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Sir John Wheeler : The following amounts were received from the European social fund :


Financial  |Total              

Year       |£ million          

-------------------------------

1973-74    |-                  

1974-75    |3.4                

1975-76    |0.0                

1976-77    |6.4                

1977-78    |7.5                

1978-79    |15.0               

1979-80    |15.0               

1980-81    |23.0               

1981-82    |25.0               

1982-83    |35.2               

1983-84    |38.0               

1984-85    |38.0               

1985-86    |25.0               

1986-87    |53.3               

1987-88    |56.4               

1988-89    |36.1               

1989-90    |44.6               

1990-91    |43.7               

<1>1991-92 |42.2               

           |-------            

Total      |507.8              

<1>This is the latest          

available information as       

claims for 1993, and some for  

1992, have not yet been        

settled.                       

Receipts earned by the private sector and by non-central Government public sector bodies are paid to the claimant. The recipients represent cash additions to the recipients. Receipts earned by central Government are paid into the Northern Ireland Consolidated Fund. All ESF receipts are subject to EC audit arrangements. The overall level of receipts is taken into account in the Government's decisions on public expenditure allocations, and their availability enables public expenditure to be maintained at a higher level than would otherwise be feasible.

Rev. Ian Paisley : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how much Northern Ireland's share of the United Kingdom's payments into the European Economic Community was from 1 January 1973 to 31 December 1993 ; how much Northern Ireland's share was of the receipts for the same period ; and how much of those receipts was used to offset Government expenditure on Northern Ireland.

Sir John Wheeler : It is not possible to determine Northern Ireland's actual share of the United Kingdom's contribution to the European Community because payments are made on a national and not a regional basis. Similarly it is not possible to identify the full extent of receipts from the Community. However, a Northern Ireland attributed share of the contribution to the EC is calculated as an accounting mechanism necessary because of the operation of a separate Northern Ireland Consolidated Fund. This notional attributed share does not count as an item of expenditure within the Northern Ireland public expenditure programme and has therefore no bearing on the level of public expenditure in the Province.

Figures for the notional attribution of part of Northern Ireland's share of the United Kingdom's payments and for those areas where the receipts from the European Community's structural funds can be separately identified are as follows :


Financialyear |Attributed   |Identified                 

              |share (part) |receipts<2>                

              |£ million    |£ million                  

--------------------------------------------------------

1973-74       |1            |0                          

1974-75       |6            |4                          

1975-76       |8            |4                          

1976-77       |13           |16                         

1977-78       |16           |14                         

1978-79       |24           |19                         

1979-80       |28           |31                         

1980-81       |28           |44                         

1981-82       |50           |41                         

1982-83       |66           |53                         

1983-84       |66           |51                         

1984-85       |68           |58                         

1985-86       |74           |44                         

1986-87       |62           |77                         

1987-88       |91           |111                        

1988-89       |85           |96                         

1989-90       |104          |95                         

1990-91       |107          |110                        

1991-92       |<1>100       |132                        

1992-93       |<1>134       |158                        

              |---          |---                        

Total         |1,131        |1,158                      

<1>Attributed share figures for the last two years are  

provisional estimates which will be revised when final  

details of tax revenues are determined.                 

<2>This comprises total identified EC structural funds  

receipts in Northern Ireland.                           

All receipts represent cash additions to the recipients and are subject to normal European Community audit arrangements.

The overall level of receipts is taken into account in the Government's decisions on public expenditure allocations and their availability enables public expenditure to be maintained at a higher level than would otherwise be feasible.

Prisoners (Christmas Leave)

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will list by (a) Her Majesty's prison and (b) Her Majesty's remand prison the number of prisoners who applied for Christmas leave and the number of those who were granted Christmas leave ; and if he will make a statement.

Sir John Wheeler : In December 1993 a total number of 446 convicted prisoners were released from the following prisons for Christmas home leave. Under the criteria for Christmas home leave, remand prisoners are not eligible to apply.


Prison                 |Applications|Applications             

                                    |granted                  

--------------------------------------------------------------

Belfast                |33          |32                       

Maze                   |116         |111                      

Maghaberry             |115         |109                      

Magilligan             |162         |145                      

Young Offenders Centre |79          |49                       

The Christmas home leave scheme and other release schemes play a key part in the Northern Ireland prison service's objectives by enabling prisoners to retain, and in some cases, re-establish family and community links in preparation for eventual release, and this has proved to be very successful. Of the 466 prisoners only two remain unlawfully at large. Both are medium-risk prisoners who had short periods left to serve.

Outdoor Education Centres

Mr. Jamieson : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will list the names, location and county of each of the outdoor education centres in Northern Ireland.

Mr. Ancram : The information is as follows :


Outdoor education centres                                                           

Name                    |Location           |County                                 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ballyholme              |Portrush           |Antrim                                 

Bushmills               |Bushmills          |Antrim                                 

Derganagh House         |Ballycastle        |Antrim                                 

Drumalla House          |Carnlough          |Antrim                                 

Ardnabannon             |Castlewellan       |Down                                   

Binnian                 |Newcastle          |Down                                   

Cabra Towers            |Newry              |Down                                   

Delamont                |Killyleagh         |Down                                   

F. H. Ebbit             |Newcastle          |Down                                   

Ganaway                 |Millisle           |Down                                   

Killowen                |Rostrevor          |Down                                   

Killyleagh              |Killyleagh         |Down                                   

Shannaghmore            |Newcastle          |Down                                   

Tullymore               |Newcastle          |Down                                   

Yellow Water Cottage    |Rostrevor          |Down                                   

Coranerk                |Derrygonnelly      |Fermanagh                              

Gortatole               |Florencecourt      |Fermanagh                              

Carrowmena              |Limavady           |Londonderry                            

Magilligan Field Centre |Limavady           |Londonderry                            

Woodhall                |Kilrea             |Londonderry                            

Carnteel                |Aughnacloy         |Tyrone                                 

Corrick                 |Newtownstewart     |Tyrone                                 

Goles Cottage           |Keadycam,Plumbridge|Tyrone                                 

Dentistry

Rev. Martin Smyth : To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what is the amount spent per child aged under 18 years on general dental services in the Province, whether or not registered with a general dental practitioner.

Mr. Ancram : I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer that I gave to the hon. Member for Rochdale (Ms Lynne) on 11 March 1994 at columns 436-37.

EDUCATION

Teachers (Trials)

Ms Walley : To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) head teachers and (b) teachers in (i) 1992-93 and (ii) 1993-94 were committed to trial and found guilty ; and what information he has concerning costs incurred.

Mr. Forth : This information is not collected in the form requested. The Department receives about 150 reports a year from the police or employers about the conviction of teachers and other staff. Records are not held by year of conviction or by category of staff. We have no information about the cost of bringing teachers to trial.

Science

Mr. Alan W. Williams : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will make a statement on the decision to withdraw combined science as a compulsory double subject at GCSE level in the national curriculum ; what is his Department's assessment of the effect this will have on (a) the number of 16-year-olds studying science, (b) their total exposure to science subjects during their education and (c) the longer-term scientific literacy of British society.

Mr. Robin Squire : There has been no such decision. Double award science never has been compulsory at GCSE level. Sir Ron Dearing's final report recommends that the minimum statutory requirement for science at key stage 4 14 to 16-year-olds--should continue to be the single award science. Most 14 to 16-year-old pupils--around 85 per cent. when last sampled in 1993--do, however, take double award science, and we welcome that.


Column 619

Mr. Alan W. Williams : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what initiatives his Department is taking to encourage more young people at school to study science and to choose science subjects in higher education.

Mr. Boswell : The national curriculum ensures that all pupils, from the age of five to 16, study science. Most pupils in their final year of compulsory schooling--about 85 per cent. when last sampled in 1993--take the double award in science. That ensures that they are qualified for further study. In addition to the traditional A-level route, new high- quality vocational qualifications post-16 will provide alternative routes for students to continue their science and technology studies. General national vocational qualifications in science started a pilot phase in September 1993.

Mr. Alan W. Williams : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish tables showing the percentage of teaching time devoted to (a) mathematics, (b) physics, (c) chemistry and (d) total for all science


Column 620

subjects for the average 14-year-old, 15- year-old and 16-year-old in (i) the United Kingdom, (ii) France, (iii) Germany, (iv) Italy, (v) Japan and (vi) the United States of America at the latest date for which figures are available.

Mr. Forth : The information requested is not available centrally.

Grant-maintained Schools

Mrs. Bridget Prentice : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what are the numbers and percentages of (a) schools and (b) children at (i) primary and (ii) secondary levels who are in grant-maintained establishments for each London borough, both inclusive and exclusive of those in the private sector.

Mr. Robin Squire : The tables show numbers and percentages of grant- maintained schools and pupils in such schools in the 33 London boroughs.


Schools and pupils in the London boroughs                                                                         

Table A: maintained primary schools                                                                               

                       |1           |2           |3           |4           |5           |6                        

LEA                    |Total number|Total number|Percentage  |Total number|Total number|Percentage               

                       |schools     |GM schools  |GMS in LEA  |pupils      |GM pupils   |GM pupils                

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Corporation of London  |1                        |0.0         |214         |0           |0.0                      

Camden                 |41                       |0.0         |10,610      |0           |0.0                      

Greenwich              |77                       |0.0         |20,934      |0           |0.0                      

Hackney                |69                       |0.0         |16,677      |0           |0.0                      

Hammersmith            |38                       |0.0         |9,025       |0           |0.0                      

Islington              |57                       |0.0         |14,966      |0           |0.0                      

Kensington and Chelsea |27          |1           |3.7         |6,292       |326         |5.2                      

Lambeth                |78          |5           |6.4         |19,053      |1,250       |6.6                      

Lewisham               |70          |1           |1.4         |20,479      |361         |1.8                      

Southwark              |76          |5           |6.6         |21,222      |1,265       |6.0                      

Tower Hamlets          |74                       |0.0         |20,717      |0           |0.0                      

Wandsworth             |65          |2           |3.1         |17,250      |515         |3.0                      

Westminster            |41                       |0.0         |9,122       |0           |0.0                      

Barking                |54                       |0.0         |15,727      |0           |0.0                      

Barnet                 |89          |2           |2.2         |23,790      |776         |3.3                      

Bexley                 |65          |2           |3.1         |18,596      |447         |2.4                      

Brent                  |65          |1           |1.5         |22,228      |493         |2.2                      

Bromley                |78          |2           |2.6         |20,449      |934         |4.6                      

Croydon                |98          |2           |2.0         |26,271      |836         |3.2                      

Ealing                 |91          |4           |4.4         |27,652      |1,217       |4.4                      

Enfield                |70          |1           |1.4         |23,316      |149         |0.6                      

Haringey               |77                       |0.0         |19,127      |0           |0.0                      

Harrow                 |54                       |0.0         |19,109      |0           |0.0                      

Havering               |74                       |0.0         |19,624      |0           |0.0                      

Hillingdon             |72          |11          |15.3        |20,107      |2,602       |12.9                     

Hounslow               |63                       |0.0         |19,339      |0           |0.0                      

Kingston upon Thames   |36          |1           |2.8         |10,463      |191         |1.8                      

Merton                 |49                       |0.0         |15,224      |0           |0.0                      

Newham                 |67                       |0.0         |25,235      |0           |0.0                      

Redbridge              |56                       |0.0         |19,045      |0           |0.0                      

Richmond upon Thames   |39                       |0.0         |10,785      |0           |0.0                      

Sutton                 |43          |3           |7.0         |12,884      |799         |6.2                      

Waltham Forest         |62                       |0.0         |19,705      |0           |0.0                      

                       |---         |---         |---         |---         |---         |---                      

Totals                 |2,016       |43          |2.1         |575,237     |12,161      |2.1                      


Table B: maintained secondary schools                                                                             

                       |1           |2           |3           |4           |5           |6                        

LEA                    |Total number|Total number|Percentage  |Total number|Total number|Percentage               

                       |schools     |GM schools  |GMS in LEA  |pupils      |GM pupils   |GM pupils                

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Corporation of London  |0           |0           |0.0         |0           |0           |0.0                      

Camden                 |11          |2           |18.2        |10,479      |2,340       |22.3                     

Greenwich              |15          |0           |0.0         |13,956      |0           |0.0                      

Hackney                |10          |0           |0.0         |7,384       |0           |0.0                      

Hammersmith            |9           |1           |11.1        |5,976       |1,229       |20.6                     

Islington              |9           |0           |0.0         |7,037       |0           |0.0                      

Kensington and Chelsea |4           |1           |25.0        |3,203       |629         |19.6                     

Lambeth                |10          |5           |50.0        |6,350       |3,363       |53.0                     

Lewisham               |13          |0           |0.0         |10,515      |0           |0.0                      

Southwark              |14          |5           |35.7        |9,121       |2,765       |30.3                     

Tower Hamlets          |15          |1           |6.7         |11,582      |907         |7.8                      

Wandsworth             |10          |6           |60.0        |8,907       |6,487       |72.8                     

Westminster            |8           |0           |0.0         |7,358       |0           |0.0                      

Barking                |8           |0           |0.0         |9,493       |0           |0.0                      

Barnet                 |21          |9           |42.9        |18,416      |8,946       |48.6                     

Bexley                 |16          |4           |25.0        |14,391      |2,818       |19.6                     

Brent                  |14          |8           |57.1        |12,387      |8,154       |65.8                     

Bromley                |17          |11          |64.7        |16,688      |10,581      |63.4                     

Croydon                |20          |4           |20.0        |14,561      |3,713       |25.5                     

Ealing                 |12          |5           |41.7        |10,998      |4,905       |44.6                     

Enfield                |17          |5           |29.4        |17,390      |5,576       |32.1                     

Haringey               |9           |0           |0.0         |9,060       |0           |0.0                      

Harrow                 |10          |1           |10.0        |7,965       |483         |6.1                      

Havering               |18          |4           |22.2        |14,825      |3,813       |25.7                     

Hillingdon             |17          |12          |70.6        |13,715      |11,467      |83.6                     

Hounslow               |14          |2           |14.3        |14,010      |2,108       |15.0                     

Kingston upon Thames   |10          |4           |40.0        |7,607       |2,859       |37.6                     

Merton                 |11          |0           |0.0         |7,167       |0           |0.0                      

Newham                 |14          |1           |7.1         |13,575      |556         |4.1                      

Redbridge              |14          |1           |7.1         |14,952      |1,113       |7.4                      

Richmond upon Thames   |8           |0           |0.0         |7,447       |0           |0.0                      

Sutton                 |14          |8           |57.1        |11,065      |6,591       |59.6                     

Waltham Forest         |16          |2           |12.5        |11,049      |1,915       |17.3                     

                       |---         |---         |---         |---         |---         |---                      

Totals                 |408         |102         |25.0        |348,629     |93,318      |26.8                     


Table C: All schools                                                                                              

                       |1           |2           |3           |4           |5           |6                        

LEA                    |Total number|Total number|Percentage  |Total number|Total number|Percentage               

                       |schools     |GM schools  |GMS in LEA  |pupils      |GM pupils   |GM pupils                

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Corporation of London  |4           |0           |0.0         |1,795       |0           |0.0                      

Camden                 |90          |2           |2.2         |27,541      |2,340       |8.5                      

Greenwich              |112         |0           |0.0         |38,182      |0           |0.0                      

Hackney                |103         |0           |0.0         |28,246      |0           |0.0                      

Hammersmith            |71          |1           |1.4         |19,605      |1,229       |6.3                      

Islington              |78          |0           |0.0         |23,295      |0           |0.0                      

Kensington and Chelsea |78          |2           |2.6         |20,365      |955         |4.7                      

Lambeth                |115         |10          |8.7         |28,366      |4,613       |16.3                     

Lewisham               |100         |1           |1.0         |35,046      |361         |1.0                      

Southwark              |114         |10          |8.8         |36,788      |4,030       |11.0                     

Tower Hamlets          |107         |1           |0.9         |33,841      |907         |2.7                      

Wandsworth             |115         |8           |7.0         |32,304      |7,002       |21.7                     

Westminster            |81          |0           |0.0         |22,616      |0           |0.0                      

Barking                |65          |0           |0.0         |25,373      |0           |0.0                      

Barnet                 |146         |11          |7.5         |48,850      |9,722       |19.9                     

Bexley                 |90          |6           |6.7         |34,112      |3,265       |9.6                      

Brent                  |101         |9           |8.9         |37,168      |8,647       |23.3                     

Bromley                |120         |13          |10.8        |43,202      |11,515      |26.7                     

Croydon                |155         |6           |3.9         |50,660      |4,549       |9.0                      

Ealing                 |134         |9           |6.7         |45,378      |6,122       |13.5                     

Enfield                |99          |6           |6.1         |42,479      |5,725       |13.5                     

Haringey               |105         |0           |0.0         |31,106      |0           |0.0                      

Harrow                 |83          |1           |1.2         |31,983      |483         |1.5                      

Havering               |102         |4           |3.9         |35,353      |3,813       |10.8                     

Hillingdon             |106         |23          |21.7        |37,753      |14,069      |37.3                     

Hounslow               |88          |2           |2.3         |34,493      |2,108       |6.1                      

Kingston upon Thames   |64          |5           |7.8         |21,623      |3,050       |14.1                     

Merton                 |76          |0           |0.0         |25,980      |0           |0.0                      

Newham                 |98          |1           |1.0         |40,266      |556         |1.4                      

Redbridge              |89          |1           |1.1         |38,043      |1,113       |2.9                      

Richmond upon Thames   |71          |0           |0.0         |25,040      |0           |0.0                      

Sutton                 |71          |11          |15.5        |26,232      |7,390       |28.2                     

Waltham Forest         |91          |2           |2.2         |33,357      |1,915       |5.7                      

                       |---         |---         |---         |---         |---         |---                      

Totals                 |3,122       |145         |4.6         |1,056,441   |105,479     |10.0                     

Footnotes to the tables                                                                                           

1. The figures for total schools and pupils are estimates derived from the Department for Education's January     

1993 schools' census.                                                                                             

2. The figures for numbers of pupils are based on a headcount of full-time and part-time pupils.                  

3. The numbers of grant-maintained schools are the totals operating in January 1994.                              

4. Table A-maintained primary sector-and Table B-maintained secondary sector-exclude figures for special and      

independent schools. The data on these schools held by the Department cannot be divided into"primary" and         

"secondary".                                                                                                      

5. Table A and Table B include middle deemed primary and middle deemed secondary schools respectively.            

6. Table B excludes sixth form colleges as these institutions are now part of the further education sector.       

7. Table C includes maintained nursery, primary,secondary and special schools, and non-maintained special and     

independent schools.                                                                                              

Expelled Pupils

Mrs. Bridget Prentice : To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pupils have been expelled from secondary schools for (a) drug abuse and (b) violence in each of the London boroughs in each of the last 10 years.

Mr. Forth : Figures for each of the last 10 years are not available. Information on permanent exclusions from maintained schools in England was collected by the Department over a two-year period, starting with summer term 1990, under the national exclusions reporting system. In England, 81 pupils were excluded for drug-related offences and solvent abuse in year one and 179 in year two. The figures for physical aggression against others was 1,059 and 1,476 respectively. It is not possible to provide an area breakdown of the figure because of assurances given as to confidentiality.

Opted-out Schools (Advertisements)

Mr. Llwyd : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what was the cost of the advertisements relating to opting out of schools which have appeared in recent editions of the Radio Times.

Mr. Robin Squire : The total cost of the recent advertising campaign, which was designed to give governors, schools and parents access to the factual information published by the Department on grant-maintained status and which ran for five weeks, was around £200,000. The advertisements appeared in The Independent, The Guardian, the Sunday Times, The Mail on Sunday, The Observer, The Times Educational Supplement, as well as the Radio Times. It is not possible to disaggregate the cost of the advertisements that appeared in the Radio Times.

Mr. Llwyd : To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many respondents there have been to the advertisements regarding the opting out of schools which appeared in recent editions of the Radio Times.

Mr. Robin Squire : To date there have been almost 3,000 responses. The advertisements appeared in The Independent, The Guardian, the Sunday Times, The Mail on Sunday, The Observer, The Times Educational Supplement, as well as the Radio Times. Almost 500 of the responses were related to the advertisements in the Radio Times.

Higher Education

Mr. Alan W. Williams : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will publish a table giving the number of applicants per place on offer in higher education establishments in all major subject areas in September 1993.

Mr. Boswell : Institutions decide within the resources available to them how many students in any given subject area to admit. The ratio of home applications to acceptances/admissions through the Universities Central


Column 624

Council on Admissions and the polytechnics central admissions systems respectively for entry in autumn 1993 is shown.


                                    |UCCA<1><2>     |PCAS<1><2>                     

Subject                             |Rate of        |Rate of                        

                                    |applications to|applications to                

                                    |acceptances    |admissions                     

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Medicine and dentistry              |10.3:1         |-                              

Topics allied to medicine           |12.4:1         |11.5:1                         

Biological sciences                 |8.0:1          |10.8:1                         

Agriculture and related subjects    |7.2:1          |3.6:1                          

Physical sciences                   |6.1:1          |7.6:1                          

Mathematical sciences               |6.6:1          |5.1:1                          

Engineering and technology          |6.6:1          |5.3:1                          

Architecture, building and planning |11.1:1         |5.6:1                          

Social science                      |10.2:1         |10.4:1                         

Business and administration         |11.3:1         |7.6:1                          

Mass communication and                                                              

documentation                       |20.8:1         |11.0:1                         

Languages and related studies       |7.6:1          |11.6:1                         

Humanities                          |6.8:1          |11.6:1                         

Creative arts                       |13.0:1         |11.7:1                         

Education                           |11.6:1         |12.0:1                         

Combined subjects                   |8.9:1          |6.5:1                          

                                    |----           |----                           

Total                               |8.8:1          |8.3:1                          

Source of data:                                                                     

UCCA-Table 7 and Figure 5 from the UCCA 31st report 1992-93.                        

PCAS-PCAS statistical supplement 1992-93 due to be published by UCAS in June 1994.  

Notes:                                                                              

<1> For 1993 entry some 48 per cent. of all applicants to higher education through  

UCCA and PCAS applied to both schemes. Their applications to acceptances/admissions 

are included in both columns.                                                       

<2> The average number of applications per applicant is 4.2 and 3.5 for UCCA and    

PCASrespectively. The division of the ratios in each column by the average number   

of applications per applicant gives an approximate measure of the ratio of the      

numbers of applicants in each subject area to the numbers accepted or admitted.     

Discretionary Awards

Mr. Matthew Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many new discretionary awards were offered to students on educational courses ; and what was the value of the awards in (a) England as a whole and (b) in each local education authority for the year 1992-93 and for the year 1993-94, broken down in each case for higher education level courses and further education level courses.

Mr. Boswell : Provisional figures for the academic year 1992-93, the latest available, indicate that 131,500 new discretionary awards were made by local education authorities in England. Information on the value of new discretionary awards is not collected centrally. Information on the numbers and value of discretionary awards made by individual local education authorities and on the level of the courses supported is not yet available.

Suspended Teachers

Ms Walley : To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many (a) head teachers and (b) teachers were suspended in (i) 1992-93 and (ii) 1993- 94 following


Column 625

allegations made against them by children in schools ; and if he will estimate the teaching hours lost through suspensions.

Mr. Forth : This information is not held centrally. The power to suspend teachers rests with head teachers and governing bodies of schools with delegated budgets under schemes for the local management of schools. Local education authorities have such power only in respect of school teachers employed elsewhere. Neither schools nor LEAs are required to inform the Department for Education when they suspend a teacher.

Further Education Colleges

Mr. Thurnham : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what power he has to shorten the period of office of governors of former local authority colleges of further education ; what financial consequences he expects from failure by colleges to agree the new contract between the College Employers Forum and the Association of Teachers and Lecturers ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Boswell : My right hon. Friend does not have the power to reduce the period of office of college governors except in exceptional circumstances. Under section 57 of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, if the Secretary of State is satisfied that the affairs of any institution within the further education sector have been or are being mismanaged he may, on the recommendation of the Futher Education Funding Council, remove all or any of the members of the governing body and appoint new members in their places. Some £50 million of the Further Education Funding Council's grant will be held back in 1994-95. It will be released when college governing bodies certify that all contracts for new staff from 1 April 1994 provide adequate flexibility for the college's needs. It is for colleges to decide whether adoption of the contract recently agreed by CEF and ATL will allow them to do this.

Education Costs

Mr. Hardy : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what was the cost to public funds of the education of an average pupil at an average grant-maintained and at an average local authority secondary school in 1992 -93.

Mr. Robin Squire : The average recurrent spending per pupil in 1992- 93 was £2,450 for grant-maintained secondary schools and is estimated as being £2,182 for local authority maintained secondary schools, reflecting the greater responsibilities of the former.

Outdoor Education Centres

Mr. Jamieson : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list the names, location and county of each of the outdoor education centres in England.

Mr. Forth : This information is not collected centrally.

Disabled Student Allowance

Sir Thomas Arnold : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what is the take-up of the disabled student allowance ; how it is administered ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Boswell : Mandatory awards are made by local education authorities to eligible students attending


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full-time first degree or comparable courses and courses of initial teacher training in the United Kingdom. The disabled students' allowances are assessed by local education authorities as part of the total maintenance requirement of mandatory award holders who are obliged, by reason of their disability, to incur additional expenditure in respect of their attendance at their courses. The total assessed value of the disabled students allowances before means-testing was £1,960,000 in 1991-92, the latest year for which figures are available. Information on the numbers of students receiving the disabled students' allowances is not available.

Independent Schools

Mr. Jamieson : To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) if he will list the independent schools that have been struck off the register of independent schools in the past five years, giving the date of when they were struck off ;

(2) if he will list the private and independent schools that have received a notice of complaint from his Department within the past five years with the date of issue of the notice and the number made for each school.

Mr. Forth : In the five years 1989-94 the registrar of independent schools has caused one school, namely Hilsea college, to be struck off the register in accordance with section 73 of the Education Act 1944.

During the same period, eight schools have been served with notices of complaint under section 71 of the Act. It is not the Government's policy to name schools served with a notice of complaint, unless this leads to a subsequent decision that the school should be struck off the register.

Also, during the same period, 233 schools have voluntarily removed their names from the register. In many cases, the closure of these schools followed official letters from the registrar addressing concerns about standards of accommodation, tuition and other matters which, but for the school's voluntary closure, might have led to a notice of complaint.

School Inspections

Mr. Jamieson : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list the private and independent schools that were inspected by Her Majesty's inspectorate in the three years up to 1 September 1992, giving the date of the inspection.

Mr. Robin Squire : A list of the independent schools inspected by HMI between 1 September 1989 and 31 August 1992 showing the date of the inspection has been placed in the Library.

Mr. Jamieson : To ask the Secretary of State for Education if he will list the private and independent schools that have been inspected by Her Majesty's inspector of schools or the Office for Standards in Education in the past five years, giving the date of inspection, where the inspection led to a published report.

Mr. Robin Squire : The new Government Department, the Office for Standards in Education, was created on 1 September 1992. All inspections carried out by Her Majesty's inspectorate or reports published since that date are a matter for Ofsted. I have asked Professor Sutherland to write to the hon. Member.


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Those independent school reports are as follows :


School name                   |Date of visit                  

--------------------------------------------------------------

Annie Lawson School           |6 June 1990                    

Nanhurst School               |30 October 1989                

Oaktree House                 |11 June 1990                   

Rodney School                 |3 June 1991                    

Stonely Grange School         |14 October 1991                

The Small School at Red House |30 January 1992                

Wells Cathedral School        |1 December 1989                

Dyslexia

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) how many appeals from Doncaster education authority relating to dyslexia are being currently dealt with by his Department ;

(2) how many appeals are currently with his Department in respect of children who have been statemented by Doncaster local education authority ; how many statements have been assessed ; and how many children have been made the subject of formal assessment by Doncaster education authority for each of the last 10 years ;

(3) how many children have been (a) statemented and (b) formally assessed by Doncaster education authority in each year for the last 10 years, whose special need is as a result of diagnosis of dyslexia.

Mr. Forth : The Department is currently dealing with two appeals from parents of children with special educational needs in Doncaster. Neither of these children has dyslexia.

Information on the number of formal assessments and statements made by Doncaster LEA, for each year since 1984, is shown in the table. Information is not available centrally on the special need or needs for which a given statement was issued.

Sixth Forms

Mr. Rooker : To ask the Secretary of State for Education what are the expected numbers of pupils in each of the new sixth forms he announced on 16 February in Departmental press notice 42/94.

Mr. Robin Squire : The total numbers of pupils in the sixth forms concerned are expected to be :


                                          |Number       

--------------------------------------------------------

The Arnewood School, Hampshire            |236          

The Burgate School, Hampshire             |120          

Chellaston School, Derbyshire             |200          

The King John School, Essex               |282          

The Merrill Community School,Derbyshire   |100          

Ringwood School, Hampshire                |120          

Sheringham High School, Norfolk           |120          

New school for pupils aged 11 to 18 years               

in Halifax, Calderdale                    |120          


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SOCIAL SECURITY

Family Credit

Ms Corston : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will make it his policy for lone parents to be reassessed for family credit, if their circumstances change, one month or more after the previous assessment.

Mr. Burt : No. Family credit awards are fixed for 26 weeks and neither increases nor decreases in income during that period are taken into account. This works to the advantage of many beneficiaries.

Ms Corston : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many lone mothers on family credit were affected by the regulations introduced by his Department on 7 February to reduce the maintenance payments from their former partners ; and how much money on average they will lose before their family credit is reassessed.

Mr. Burt : We estimate that there are fewer than 1,000 families whose family credit awards have been based on a Child Support Agency maintenance assessment figure and where this maintenance may be liable to reduction as a result of the recent child support changes. We estimate that the average loss per family will be under £100 in total. However, those families entitled to housing benefit and council tax benefit, or who become entitled following changes in maintenance, could recover up to 85 per cent. of their loss through an increase of those benefits.

Ms Corston : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will reimburse lone mothers at their next assessment for family credit for loss of income incurred as a result of the regulations introduced on 7 February to reduce the level of maintenance payments from their former partners ;

(2) whether he will ensure that funds will be made available to reimburse lone parents on family credit for losses incurred in income as a result of DSS regulations introduced on 7 February to reduce the level of maintenance payments from their former partners.

Mr. Burt : Family credit awards are fixed for 26 weeks and neither increases or decreases in income during that period are taken into account. This works to the advantage of many beneficiaries. Any reduction in maintenance during the period of a family credit award will be taken into account in assessing the renewal award. However, those families entitled to housing benefit and council tax benefit, or who become entitled following changes in maintenance, could recover up to 85 per cent. of any loss through an increase of those benefits.

Ministerial Offices

Mr. Boyes : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what was the cost of new furniture for his private office during the year 1993- 94.

Mr. Hague : My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has had no new furniture for his private office in 1993-94.

Income Support (Further Education)

Mrs. Wise : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will amend regulations so as to ensure that parents on income support receiving allowances and


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benefits on account of their children in further education should continue to receive the allowances after the children turn 19 until the end of the young person's course of study ;

(2) what study he has made of the effect of the withdrawal from parents on income support of benefits and allowances in respect of young people following courses in further education, when those young people reach the age of 19 years ; and how many students then give up their courses as a result.

Mr. Burt : We believe that young people remaining at school after their 19th birthday to complete their studies, and their families, should turn for any necessary additional financial assistance to the sources of funding available through the educational maintenance system.

The information requested about the numbers involved is not available.

Industrial Injuries Compensation

Mr. Redmond : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what amount was recovered, under section 22 of the Social Security Act 1989, from the damages paid to victims of industrial injury for (a) the Doncaster area, (b) South Yorkshire as a whole by year for the last four years and (c) the current year to date.

Mr. Hague : This information is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Value Added Tax

Mr. Llew Smith : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what schemes he has launched to compensate disabled people for the increased value added tax being introduced from 1 April.

Mr. Scott : Details of the extra help in respect of VAT on domestic fuel were given in reply to my hon. Friend the Member for Gainsborough and Horncastle (Mr. Leigh) on 30 November 1993 at columns 437-38.

Prisoners (Resettlement Grants)

Mr. Denham : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) what guidance is given to social fund officers regarding the priority given to resettlement grants to those leaving prison ;

(2) if he will make it his policy to ensure that resettlement grants to those leaving prison are given high priority in all areas of the country.

Mr. Scott : People leaving prison are among those specifically included in my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State's list of groups normally to be given priority for community care grants. Guidance on priority groups is contained in the social fund guide, in the Library. However, it is for each individual social fund officer, who acts independently, to decide the priority of an application after fully considering all the circumstances of the particular case.

Pensions

Mr. Radice : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what has been the cost to date to public funds of the incentive for contracting out pensions.

Mr. Hague : The cost to the national insurance fund to date of the 2 per cent. incentive to newly contracted-out pensions is estimated at £3.6 billion.


Column 630

Mr. Radice : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many rebate-only personal pensions have been sold since they were introduced ; what is the estimated administrative expense involved in each case ; what controls there are over administrative expenses in such cases ; and what requirements as to warnings to purchasers comparing the risks and expense overheads compared with the state earnings-related pension scheme have been made by the DSS.

Mr. Hague : The information is not available in the form requested. Since 1988, the Contributions Agency has received 6,456,901 applications to contract out of SERPS by way of an appropriate personal pension--although the number of APP holders in any one year would be less than that. Inland Revenue data suggest that, in the financial year 1991-92, 2.1 million APP holders made payments in addition to the DSS contribution. Information about the administrative expenses connected with those pensions is not available. Rules on the marketing of personal pensions and other investment products are a matter for the Securities and Investments Board.

Mr. Radice : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what has been the estimated total administrative expense of appropriate personal pensions and the equivalent anticipated administrative expenses for the contracted-out cohort through the national insurance fund.

Mr. Hague : The information requested is not available.

Benefits, London

Mrs. Bridget Prentice : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many people are currently receiving (a) attendance allowance, (b) disability allowance, (c) family credit, (d) income support, (e) invalidity benefit and (f) sickness benefit in each of the London boroughs ; and what were the respective figures for 1990.

Mr. Burt : The information requested is not readily available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Mrs. Bridget Prentice : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate for the Lewisham area the number of people who will be affected by the decision to reduce the entitlement to unemployment benefit from 12 months to six months ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Burt : The information is not available. I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave to the hon. Member for Ealing, Southall (Mr. Khabra) on 18 January at column 559.

VAT (Domestic Fuel)

Mrs. Bridget Prentice : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how much financial assistance will be made available by the Government to individual residents of sheltered housing units with communal facilities to help them meet increased costs resulting from the imposition of VAT on domestic fuel.


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