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Independent Tribunal Service (Scotland)

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many persons are employed by the Independent Tribunal Service in Scotland; and what is the current Scottish caseload for (a) disability living allowance and (b) attendance allowance and industrial injury appeal cases.

Mr. Hague: I am informed by the president of the Independent Tribunal Service, his honour judge Bassingthwaighte, that he employs 103 administration and six judicial staff full time in Scotland. In addition, there are 450 tribunal chairmen and members paid on a sessional basis. It is not possible to provide separate caseload figures for disability living allowance and attendance allowance. However, I am informed that at 30 September 1994 the caseload for the two benefits combined was 2,365 and for industrial injuries was 800.


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FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH AFFAIRS

European Parliament

Mr. John Marshall: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the annual rent of the hemicycle building rented by the European Parliament in Brussels; how often the Parliament met there in 1993; and how often it will meet there in 1994.

Mr. David Davis: The European Parliament does not rent the hemicycle, which is part of a building in the Espace Leopold complex. In 1992, the European Parliament signed a contract for a long lease on a complex of three buildings to be constructed, with an option to purchase. The total estimated investment cost under the contract is approximately 1 billion ecu--£775 million,-- before amortisation. The lease on each building is to run 27 years from the date of its handover. For the first 20 years of the lease on each building, Parliament has to pay, in 20 equal annuities and by half-yearly instalments, the amount necessary to amortise the final investment cost over that period. For the final seven years of each lease, the European Parliament will pay 1 ecu per year. The annual budget payment for the building containing the hemicycle is 13.9 mecu-- £10.5 million.

The European Parliament met there three times in 1993, and will meet there four times in 1994.

Mr. John Marshall: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what will be the rental of the new building being rented in Strasbourg by the European Parliament.

Mr. David Davis: The European Parliament signed a contract with the city of Strasbourg authorities on 31 March 1994 for a new complex on a similar basis with option to purchase to the Espace Leopold complex in Brussels. The annual cost is estimated at 46 mecu--£34.7 million-- which is planned to start fully in 1998.

Public Information

Mrs. Ewing: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) how much has been spent by his Department in each of the last three years to (a) produce public information in alternative formats for visually impaired people and (b) publicise the availability of accessible information among visually impaired people;

(2) if he will indicate which departmental publications are currently available (a) in Braille, (b) in large print and (c) on tape; and if he will indicate what efforts have been made by his Department to inform visually impaired people about the availability of publications in alternative formats to normal print.

Mr. Baldry: Considerable efforts are directed to making travel advice and other information available to the public on the telephone. It is not possible separately to identify the cost of those services specifically targeted at visually impaired people.

Cyprus

Mr. John D. Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is the latest estimate of the number of non- Cypriots resident in (a) the Greek southern sector of Cyprus and (b) the Turkish northern sector of Cyprus.


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Mr. David Davis: The latest figures supplied by the Statistics Office of the Republic of Cyprus show the non-Cypriot population of the Government-controlled area to be 21,500. There are no reliable figures available for the number of non-Cypriots resident in the northern part of Cyprus.

Mr. John D. Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if the United Kingdom is still a guarantor power for the Republic of Cyprus.

Mr. David Davis: Yes.

Russia

Mr. Mans: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what information he has concerning defence industrial production in Russia; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Douglas Hogg: Russian defence industrial production has fallen sharply in recent years. We estimate that production of light armoured fighting vehicles dropped from some 4,500 in 1989 to 300 in 1993. Production of tanks is estimated to have dropped from 1,700 in 1989 to 200 last year; of fighters and bombers from 525 to 110; and of missiles from 130 to 40. I have placed a more detailed breakdown, with figures for the intervening years, in the Library.

NATIONAL HERITAGE

Sports Council (Lottery Funds)

Ms Mowlam: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will make it his policy that the distribution of lottery funds by the new United Kingdom Sports Council will not be limited to applications which promote the pursuit of excellence.

Mr. Sproat: We have proposed that the new English Sports Council will target its grant-in-aid more effectively in direct support to the governing bodies of sport and on services in support of sporting excellence. The purposes, on or connected with sport, to which the present Great Britain Sports Council, and, in time, its English successor, may apply national lottery funds under the National Lottery Act 1993 are unaffected by these proposals. We do not propose that the United Kingdom Sports Council should be national lottery distributor but it will offer expert advice on applications of United Kingdom importance.

Sport (Participation)

Ms Mowlam: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage whether he now expects local authorities to promote mass participation in sport.

Mr. Sproat: I would expect local authorities to continue to encourage sporting and recreational opportunities for the public at large as they always have done.

Ms Mowlam: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what extra resources will be allocated to local authorities to enable them to develop alternative mechanisms following the disbandment of the regional councils for sport and recreation.


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Mr. Sproat: Our proposal is that the present formal linkage between the regional councils for sport and recreation and the regional offices of the Sports Council should cease and we shall no longer make appointments to the regional councils. Local authorities will want to decide for the future, with other regional interests, how to develop and deliver wider regional leisure strategies and how any such future machinery should be funded.

Parliamentary Questions

Mr. Hanson: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many times during the 1993 94 Session information requested in parliamentary questions has been refused on the grounds of commercial confidentiality.

Mr. Dorrell: My Department has declined to answer three parliamentary questions during the 1993 94 session on the ground of commercial confidentiality.

Tourism

Ms. Mowlam: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what initiatives the English tourist board has planned on sustainable tourism; and how many of these are likely to be implemented.

Mr. Dorrell: The English tourist board participates in various on- going local visitor management initiatives in different types of location across the country. Many of these received pump-priming funding from the English tourist board and are continuing with the support of local funding partners. One example of these is the Wiltshire project which seeks to spread the economic benefits of tourism across the county more evenly and ease pressure on locations like Avebury and Stonehenge. The new visitor opportunities in Wiltshire will be tailored to its special landscape and character. In addition the English tourist board regularly meets and collaborates with bodies such as Countryside Commission and the Rural Development Commission. It has supported the production of a range of publications designed to encourage good environmental practice and policies within the tourism industry. The English tourist board was one of the sponsors of the document, "Getting it Right: a guide to visitor management in historic towns", published earlier this year by the English Historic Towns Forum.

Public Information

Mrs. Ewing: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage (1) how much has been spent by his Department in each of the last three years to (a) produce public information in alternative formats for visually impaired people and (b) publicise the availability of accessible information among visually impaired people;

(2) which departmental publications are currently available (a) in Braille, (b) in large print and (c) on tape; and what efforts have been made by his Department to inform visually impaired people about the availability of publications in alternative formats to normal print.

Mr. Sproat: The Department of National Heritage keeps under review the need to make information available to blind and partially sighted people.

In 1992, the Department made available Braille copies of the popular version of the BBC consultation document issued by the Department. This was produced free of charge in response to inquiries.


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No publications are currently available in Braille, large type or tape.

Cross-media Ownership

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage, pursuant to his predecessor's answer of 18 July, Official Report, column 24, when he hopes to announce the outcome of the review of the rules covering cross-media ownership of the press, including any legislative implications.

Mr. Dorrell [holding answer 17 October 1994]: An announcement about the outcome will be made once the Government have determined the best way forward.

PRIME MINISTER

Engagements

Sir Peter Tapsell: To ask the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Tuesday 18 October.

Mr. Harry Greenway: To ask the Prime Minister if he will list his official engagements for Tuesday 18 October.

The Prime Minister: This morning I had meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. In addition to my duties in the House I shall be having further meetings later today.

EMPLOYMENT

Mining Closures

Mr. William O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on measures that his Department is taking to offer job opportunities to those areas where there have been mining closures.

Mr. Paice: The Department has made available £75 million and introduced a range of employment measures to help people in areas affected by pit closures. Over 40,000 people have been helped by the Employment Service and over 12,000 have started on special training and enterprise council programmes.

Apprenticeship Scheme

Mr. Simon Coombs: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on progress in the introduction of the new apprenticeship scheme.

Mr. Paice: Excellent progress is being made. Seventeen prototypes have been approved and 627 young people have started toward the expected number of 1,850.

Council of Employment Ministers

Mr. Foulkes: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what issues were discussed at the last meeting of the Council of Employment Ministers.

Mr. Portillo: The United Kingdom resisted a proposal to impose compulsory paternity leave on employers; and ensured that the works councils directive will not apply to companies in Britain, thus leaving them free to determine what system of consultation best suits their circumstances.


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Women

Mr. Harry Greenway: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many (a) mothers and (b) other women are now in work; what were the figures 10 and 20 years ago; and if he will make a statement.

Miss Widdecombe: The spring 1994 labour force survey shows the 4 million mothers and 6.8 million other women of working age with dependent children are in employment. In spring 1984 the equivalent figures were 3.1 million and 6.1 million respectively. The participation of women in the labour force in the United Kingdom is the highest of any major EU country.

Wages Councils

21. Ms Corston: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what estimate he has made of the effect on earnings of the abolition of wages councils.

Mr. Oppenheim: I refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave earlier today to the hon. Member for Pendle (Mr. Prentice).

Lone Mothers

22. Mrs. Mahon: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what percentage of lone mothers with dependent children were in work in 1979; and what percentage are currently in work.

Miss Widdecombe: In spring 1981, the earliest date available, the labour force survey showed that 45 per cent. of lone mothers of working age with dependent children were in employment. The current figure, for spring 1994, is 39 per cent. During the period 1981 1994 the numbers of lone mothers in employment increased from 350,000 to 440,000.

Age Discrimination

23. Mr. Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if the Government will introduce legislation to deal with age discrimination in employment.

Miss Widdecombe: The Government have no intention of introducing legislation on age discrimination; it would be ineffective as it has been in other countries and would increase the burdens on business. The Government firmly believe that the way forward is through persuasion.


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Labour Statistics

24. Sir Thomas Arnold: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what are the latest employment figures; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Paice: The summer 1994 labour force survey shows just over 25 million people in employment in Great Britain. The highest proportion of any major European Union country.

Minimum Wage

25. Mr. Dunn: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what was the nature and level of representations he has received from opposition parties on the implications of a minimum wage policy; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Oppenheim: The Government are well aware that if the policies of the opposition parties on minimum wages were ever implemented they would destroy many thousands of jobs.

Trade Union Legislation

26. Mr. Jacques Arnold: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what representations he has received from individual trade unionists arguing for the repeal of all trade union legislation introduced since 1979.

Mr. Oppenheim: None.

Long-term Unemployment

27. Mr. Barry Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is his estimate of the number of long-term unemployed.

Mr. Oppenheim: In July 1994 there were 1,004,271 claimants unemployed for over one year; down 41,300 since April. These figures are on the unadjusted basis.

Government Policy

28. Mr. Mackinlay: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what is the Government's policy in respect of full employment.

Mr. Portillo: The Government pursue policies designed to achieve high levels of employment and low inflation.


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Associated Octel

29. Mr. Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will make a statement on the Health and Safety Executive report on the fire at Associated Octel on 1 February.

Mr. Oppenheim: The Health and Safety Executive has completed its investigation and on 6 September announced its decision to prosecute Associated Octel under sections 2(1) and 3(1) of the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act 1974. HSE will publish a report of its findings, once legal proceedings have been completed.

Nuclear Safety

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what assessment he has made for the work of the Health and Safety Executive on safety in nuclear power stations.

Mr. Oppenheim: None, as general matters of nuclear safety are the responsibility of my right hon. Friend, the President of the Board of Trade.

However, the Department does have responsibility for the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR85). An analysis of data collected under these regulations was published by the Health and Safety Executive in October 1993. Over the period 1986 1991 it showed a 50 per cent. reduction in the average occupational exposure of workers to radiation at nuclear power stations.

Scottish Cricket Clubs

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many work permit applications were granted and how many were rejected in respect of the employment by Scottish cricket clubs over the past seven years; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Oppenheim: Information about the number of work permits applications granted and rejected for employment by Scottish cricket clubs is not available.

Labour Costs

Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what evidence he has regarding the link between non-wage labour costs and job creation.

Mr. Portillo: In Britain the Government are careful not to impose heavy costs on business. The United Kingdom has a higher proportion of its people in work than any other major European Union country and Britain has attracted one-third of all inward investment in the European Union.

SCOTLAND

Police Service

Sir David Steel: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many inquiries have been made into the police service's operation and structure in Scotland since 1990; and at what cost.

Mr. Lang: The inquiry into police responsibilities and rewards, which reported in June 1993, included rank structure within its terms of reference. The Scottish Office contributed £97,000 to the cost of the inquiry. The force structure of the Scottish police service was considered as


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part of the consultation exercise which invited views on the future shape of local government. The service is also under continual review by H. M. inspectorate of constabulary.

Trainee Doctors

Mr. Morgan: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland from what central source funding is made available for flexible training schemes for trainee doctors wishing to pursue a career in general practice; how many places each year are made available on such schemes; how many who have completed their pre-registration year and have been selected for general practice training are on a waiting list; what proportion of these are women; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: Funding is supplied by the NHS management executive in Scotland for vocational training in general practice, including flexible training. The number of places available for flexible training is not fixed. Doctors wishing to train on a flexible basis should register with their postgraduate dean or director. There is no waiting list of doctors selected for vocational training. The management executive encourages NHS employers to offer flexible training to doctors and dentists who have well-founded reasons for working on a part-time or other flexible basis.

Death Certificates

Mr. Foulkes: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many death certificates in 1993 had (a) hypothermia, (b) pneumonia or (c) other cold-related illnesses as one of the contributory causes of death; and what were the figures for each of the four previous years in each case.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The figures requested for hypothermia and pneumonia are given in the table.

Many diseases which contribute to mortality are related in some way to cold conditions. There is no generally accepted list of such conditions. It is not possible therefore to give a meaningful answer to part (c) of the question.

Deaths with any mention of hypothermia or pneumonia on the death certificate, 1989 1993.


                    |Hypothermia (ICD                                           

                    |778.3, 780.8, 780.9                                        

                    |E901.0,                                                    

                    |E901.8 and E901.9) |Pneumonia (ICD                         

                                        |480-486)                               

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1989                |152                |14,377                                 

1990                |137                |12,901                                 

1991                |101                |12,291                                 

1992                |117                |12,050                                 

1993                |141                |13,457                                 

Prisoners

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland on how many occasions since 1 January prisoners have been held (a) two to a cell designed for one and (b) three to a cell designed for one; and if he will list those prisons which experienced these measures.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The subject of the question relates to matters undertaken by the Scottish Prison Service. I have asked its chief executive, Mr. E. W. Frizzell, to arrange for a reply to be given.


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Letter from E. W. Frizzell to Dr. Norman Godman, dated 18 October 1994:

Lord James Douglas Hamilton has asked me to reply to your question about the number of occasions on which double and triple occupancy of cells designed for one occurred.

Occupancy of single cells by more than one prisoner can arise due to factors other than high prisoner numbers, for example to allow refurbishment to improve prisoner accommodation (including the


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installation of in-cell toilets and electrical power). In some instances single cells are in double occupancy at the request of prisoners themselves who for their own reasons prefer to share. During the period from 1 January to 31 August, 12 (out of the total of 21) Scottish prison establishments experienced a degree of doubling up of prisoners, and in the case of four establishments, certain periods of triple occupancy occurred. The table attached lists the establishments and details the average periods involved in each case.


Establishments where multiple occupancy of cells occurred                                                                     

                                     Double occupancy                    Triple occupancy                                     

                                                      |Period (ie months                  |Period (ie months                  

                                                      |unless                             |unless                             

                  |Design capacity  |Nos. of cells    |otherwise stated)|Nos. of cells    |otherwise stated)                  

                                    |involved                           |involved                                             

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HMP Aberdeen      |142              |45               |7                |-                |-                                  

HMP Barlinnie     |939              |247              |8                |-                |-                                  

HMP Cornton Vale  |213              |6                |8                |9                |1                                  

HMP Dumfries      |139              |11               |6                |-                |-                                  

HMP Edinburgh     |508              |153              |8                |5                |8                                  

HMP Friarton      |56               |24               |8                |-                |-                                  

HMYOI Glenochil   |175              |9                |13 days          |-                |-                                  

HMP Greenock      |172              |75               |8                |2                |2 days                             

HMP Inverness     |79               |54               |8                |-                |-                                  

HMP Longriggend   |177              |36               |3                |-                |-                                  

HMP Perth         |426              |60               |8                |10               |3                                  

HMYOI Polmont     |414              |30               |8                |-                |-                                  


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Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what was the average cost per month of keeping someone in prison in 1993 94.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The subject of the question relates to matters undertaken by the Scottish Prison Service. I have asked its chief executive, Mr. E. W. Frizzell to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from E. W. Frizzell to Dr. Norman A. Godman, dated 18 October 1994:

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton has asked me to reply to your question about the average cost per month of keeping someone in prison in 1993 94.

The cost of maintaining an individual at Her Majesty's prisons in Scotland in 1993 94, calculated as total net expenditure (excluding capital) divided by daily average prisoner numbers, was £2,138 per month.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland (1) if he will give a breakdown by age of (a) all female prisoners and (b) all male prisoners at the latest available date;

(2) how many (a) female and (b) male fine defaulters were received into prisons in each of the past four years.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The subject of these questions relate to matters undertaken by the Scottish Prison Service. I have asked its chief executive, Mr. E. W. Frizzell to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from E. W. Frizzell to Dr. Norman A. Godman, dated 18 October 1994:

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton has asked me to reply to your Questions about the breakdown by age and sex of the current prison population and about the number of female and male fine defaulters received into prisons in the last four years.

Table 1 shows the breakdown of the present prison population. Young offenders are generally aged under 21, but a small number may be aged 21 or 22. No further disaggregation is available since details of exact age are collected only on the statistical returns relating to receptions.


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