home Secretary has asked me, in the absence of the Director General from the office, to reply to your recent Question about cell sharing.

The attached table shows how many prisoners shared three to a cell intended for one prisoner at the end of the months listed. As this information was collected on a quarterly basis between September 1992 and April 1993, it is not possible to give figures for every month in the period detailed in your Question.


Month           |Number sharing                 

                |three to a cell                

------------------------------------------------

April 1992      |1,038                          

May 1992        |1,005                          

June 1992       |789                            

July 1992       |720                            

August 1992     |543                            

September 1992  |498                            

December 1992   |210                            

March 1993      |108                            

April 1993      |114                            

May 1993        |126                            

June 1993       |132                            

July 1993       |123                            

August 1993     |114                            

September 1993  |93                             

October 1993    |42                             

November 1993   |84                             

December 1993   |57                             

January 1994    |39                             

Police Cells

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners were held in police cells during each month from January 1993 to January 1994 and during February 1994 to the latest available date.


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Mr. Charles Wardle : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from A. J. Butler to Ms Joan Ruddock. dated 4 March 1994 :

The Home Secretary has asked me, in the absence of the Director General from the office, to reply to your recent Question about how many prisoners were held in police cells during each month from January 1993 to January 1994 and during February 1994 to the latest available date.

It is not possible to give a breakdown by number of those prisoners held in police custody, as some may be retained in police custody for more than one night. However, the number of prisoner nights being charged to the Prison Service are as follows :


                |Number of                      

                |prisoner nights                

------------------------------------------------

1993                                            

January         |7,451                          

February        |1,048                          

March           |nil                            

April           |nil                            

May             |nil                            

June            |nil                            

July            |nil                            

August          |nil                            

September       |nil                            

October         |nil                            

November        |134                            

December        |307                            

                                                

1994                                            

January         |20                             

February (up to 26 February) 4,190              

Prison Searches

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) who was consulted prior to the announcement by the Prison Service that authorised employees would be given powers to search in Her Majesty's prisons ;

(2) who he envisages will be the designated authorised employees who shall have the power to search prisoners for unauthorised property ;

(3) what training authorised employees will receive to assist them with the search of prisoners for unauthorised property ;

(4) what working definition he will use of reasonable force in pursuance of powers of search of prisoners by authorised employees for unathorised property.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Because of the need to take the opportunity offered by the Criminal Justice and Public Order Bill to legislate, there was not time for formal consultation before the measure was announced. If the legislation is enacted, we shall be drawing up guidance to governors on how to implement the power. We shall consult the trade unions representing the staff concerned before issuing the guidance.

The guidance will cover which categories of staff may be authorised to search. At present it is envisaged that the employees concerned will be civilian staff involved in the custody or supervision of prisoners, e.g. instructors in workshops, caterers in charge of kitchen parties, night patrol staff and night custody officers. They will not be staff whose duties do not involve direct contact with


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prisoners. Governors will be able to choose which categories of staff within the guidelines should be authorised to conduct searches in the particular circumstances of their establishment.

The guidance will also advise governors tro arrange local training for any staff who will be exercising the power. The kind of search involved is a simple "rub down" search, similar to the kind frequently conducted on passengers passing through airport security, so it is a fairly straightforward procedure.

The proposed power of search is backed by the power to use reasonable force if necessary. As as present envisaged, the guidance will make it clear that prison officers shoudl be called in if any prisoner offers resistance to being searched. Civilian staff will not be asked forcible to search prisoners.

Prisons (Drugs)

Ms Ruddock : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if the proposed drugs testing of suspected drug users in prison will be compulsory ; and if participation will be linked to the granting of privileges ;

(2) who will carry out the proposed drugs testing on prisoners ; (3) in what circumstances a drugs test will be authorised on a prisoner ; and who will be able to authorise such a test ; (4) if the proposed drugs tests on prisoners will use urine or blood samples or both ;

(5) if the results of any drugs tests carried out on prisoners will be subject to medical confidentiality ;

(6) if any positive result of a drugs test on a prisoner will be used in subsequent disciplinary proceedings.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Testing prisoners for durgs is a key element in our plans to control drug misuse in prisons.

The proposals for drug testing in prisons brought forward in the Criminal Justice and Public Order Bill will give prison officers powers to require prisoners to untake drug tests. This will be backed up by new prison rules making the use of drugs in prison and refusal to undertake a test a disciplinary offence. Prisoners may not be compelled to undertake a test but as has been explained refusal will be a disciplinary offence.

We expect drug testing to be used in a number of different circumstatnces, for example :

where there is "reasonable suspicion" prisoners have misused drugs :

on a random basis as a deterrent to drug misuse ;

as part of compacts with prisoners, relating, for example, to entry into drug rehabilitation units or seek privileges such as home leave. There are no plans to link participation in tests more generally to the granting of privileges, but this will be considered as detailed plans are developed.

Our current expectation is that tests will use urine samples but as technology improves we may be able to use hair samples. The proposals before Parliament specifically exclude the use of blood and other intimate samples.

Prison officers will oversee the provision of urine specimens by prisoners. We are currently considering the most appropriate arrangements for analysing the specimens and will be providing detailed guidance on this for prison governors.

Prison governors will authorise the use of drug testing in their establishments and again the Prison Service will provide detailed guidance on when testing would be


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appropriate and how it should be conducted. We have already explained the main circumstances in which we expect drug testing to be used.

A positive drug test which results from a specimen provided to a prison officer under these proposals could be used as evidence under the Prison Service disciplinary arrangements. As such it would not be subject to medical confidentiality.

Public Interest Immunity Certificates

Mr. Meacher : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his answer of 18 February, Official Report, column 1028, if he will provide whatever information is available of those occasions on which he, or other Ministers in his Department, have signed public interest immunity certificates, and for what reasons.

Mr. Howard : Since I became Home Secretary, I have signed four public interest immunity certificates. In two certificates, signed in July and September 1993, I made a claim for protection of certain documentary and oral evidence from disclosure on grounds of national security relating to the work of the Security Service, in a criminal prosecution involving explosives and firearms charges and in civil proceeding in the High Court respectively. In the third certificate, signed in November 1993, I made a claim for protection from disclosure of an internal inquiry report into a prison riot and related documents, in connection with criminal proceedings arising out of the riot. In the fourth certificate, also signed in November 1993, a claim was made in connection with judicial review proceedings brought by a prisoner and related to the disclosure of documents considered by the category A committee when assessing what security conditions should apply to certain prisoners. No other Home Office Minister has signed any public interest immunity certificate during this time.

Whitemoor Prison

Mr. Maclennan : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many appointments made by legal representatives of prisoners at Her Majesty's prison Whitemoor have been incorrectly scheduled by the prison officials since 20 December 1992 ; (2) how long legal representatives have to wait, on average, to see their clients in Her Majesty's prison Whitemoor when appointments have been previously made.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Robert Maclennan, dated 4 March 1994 :

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your two recent Questions about visits at Whitemoor Prison by their legal representatives.

There is no record of any incorrectly scheduled appointments at Whitemoor since 20 December 1992. The average time taken to bring a prisoner to meet his legal representative is about ten minutes, but if the prisoner has chosen to go to work or classes instead of waiting in his cell, it will take longer to bring him to the visiting area.

If you have any specific details about cases of incorrectly scheduled appointments, I would be happy to arrange to have these investigated further.


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Prisoners (Legal Access)

Mr. Maclennan : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what targets he has set the Prison Service to ensure efficient and convenient access to prisoners by their legal representatives : and to what degree these targets are met.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : Responsibilty for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Robert Maclennan, dated 4 March 1994 :

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about Prison Service targets designed to ensure efficient and convenient access by prisoners to their legal representatives. There is at present no set target for the Prison Service in relation to legal visits. Demand for such visits varies significantly from place to place and over time. Rule 37 of the Prison Rules, a copy of which is in the Library, requires that legal advisers shall be allowed reasonable facilities for interviewing prisoners, and may do so out of the hearing but in the sight of prison staff. Governors are aware that it is important to allow advisers swift and prompt access and most prisons operate an appointment booking system specifically for legal visits.

Statistical information on legal visits is not held centrally but a review of practice at a number of prisons completed in May 1993 showed that in general legal advisers were able to visit their clients within two or three working days of a request being made. However, at times of increased demand, longer waiting periods may be unavoidable because of competing pressures on visiting facilities.

Electoral Law

Mr. Jenkin : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will announce the conclusions of the working groups set up to review electoral law and practice.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : After the last general election, the Home Office asked all the political parties and the representative groups of the local authorities for proposals to improve any aspects of the electoral system they felt were capable of improvement. Following receipt of their comments and meetings at the Home Office, five working groups were established, consisting of Home Office officials and a small number of experienced electoral administrators, with the remit of considering changes in the system, in the light of comments which had been received.

The reports of four of the working groups have today been placed in the Library, and are being issued to the political parties and local authority associations for comment. These reports cover absent voting, automated vote counting--also including consideration of access for disabled people to the electoral process--electoral registration and forms. The report of the fifth working group, on returning officer's fees and expenses, has not yet been finalised.

Officials will meet the political parties in March to discuss the reports, and the local authority associations in June, following the completion of the local and European parliamentary elections. Following this, Ministers will consider options for change.


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EC Budget (Fraud)

Sir Ivan Lawrence : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proposals the Government has to tackle the problem of fraud committed against the European Community budget.

Mr. Howard : The Government attach the highest importance to ensuring that effective action is taken to protect toe financial interests in the Community. To this end, I have written to the president of the Justice and Home Affairs Council proposing the major new initiative to combat fraud against the budget, involving a legally-binding joint action by the member states of the European Union under title VI of the Maastricht treaty.

The proposal, which is designed to achieve concerted action by the Twelve to protect the Community's financial interests through member state's criminal laws, will shortly be presented for discussion at a meeting of the relevant EU judicial co-operation working group. I will arrange for copy of the joint action proposal to be made available to the Select Committee on Home Affairs and the the Scrutiny Committees of both Houses with an explanatory memorandum.

Murder (Parole)

Mr. Dixon : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on how many occasions since 1985 the Parole Board has recommended release on licence of a person serving a life sentence for murder who has neither admitted responsibility for the offfence nor shown contrition for the alleged offence.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : The information requested is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Ethnic Minority Funding

Mr. Cox : To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the schools in the London borough of Wandsworth that receive funding under section 11.

Mr. Peter Lloyd : We understand that posts funded under section 11 are currently allocated to the following schools in the London borough of Wandsworth:

Primary

Albermarle

Alderbrook

Balham Nursery

Belleville

Bolingbroke

Broadwater

Chesterton

Christchurch CE

Danebury

Eardley

Earlsfield

Falconbrook

Fircroft

Franciscan

Furzedown

Granard

High View

Hillbrook

Honeywell Infants

Hotham

John Burns

John Milton

Joseph Tritton


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