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Community Care

Mr. Llwyd : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what amounts were spent on the community care programme for each county council area, each district council area and for Wales as a whole since the introduction of the programme ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Gwilym Jones : Information on the amounts spent by local authorities on the care in the community


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programme is not collected centrally. However, the amounts identified within the overall standard spending assessments for each county in Wales are given in the following table. Separately identifiable provision was not made for district councils.


Provision for care in the community     

identified within standard spending     

assessments                             

£ million                               

                |1993-94|1994-95        

----------------------------------------

Clwyd           |6.8    |14.4           

Dyfed           |4.6    |10.7           

Gwent           |5.5    |12.6           

Gwynedd         |3.5    |8.0            

Mid Glamorgan   |5.1    |13.6           

Powys           |1.6    |3.6            

South Glamorgan |4.9    |11.0           

West Glamorgan  |5.4    |12.1           

                |-------|-------        

Wales           |37.5   |86.0           

ERDF Grants

Sir Teddy Taylor : To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what has been the total of European regional development fund grants accruing to local authorities in Wales in each of the most recent five years ; if he will make a statement clarifying the manner in which such grants are taken into account in assessing the standard spending assessments of local authorities in Wales ; and what recent changes there have been in such procedures.

Mr. Gwilym Jones : The total amount of ERDF paid to local authorities in Wales in each of the most recent five years is provided in the following table.

Each local authority's outstanding loan debt is taken into account when it's standard spending assessment is determined.

Since ERDF grants are used to redeem debt, the relevant debt figures for each authority is reduced annually by the amount of ERDF grant it has received up to the end of the last full financial year for which payments information is available. This procedure, which is agreed with the Welsh local authority associations, has not changed in recent years. Further details may be found in the "Local Government Finance Report (Wales) 1994- 95" (HC 168).


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ERDF Grant Payments made to Local Authorities by Financial Year                       

Authority           |1989-90   |1990-91   |1991-92   |1992-93   |1993-94              

                    |£         |£         |£         |£         |£                    

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aberconwy           |0         |0         |0         |0         |0                    

Alyn and Deeside    |0         |308,000   |677,000   |4,000     |138,000              

Arfon               |58,000    |0         |0         |65,000    |344,000              

Blaenau Gwent       |105,000   |73,000    |407,000   |150,000   |398,000              

Brecknock           |10,000    |0         |117,000   |0         |107,000              

Cardiff             |1,841,000 |273,000   |687,000   |1,982,000 |72,000               

Carmarthen          |98,000    |0         |127,000   |0         |0                    

Ceredigion          |60,000    |66,000    |369,000   |570,000   |249,000              

Clwyd               |1,501,000 |292,000   |2,318,000 |2,123,000 |1,721,000            

Colwyn              |0         |0         |0         |0         |159,000              

Cynon Valley        |203,000   |85,000    |288,000   |430,000   |1,400,000            

Delyn               |292,000   |856,000   |764,000   |431,000   |496,000              

Dinefwr             |201,000   |1,000     |0         |575,000   |131,000              

Dwyfor              |0         |1,141,000 |826,000   |858,000   |322,000              

Dyfed               |175,000   |1,858,000 |10,640,000|1,043,000 |4,053,000            

Glyndwr             |0         |74,000    |3,000     |0         |0                    

Gwent               |115,000   |1,315,000 |3,634,000 |1,565,000 |2,791,000            

Gwynedd             |1,448,000 |1,091,000 |2,492,000 |595,000   |1,541,000            

Islwyn              |6,000     |0         |1,116,000 |121,000   |834,000              

Llanelli            |465,000   |25,000    |574,000   |1,139,000 |1,032,000            

Lliw Valley         |0         |0         |185,000   |139,000   |225,000              

Meirionnydd         |31,000    |780,000   |784,000   |1,698,000 |997,000              

Merthyr Tydfil      |10,000    |13,000    |0         |0         |147,000              

Mid Glamorgan       |4,956,000 |4,291,000 |1,997,000 |3,694,000 |4,448,000            

Monmouth            |0         |0         |121,000   |73,000    |38,000               

Montgomeryshire     |642,000   |24,000    |1,270,000 |1,074,000 |329,000              

Neath               |74,000    |37,000    |709,000   |0         |374,000              

Newport             |261,000   |358,000   |741,000   |1,960,000 |765,000              

Ogwr                |708,000   |83,000    |0         |96,000    |274,000              

Port Talbot         |81,000    |0         |0         |0         |47,000               

Powys               |1,023,000 |249,000   |1,824,000 |1,815,000 |661,000              

Preseli Pembroke    |58,000    |0         |1,158,000 |556,000   |173,000              

Radnorshire         |31,000    |0         |316,000   |745,000   |169,000              

Rhondda             |415,000   |658,000   |907,000   |270,000   |807,000              

Rhuddlan            |3,000     |981,000   |1,956,000 |1,682,000 |1,011,000            

Rhymney Valley      |288,000   |77,000    |539,000   |185,000   |289,000              

South Glamorgan     |286,000   |69,000    |2,689,000 |5,210,000 |1,016,000            

South Pembrokeshire |405,000   |288,000   |43,000    |0         |131,000              

Swansea             |0         |3,924,000 |215,000   |1,228,000 |1,456,000            

Taff Ely            |0         |19,000    |97,000    |238,000   |277,000              

Torfaen             |120,000   |706,000   |383,000   |1,219,000 |1,015,000            

Vale of Glamorgan   |0         |6,000     |517,000   |205,000   |155,000              

West Glamorgan      |1,556,000 |291,000   |5,582,000 |2,715,000 |2,386,000            

Wrexham Maelor      |0         |240,000   |2,259,000 |476,000   |132,000              

Ynys Mon            |710,000   |436,000   |1,404,000 |40,000    |82,000               

                    |-------   |-------   |-------   |-------   |-------              

Total               |18,218,000|20,988,000|50,735,000|36,969,000|33,192,000           

HOUSE OF COMMONS

Office Furnishings

39. Mr. Steen : To ask the Chairman of the Finance and Services Committee how much will be spent in the next two financial years on office furnishing in the parliamentary estate.

Mr. Channon : Under the 10-year rolling programme of works some £260,000 has been set aside for office furniture in each of the next two financial years.

Child Care

40. Mr. Khabra : To ask the right hon. Member for

Berwick-upon-Tweed, as representing the House of Commons Commission what is the timetable for progress on child care arrangements in Parliament.

Mr. Beith : I refer the hon. Member to the reply that I gave earlier to the hon. Member for Lewisham, East (Mrs. Prentice).

European Debates

46. Mr. Spearing : To ask the Lord President of the Council what considerations he takes into account when placing notices in the Order Paper to suspend Standing Order No. 102 relating to debates on matters concerning the European Community and Union.

Mr. Newton : A motion is occasionally tabled to de-refer a European Community document which stands referred to a European Standing Committee, so that it may be debated on the Floor of the House. The considerations will vary depending on the nature of the document concerned.


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Sitting Hours

48. Dr. Spink : To ask the Lord President of the Council what progress he has made in respect of reforming the sittings arrangements for the House.

Mr. Newton : I am currently engaged in constructive discussions with the hon. Member for Newcastle upon Tyne, East (Mr. Brown). Our aim is to find ways of enabling the House to do its business in more sensible ways, at more sensible hours, without either unacceptably reducing the Government's capacity to carry their programme or unacceptably reducing the Opposition's flexibility in deploying and pressing their case. It is my hope that those discussions will enable us to map the way forward before the summer recess.

EC Legislation

49. Mr. Jenkin : To ask the Lord President of the Council what plans he has considered to improve the scrutiny of EC legislation by the United Kingdom Parliament in advance of its enactment by the Council of Ministers.

Mr. Newton : I expect to respond shortly to the report by the Select Committee on European Legislation entitled "Scrutiny after Maastricht" (First Special Report, 1993-94) which contained detailed proposals for the scrutiny of legislative proposals under the co-decision procedure.

Parliamentary Questions

Mr. Winnick : To ask the Lord President of the Council if he will list those hon. Members who have had oral questions 1 to 10 to the Secretary of State for Employment more than three times during 1994.

Mr. Newton : None.


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Mr. Winnick : To ask the Lord President of the Council if he will list those hon. Members who have had questions 1 to 6 to the Prime Minister more than four times in 1994 to date.

Mr. Newton : The hon. Member for Chesham and Amersham (Mrs. Gillan) has had five such questions to the Prime Minister.

Visitors

41. Mr. Kilfoyle : To ask the Lord President of the Council what is his timetable for improving facilities for visitors to the House of Commons.

Mr. Newton : It is hoped that the House will have an opportunity to consider the recommendations contained in the Catering Committee's First Report of Session 1992-93 on Line of Route facilities before the summer recess.

TRANSPORT

Piggyback Rail System

8. Mr. Robert Ainsworth : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to support the introduction of a lorry piggyback rail system between the channel tunnel and the midlands.

Mr. Freeman : The proposal to build a piggyback freight railway from the midlands to the channel tunnel is being put forward by a private sector group. It is for them to seek planning permission and finance. The Government have not been asked to assist the project. More generally, we welcome in principle any worthwhile proposal to ship more freight by rail, either conventional containers or the whole lorry trailer and load.

London Underground

10. Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what proposals he has in respect of train maintenance on the London underground.

Mr. Norris : The maintenance of London's underground system is an operational matter for London Underground Limited.

Road Traffic, Eastbourne

13. Mr. Waterson : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he last had the opportunity to consider the road traffic needs of Eastbourne.

Mr. Key : Last month, when I visited the area.

Runway Capacity

14. Mr. Haselhurst : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to announce the Government's response to the consultation on the report on runway capacity in the south east.

Mr. Norris : We are currently considering the responses to the RUCATSE consultation and expect to respond before the end of the year.

Motorways

15. Mrs. Gillan : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information he has on the proportion of car owners who regularly use motorways.


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Mr. Key : Research commissioned by the Department and summarised in the Green Paper, "Paying for Better Motorways" (Cm 2200), indicates that only about half of car drivers use motorways most months or more frequently.

River Crossings

16. Mr. Evennett : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects to be able to make a further statement on river crossings and improved transport facilities in south-east London.

Mr. Norris : I am reviewing the strategy for river crossings in east London. I hope to make an announcement later this summer.

Rail Privatisation

18. Mr. Michael Brown : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessments he has made of the effects on passengers resulting from plans to privatise the railways.

Mr. Freeman : I refer my hon. Friend to the reply that I gave to my hon. Friend the Member for Altrincham and Sale (Sir F. Montgomery) earlier today.

Mr. Barry Field : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what indications there are from previous privatisations of transport industries of the effects on passengers of the privatisation of British Rail.

Mr. Freeman : Previous privatisations have consistently led to improved services for customers and greater efficiency for the industries concerned. The same will happen on the railways.

26. Mr. Mullin : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the line closures that are likely to result from the privatisation of British Rail ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Freeman : There is no reason for privatisation to lead to any increase in the number of lines or stations being proposed for closure. The safeguards are at least as strong as they have been in the past.

Aircraft Noise, Gatwick

19. Mr. Peter Ainsworth : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement on the level of noise caused by night -time commercial aircraft movements around Gatwick airport.

Mr. Norris : The night restrictions that we have set at Gatwick are designed to keep the night noise level below that in summer 1988.

Rail Franchises

20. Mr. Bayley : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement about the timetable for franchising railway services.

Mr. Freeman : My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has set a target timetable for the franchising of services by the franchising director. The first six franchises are to be awarded by the end of 1995, and over half of British Rail's current passenger services are to be


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franchised by April 1996. The franchising director published a programme in April setting out how he intends to meet these targets.

Rail Services (Competition)

21. Sir Trevor Skeet : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what results he expects from the introduction of competition in terms of improving rail services.

Mr. Freeman : Evidence from previous transport privatisations shows that the introduction of competition encourages the development of better quality services. I am confident that customers--passengers and freight consignors--will benefit from more services of higher quality, improved efficiency and better value for money.

Transatlantic Air Routes

22. Mr. John Marshall : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress he has made towards liberalisation of transatlantic air routes.

23. Mr. Gallie : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress he has made towards liberalisation of transatlantic air routes.

Mr. Norris : When my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Transport met the US transportation secretary last month he once again signalled the United Kingdom's willingness to continue talks. We hope that the United Kingdom's approval of the Virgin/Delta deal will help get the talks going again.

A12

24. Mr. Jenkin : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement about proposals for a new junction to be constructed on the A12 to join with the A134 at Great Hawkesley.

Mr. Key : The Department has no plans to increase capacity on this section of the A12, nor to construct any new junctions. We would therefore expect the cost of any new A12-A134 interchange which might be needed to facilitate development to be met by the developers.

Railtrack

25. Mrs. Dunwoody : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the number of occasions, the reasons, and the cost to public funds of the use of helicopters by employees of Railtrack.

Mr. Freeman : This is a matter for Railtrack, but I understand from it that there has been no use of helicopters by its employees.

Air Fares

27. Mr. Deva : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what effect the third aviation package is having on air fares in Europe.

Mr. Norris : EC carriers are now free to set their own fares, and the EC licensing and market access provisions encourage competition. Since the beginning of 1993 we have seen some straight fare reductions, and various offers of seasonal tickets and promotional fares.


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Residential Areas

Ms Coffey : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to reduce the volume and speed of traffic in residential areas.

Mr. Key : It is for local highway authorities to design schemes which control the volume and speed of traffic on their roads. My Department provides technical advice on the regulations and individual design features in circulars and traffic advisory leaflets.

Kidderminster, Blakedown, Hagley Bypass

Mr. Anthony Coombs : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what are the public costs associated with the Kidderminster, Blakedown. Hagley bypass incurred so far ; and if he will break this down between (a) design, (b) compulsory purchase and (c) public inquiry costs.

Mr. Key : The question relates to matters which are the responsibility of the Highways Agency ; the chief executive will write to the hon. Member.

Letter from Lawrie Haynes to Mr. Anthony Coombs, dated 16 June 1994 :

You asked the Secretary of State for Transport about the public costs incurred so far with the Kidderminster, Blakedown and Hagley Bypass and if he would give a breakdown between : (a) design, (b) compulsory purchase and (c) public inquiry.

The overall cost so far is about £15.4 million (inclusive of VAT). This does not include in-house staff costs, which are not readily available but are comparatively small.

Of this, design costs amount ot £1.95 million. This includes the costs of a number of consultants, ground investigation works and an archaeological survey, and of printing and compiling a range of documents.

We have not yet reached compulsory purchase stage, but we have acquired property under either statutory or discretionary blight at a cost of £13.26 million. We will however be in a position to sell many of these properties after completion of the scheme and in the meantime many are rented to tenants. The net cost will therefore be lower.

The direct cost of the Public Inquiry was about £189,000, not including the costs of our consultants for this purpose, which are included in the figures above.

Cones Hotline

Mr. Donohoe : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will make a statement on his Department's cones inquiry line.

Mr. Key : As the cones hotline is not an operational matter for the Highways Agency, the chief executive has written to the hon. Member. Letter from Lawrie Haynes to Mr. Brian Donohue dated 16 June 1994 :

You asked the Secretary of State for Transport if he would make a statement on the Department's cones enquiry line. As this is an operational matter for the Highways Agency, I am replying to your question.

The cones hotline has been running for exactly two years. In that time it has dealt with 5,200 telephone calls of which just over 3,000 have been pursued as formal complaints or requests for information. It gives motorists direct access to the highway authority responsible for the motorway and trunk road network ; and as such fits squarely with the wider Citizen's Charter initiative and the policy of improving driver information.

The Cones Hotline is covered by the Highways Agency's Road User's Charter' which sets out standards of service for the


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road network. In following this we undertake to deal with Hotline enquiries as efficiently as possible ; and if it is established that there is no good reason for cones to be present, we undertake to get them removed.

We have recently invited expressions of interest, through the EC Journal, from specialist companies who might be well placed to run the Cones Hotline on the Agency's behalf. This is part of a continuing review to ensure that the Hotline provides the most efficient and effective service.

Railway Property (Hunt Trespass)

Mr. Morley : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many incidents of hunt trespass on railway property have been recorded to date in 1994.

Mr. Freeman : There are six recorded incidents of hunt trespass on railway property to date this year.

Marine Safety

Ms Walley : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how he proposes to introduce the proposed 20 per cent. efficiency savings into the Marine Safety Agency.

Mr. Norris : Plans for delivering this saving are still being formulated.

Civil Servants

Mrs. Dunwoody : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his answer of 4 May, Official Report , column 565 , what percentage of male grade 7s received (a) box 1 and (b) box 2 markings in 1991-92, what were the figures for typists ; what proportion of typists were (i) male and (ii) female ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Norris : In the 1991-92 reporting year, 4.7 per cent. of male grade 7s received box 1 and 52.4 per cent. box 2 performance markings. No male typist received a box 1 or 2 marking. 0.3 per cent. of typist grades were male and 99.7 per cent. female.

DISC Project

Mrs. Dunwoody : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his answer of 7 March, Official Report , column 3 , what is the total cost to date of the DISC network policy project ; and what tangible results have been obtained from the expenditure thereon.

Mr. Norris : The DISC network policy project finished in July 1993 when a policy governing the provision of wide-area computer network services was endorsed by the departmental Information Systems Committee. The project to develop the policy cost approximately £117, 000--made up of consulting fees and official time. The end product was a policy that defines the framework within which the Department's executive agencies and other units address their individual requirements for data communications and the mechanism by which the Department as a whole achieves economies of scale in meeting these requirements.

Heathrow and Gatwick Airports

Dr. Marek : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will give details of the latest projections he has received from United Kingdom airlines of the proportion of both full day peak and morning peak time slots scheduled for a typical mid-August 1994 week at Heathrow and Gatwick as a proportion of total slots available for both periods.


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Mr. Norris : In a 1994 mid-August week the proportions of available slots allocated to airlines in the full-day peak--0700-2059--and the morning peak--0700-1159--are, respectively, 96.8 per cent. and 98.5 per cent. at Heathrow, and 95.2 per cent. and 95.9 per cent. at Gatwick.

Mrs. Dunwoody : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his answer of 7 March, Official Report, column 3, on the study of EC directives undertaken by Coopers and Lybrand, what consideration was given to using civil service staff to undertake the work ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Norris : Support from consultants was used as resources were not available within the Department to carry out all the work required in the limited time available.

Information Campaigns

Mrs. Dunwoody : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Truro (Mr. Taylor) of 3 March, Official Report, column 833, if he will list the budgets for the various public information campaigns for the current financial year ; and if he will make a statement on the extent to which the budgets will be affected following his recent statement of the 20 per cent. efficiency gains.

Mr. Norris : The budgets provisionally allocated to the various public information campaigns planned for the current financial year are as follows :


                                        |£ million          

------------------------------------------------------------

Road safety campaigns                   |6.30               

  drink drive                           |2.50               

  kill your speed and child road safety |3.00               

  other road safety                     |0.80               

                                                            

Other transport safety and public                           

  information campaigns                 |0.65               

These budgets are not affected by the recently announced 20 per cent. efficiency gains statement, but as with all voted expenditure they are constantly reviewed in the light of the priorities and the resources available to meet them.

Responsibility for marine and coastal public information campaigns and the relevant budgets is being transferred to the Marine Safety Agency and the Coastguard Agency.

Rail Staff Pay Offer

Mr. Dobson : To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he or any of his Ministers or civil servants had any communications with members of the board of British Rail or Railtrack on the subject of the signalling staff pay offer ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. MacGregor [holding answer 17 June 1994] : Negotiations about the pay of signalling staff are a matter for Railtrack. But I, my Ministers and senior civil servants have made clear to members of the boards of British Railways and Railtrack on a number of occasions the importance which the Government attach to controlling public expenditure and restraining paybill costs.


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