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3rd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

1st Battalion The Royal Highland Fusiliers (Princess Margaret's Own Glasgow and Ayrshire Regiment).

1st Battalion The King's Own Scottish Borderers.

1st Battalion The Staffordshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales's). 3. Bosnia.

1st Battalion Coldstream Guards.

2nd Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment.

1st Battalion The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire. 1st Battalion The Cheshire Regiment.

1st Battalion The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding). 4. Northern Ireland since 1990.

3rd Field Regiment Royal Horse Artillery.

5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards.

9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's).

15th/19th Kings Royal Hussars.

1st Royal Tank Regiment.

3rd Royal Tank Regiment.

2nd Regiment Royal Artillery.

4th Field Regiment Royal Artillery

16th (Air Defence) Regiment Royal Artillery.

22nd Regiment Royal Artillery.

26th Regiment Royal Artillery.

32nd Regiment Royal Artillery.

45th Field Regiment Royal Artillery.

1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

1st Battalion Coldstream Guards.

2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards.

1st Battalion Scots Guards.

2nd Battalion Scots Guards.

1st Battalion Irish Guards.

1st Battalion Welsh Guards.

1st Battalion The Royal Scots (The Royal Regiment).

3rd Battalion The Queen's Regiment.

1st Battalion The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment.

2nd Battalion The Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment.

1st Battalion The King's Own Royal Border Regiment.

2nd Battalion The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

1st Battalion The King's Regiment.

1st Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment.

2nd Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment.

3rd Battalion The Royal Anglian Regiment.

1st Battalion The Devonshire and Dorset Regiment.

2nd Battalion The Light Infantry

3rd Battalion The Light Infantry.

1st Battalion The Prince of Wales's Own Regiment of Yorkshire. 1st Battalion The Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment).

1st Battalion The Cheshire Regiment.

1st Battalion The Royal Welch Fusiliers.

1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Wales (24th/41st Foot). 1st Battalion The King's Own Scottish Borderers.

2nd Battalion The Royal Irish Rangers.

1st Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment.

1st Battalion The Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment (29th/45th Foot).

1st Battalion The Royal Hampshire Regiment.

1st Battalion The Staffordshire Regiment (Prince of Wales's). 1st Battalion The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment). 1st Battalion The Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment (Berkshire and Wiltshire).

1st Battalion the Queen's Own Highlanders (Seaforth and Camerons).

1st Battalion The Gordon Highlanders.

1st Battalion The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders (Princess Louise's).

1st Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

3rd Battalion The Parachute Regiment.

1st Battalion The Royal Green Jackets.

2nd Battalion The Royal Green Jackets.


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3rd Battalion The Royal Green Jackets.

Notes :

1. The list for Northern Ireland covers resident battalions and major roulements only and does not include Royal Marines deployed in the infantry role and Royal Irish Home Service Battalions. 2. Details for the Falkland Islands only given up to 1991 when reduction to Company strength was made.

Iraq (Friendly Fire)

Mr. John Greenway : To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he has yet received the results of the United States board of inquiry into the shooting down of two Black Hawk helicopters over northern Iraq on 14 April ; if the bereaved families have been informed ; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Hanley : The United States Government have today announced the results of their board of inquiry. I have placed a copy of the executive summary, summary of facts and United States news release in the Libraries of both Houses. The board of inquiry concluded that a combination of human error and organisational failures led to a tragic sequence of events resulting in the shooting down of the two Black Hawk helicopters. The bereaved families visited the Adjutant General and myself at the Ministry of Defence this afternoon, before receiving a briefing at the United States embassy from the ambassador and a representative of the United States air force in Europe.

34

OVERSEAS DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

Russia

Mr. Cohen : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what consideration Her Majesty's Government and other Group of Seven nations gave to a Marshall-aid type programme to Russia ; and what were the reasons for their decision.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : When they met in Tokyo last year, G7 leaders agreed a package of assistance to the Russian Federation worth $43.4 billion. They discussed progress on implementing this package in Naples on 8 to 10 July. A copy of the summit communique has been placed in the Libraries of the House.

World Health Organisation

Mr. Worthington : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made to the World Health Organisation about the improvement of its performance in crisis situations in developing countries.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : We welcome the World Health Organisation's increasing role in emergency situations and have supported its emergency work in a number of countries.

The United Kingdom, through its official representatives to WHO, maintains a continuing dialogue with the division of emergency and humanitarian action on how best the division should develop its activities in providing assistance in emergency situations. We have fully supported the recent setting up, by WHO, of a task force to


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examine this role. It is still working on its recommendations which we will examine carefully when they are released.

Aid and Development Targets

Mr. Tom Clarke : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will list the targets on aid and development co- operation established by the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, by the United Nations and by its agencies, including targets established at the world summit for children, Jomtien education-for-all conference, United Nations conferences on the least developed countries and the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development ; which of these targets the United Kingdom has accepted ; and what progress towards these targets has been made by the United Kingdom to date.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : There are three United Nations targets, accepted by the United Kingdom, for resource transfers to the developing countries. These are :

(i) The United Nations Target for total net official development assistance (oda) to all developing countries equal to 0.7 per cent. of GNP. In 1993 United Kingdom net oda totalled £1.9 billion, equivalent to 0.31 per cent. of GNP ;

(ii) the United Nations target for total official and private flows to developing countries equal to 1 per cent. of GNP. In 1992, the United Kingdom spent 0.89 per cent. of GNP on total flows ; and (

(iii) the United Nations Target for net oda to Least Developed Countries (LLDCs) equal to 0.15 per cent. of GNP. In 1991-92 the United Kingdom spent an average of 0.10 per cent. on net oda to LLDCs. (United Kingdom aid to India and Pakistan, two of our largest country programmes, does not score against this target even though both countries are poorer than many LLDCs).

The world summit for children did not establish specific targets. It did, however, identify goals in such areas as child survival and development ; child health ; basic education, and the protection of children living in difficult circumstances. We were one of the first industrialised countries to publish its national report in response to the summit. The report, published in July 1992 by Command 1984, contains detailed information on the help we are giving to assist children in developing countries through our aid programme. Our commitment to the declaration and plan of action agreed at the summit is borne out in the pattern of activity supported by the aid programme. This programme benefits children directly, through health and education, and indirectly through safe water projects. In the financial year 1992-93 over £180 million or more than 31 per cent. of that part of our bilateral aid which can be allocated by sector, was spent in the social sectors such as education, health care, clean water and safe sanitation.

No new targets were set at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development. We have, however, taken an active part in the successful fulfilment of the agreements at UNCED, as expressed in Agenda 21, to restructure the global environment facility, to agree a convention on desertification and to hold a conference on the sustainable development of small island developing states, which adopted an action plan.

We support the shift to basic education for all children, youth and adults which was adopted by the Jomtien conference in 1990. The Jomtien declaration reaffirmed the right of all people to education--and urged countries and


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donors to allocate more resources to primary education, literary programmes and basic training. The amount we allocate to basic education has increased from £6 million in 1991-92 to around £15 million in 1992-93.

Bangladesh

Mr. Simon Hughes : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on Government aid policy with regard to Bangladesh.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave the hon. Member for Liverpool, Riverside (Mr. Parry) on Thursday 23 June 1994, Official Report, column 272 .

Bosnia

Dr. Goodson-Wickes : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what consultations he has had with his European counterparts to improve the delivery of humanitarian aid in Bosnia.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd : I refer my hon. Friend to the reply he received from my right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary on 27 June 1994, Official Report, 411. We are playing an active part with EU partners in the EU administration of Mostar.

Indonesia

Mr. Andrew Smith : To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on Her Majesty's Government's policy for aid to Indonesia, indicating whether such aid is to be targeted in the future ; and what arrangements Her Majesty's Government are making for its independent monitoring.

Mr. Lennox-Boyd [holding answer 11 July 1994] : Her Majesty's Government provide assistance for Indonesia because it is still a relatively poor country, is pursuing sound economic policies, has an impressive record of poverty reduction and is generally an effective user of aid. In agreement with the Indonesian Government, the United Kingdom aid programme is focused on natural resources including forestry, education, public administration, energy efficiency and transportation. We monitor the progress of projects through regular reports from the project authorities and through monitoring visits by ODA staff. The overall programme is reviewed every two years by ODA senior management.

SOCIAL SECURITY

Medical Referrals

Mr. Bradley : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many claims for sickness and invalidity benefit were referred to the regional medical services in each quarter since September 1993 ; how many of these cases resulted in a medical examination ; and what were the outcomes (a) where examinations took place and (b) where they did not.

Mr. Scott : The administration of sickness benefit and invalidity benefit is a matter for Mr. Michael Bichard, the chief executive of the Benefits Agency. He will write to the hon. Member with such information as is available.


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Letter from Michael Bichard to Mr. Keith Bradley, dated 12 July 1994 :

The Secretary of State for Social Security has asked me to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many claims for sickness and invalidity benefit were referred to the regional medical services in each quarter since September 1993 ; how many of these cases resulted in a medical examination ; and what were the outcomes (a) where examination took place and (b) where they did not. Figures are not yet available for the quarter ending 30 June 1994. Those figures which are available are shown in the attached table. I hope you find this information helpful.


Outcome of claims to Sickness/Invalidity Benefit referred to Regional                   

Medical Services in each Quarter since September 1993                                   

                                        |September 1993-|January 1994-                  

                                        |December 1993  |March 1994                     

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total cleared                           |230,000        |269,000                        

Examination-capable of own work         |5,000          |5,000                          

Examination-capable of alternative work |25,000         |28,000                         

Examination-incapable of all work       |48,000         |54,000                         

No examination-incapable not examined   |131,000        |159,000                        

No examination-claim terminated         |3,000          |3,000                          

No examination-failed to attend         |17,000         |20,000                         

Notes:                                                                                  

1. Based upon a 100 per cent. count of cases, rounded to the nearest                    

thousand                                                                                

2. Figures include severe disablement allowance references.                             

Mr. Bradley : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many referrals to the Benefits Agency medical service were made during 1992 -93 and 1993-94 of claimants of (a) sickness benefit, (b) severe disablement allowance and (c) invalidity benefit ; and what percentage of each were found (i) capable of alternative work and (ii) capable of normal occupation.

Mr. Scott : The administration of sickness benefit and invalidity benefit is a matter for Mr. Michael Bichard, the chief executive of the Benefits Agency. He will write to the hon. Member with such information as is available.

Letter from Michael Bichard to Mr. Keith Bradley, dated 12 July 1994 :

The Secretary of State for Social Security has asked me to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question asking how many referrals to the Benefits Agency Medical Services were made during 1992-93 and 1993-94 of claimants of (a) sickness benefit, (b) severe disablement allowance and (c) invalidity benefit ; and what percentage of each were found (i) capable of alternative work and (ii) capable of normal occupation.

The Benefits Agency Medical Service (BAMS) are asked an opinion on incapacity in relation to Sickness Benefit, Invalidity Benefit, and Severe Disablement Allowance. I regret that the figures of cases cleared are not separated into the different benefits. The total figures for the three benefits are as follows :


                             |Number   |Per cent.          

-----------------------------------------------------------

1992-93                                                    

References cleared           |872,000  |-                  

Capable of alternative work  |62,000   |7.1                

Capable of normal occupation |38,000   |4.4                

                                                           

1993-94                                                    

References cleared           |1,021,000|-                  

Capable of alternative work  |100,000  |9.8                

Capable of normal occupation |22,000   |2.2                

Note: Figures subject to rounding to nearest thousand.     

I hope you find this reply helpful.

Disability (Consultation)

Mr. Alan Howarth : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will make it his policy to widen the Government's consultation on disability to include (a) transport, (b) education and (c) the adoption of comprehensive civil rights legislation ;

(2) if he will make a statement detailing the terms of reference and time scales for the Government's consultation on disability discrimination issues ;

(3) what criteria were used by his Department in determining the areas for discussion in the consultation on disability.

Mr. Scott : My right hon. Friend the Prime Minister informed the House on 10 May that consultation would take place within six months on proposals in the fields of employment, access to goods and services, financial services, access to buildings, and the establishment of a new advisory body on disability. A consultation document will be issued very shortly.

Invalidity Benefit

Mr. Bradley : To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what are the estimated savings to his Department in (a) 1995-96, (b) 1996-97 and (c) 1997-98 resulting from (i) freezing the additional pension payable with invalidity benefit and (ii) abolishing the additional pension for new claimants of invalidity benefit.


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