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Replica Firearms

Mr. Corbyn: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what is the total number of replica firearms imported, and from which country, for each year since 1992.

Mr. Ian Taylor [holding answer 26 October 1994]: The information requested is not available, as replica firearms are not an identifiable commodity within the standard international trade classification.

Firearms

Mr. Corbyn: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what is the total number of firearms imported in the past year; and from which country they came.

Mr. Ian Taylor [holding answer 26 October 1994]: The information is not available, for reasons of commercial confidentiality.

Bus Industry

Mr. Betts: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what has been the number of buses (a) exported from and (b) imported into Great Britain and their value in real terms for each year since 1979.

Mr. Charles Wardle [holding answer 25 October 1994]: The annual United Kingdom trade in buses since 1979 is given in the table. The value in real terms is not available.


United Kingdom Trade in Buses                                                                         

                 |Exports         |Value £ million |Imports         |Value £ million                  

Year             |Numbers         |(current prices)|Number          |(current prices)                 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1979             |1,122           |9.5             |491             |7.8                              

1980             |673             |8.3             |417             |6.0                              

1981             |1,433           |19.7            |701             |12.9                             

1982             |2,446           |8.2             |1,041           |31.0                             

1983             |5,973           |17.4            |1,616           |46.2                             

1984             |6,654           |12.5            |1,301           |49.4                             

1985             |7,912           |17.4            |1,174           |36.8                             

1986             |5,475           |14.0            |1,493           |35.4                             

1987             |5,518           |13.4            |1,087           |38.3                             

1988             |724             |11.0            |1,045           |58.0                             

1989             |698             |11.8            |1,056           |65.7                             

1990             |2,142           |21.5            |665             |46.2                             

1991             |1,462           |26.1            |544             |30.2                             

1992             |786             |19.1            |713             |47.2                             

1993<1>          |1,222           |23.7            |905             |57.4                             

Note: <1> Provisional.                                                                                

Sources:                                                                                              

SMMT World Automotive Statistics except for 1981 and 1993. Department of Trade Overseas Trade         

Statistics for 1981. CSO Business Monitors MM 20 and MQ20 for 1993.                                   

Mr. Betts: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what has been (a) the value in real terms and (b) the


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numbers of vehicles produced by the British bus-building industry in each year since 1979.

Mr. Charles Wardle [holding answer 25 October 1994]: The numbers of buses produced by the British bus-building industry, annually in the United Kingdom since 1979, are given in the table. The value in real terms is not available.


Production of buses   

in the United Kingdom 

Year    |Number       

----------------------

1979    |25,531       

1980    |21,572       

1981    |12,444       

1982    |13,107       

1983<1> |15,616       

1984    |16,499       

1985    |16,027       

1986    |12,340       

1987    |13,995       

1988<1> |16,500       

1989    |14,858       

1990    |12,987       

1991    |9,837        

1992    |8,517        

1993    |7,639        

<1> 53 weeks.         

Source                

SMMT                  

Lord Archer of Weston-Super-Mare

Mr. Harvey: To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will list the persons from whom he received advice before deciding to take no further action regarding the report into alleged insider dealing involving Lord Archer of Weston-super-Mare.

Mr. Heseltine: It is not my Department's practice to disclose details of individuals from whom legal advice is obtained. Both the advice and its source is regarded as confidential.

Mr. Harvey: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what has been the (a) budgeted and (b) total cost of the inquiry into the allegations of insider trading involving Lord Archer of Weston-super-Mare.

Mr. Heseltine: The total cost--including inspectors' fees, disbursements and VAT--of the investigation into alleged insider dealing in the shares of Anglia Television Group plc was £213,767. Individual inquiries are not subject to separate budgets.

NORTHERN IRELAND

Performance-related Pay

Mr. Hain: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will give figures based on current performance for the number of health service staff she expects will see earnings (a) fall and (b) rise as a result of the introduction of relating pay to performance.

Mr. Moss: The proposals made to staff sides and the professionals who represent the groups covered by national health service review bodies, and included in pay bodies of non-review body groups, would strengthen the links between rewards and performance of the local organisations. Such schemes would be locally determined


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and depend on the achievement of local objectives for the delivery of high-quality services.

Bill of Rights

Mr. Allen: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what steps he is taking towards the introduction of a Bill of Rights for Northern Ireland; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Ancram: The Government have long recognised that the protection of human rights will be considered in the context of talks necessary to create a comprehensive political settlement. It would be wrong to pre-empt the outcome of those talks.

Public Appointments

Dr. Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many public appointments (a) he is responsible for making and (b) require his approval including those not listed in "Public Bodies"; and if he will give this figure in terms of (i) appointments to executive bodies, (ii) appointments to advisory bodies and (iii) other appointments.

Sir John Wheeler: My right hon. and learned Friend approves the following public appointments, which are identified in "Public Bodies 1993":

Executive Bodies--205.

Advisory Bodies--79.

Others--63.

Executive and advisory--1.

The public appointments not included in "Public Bodies 1993" that the Secretary of State is personally responsible for approving are as follows:Executive Bodies--22.Advisory Bodies--5.Others--0.

With regard to the Secretary of State's approval for those appointments not listed in "Public Bodies", I would refer the hon. Member to the reply I gave him on 8 March, Official Report, column 141. In addition to those bodies, the Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Agency came into operation on 1 April 1994. The Secretary of State is responsible for the approval of the membership, comprising the chairman and one non-executive director, who are then appointed by the head of the Department of Health and Social Services.

De Lorean

Mr. Nicholas Winterton: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how much money was paid in total in grants to the De Lorean motor car company; how much of that money has to date been returned; what has been the cost of the legal proceedings to obtain that return; how many workers in Northern Ireland are currently employed by the company; and what specific changes in policy and procedure have now been implemented by his Department to ensure there is no repetition of the De Lorean affair.

Mr. Ancram [holding answer 24 October 1994]: De Lorean Motor Cars Ltd. received Government assistance amounting to some £77.3 million, including £17.76 million in preference share capital. The company is now in receivership and liquidation and has no employees. The Department of Economic Development has received in excess of £10 million from the receivership and some £5.9 million from other sources. No costs were incurred by the Government on legal proceedings to obtain these sums.


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The operating arrangements and investment criteria of the Industrial Development Board were carefully worked out following a comprehensive assessment of the De Lorean case to ensure that such a project would not be supported in future. Those arrangements were reviewed following the 25th report of the Public Accounts Committee and are fully compatible with the recommendations in paragraphs 91 to 98 of that report.

As a separate issue, the Government are pursuing an action for damages against Arthur Anderson and Company in relation to its role as auditors of De Lorean Motor Cars Ltd.

Tourist Boards

Mr. Milburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if he will publish an up-to-date list of all the (a) chairs and (b) non- executive directors of each tourist board, indicating the gender and occupation of each individual.

Mr. Ancram [holding answer 24 October 1994]: The Northern Ireland tourist board has a nine-member board consisting of a chairman and eight members.


Name                             |Gender                          |Occupation                                                       

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hon.Hugh O'Neill (Chairman)      |Male                            |Businessman                                                      

Brian Adgey                      |Male                            |Business Consultant                                              

Roy Bailie                       |Male                            |Company Chairman                                                 

Gerry Burns                      |Male                            |Local Government Chief Executive                                 

Annie Courtney                   |Female                          |Health Promotion Co-ordinator                                    

Tony Hopkins                     |Male                            |Managing Partner                                                 

Alan Lambert                     |Male                            |Director                                                         

Willian McGinnis                 |Male                            |Managing Director                                                

Dr. Mary Peters                  |Female                          |Company Director                                                 

EDUCATION

Dearing Report

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if she has received Sir Ron Dearing's report on his investigation into awarding procedures in this year's mathematics and science GCSEs; and if she will make a statement.

Mrs. Gillian Shephard: The investigation by the School Curriculum and Assessment Authority is continuing. I have, however, today welcomed interim proposals from Sir Ron Dearing to strengthen and clarify existing arrangements underpinning consistency of grading across GCSE examining groups. These measures include:

Ensuring that the rules for determining grades are clear, consistent and robust.

Improving communications between examining groups.

Producing national sets of candidates' work to help define grade standards in key subjects.

Introducing piloting of any major changes to awarding schemes. These will start to come into effect for the winter 1994 GCSE examinations and will all be in place for examinations from summer 1995 onwards.

I have also agreed that the School Curriculum and Assessment Authority should review with the examining groups the scope for a more co-ordinated approach to


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syllabuses, examinations and awarding in the core subjects from 1998 in the interests of securing consistency of grading. I am placing in the Library of the House my exchange of correspondence with Sir Ron Dearing.

Schools (Emergency Cover)

Sir Cranley Onslow: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what recent discussions she has had with teachers' representatives to enlist their support for the provision of adequate emergency cover in schools for children suffering acute allergic reactions and other life-threatening conditions.

Mr. Forth: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not discussed this issue specifically with the teacher unions recently, but I met my right hon. Friend and members of the Anaphylaxis Campaign, whose representatives included a head teacher, on 27 September. "Consideration" is being given to further appropriate measures to deal with those concerns.

Departmental Post

Mr. Donohoe: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how much her Department has spent on postage, and how many items have been posted by her Department, in each of the last five years.

Mr. Forth: The following figures include the central spend on postage by my Department and our contracted mailing house:


Financial Year |Cost                         

               |£                            

---------------------------------------------

1989-90        |870,558                      

1990-91        |575,951                      

1991-92        |674,372                      

1992-93        |796,161                      

1993-94        |490,906                      

Information is not collected about the occasional dispatches carried out on the Department's behalf by ad hoc mailing contractors. The figures for 1993 94 reflect the fact that the Office for Standards in Education has assumed financial responsibility for its own post bill. Information about the number of items posted is not held centrally.

Special Needs

Mr. Win Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what medical training her Department advises is necessary for escorts of children with special educational needs being transported to and from school.

Mr. Forth: It is for local education authorities to satisfy themselves that appropriate supervision is provided for the transport of children with special educational needs. The Government endorsed a Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents report in 1991 which recommended that escorts should have a knowledge and understanding of the particular disabilities of the children they escort and that they should have received adequate first aid training.

Mr. Win Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what advice her Department has given to local


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education authorities on the transport of children with special educational needs to and from school.

Mr. Forth: Transport arrangements made by local education authorities must enable pupils to travel in reasonable safety and comfort, without undue stress, strain or difficulty such as would prevent the child benefiting from the education provided at the school. Guidance on the management and safety of school transport was included in a circular letter on a range of school transport issues sent to all chief education officers in England in January 1994.

Public Appointments

Dr. Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many public appointments (a) she is responsible for making and (b) require her approval, including those not listed in "Public Bodies"; and if she will give this figure in terms of (i) appointments to executive bodies, (ii) appointments to advisory bodies and (iii) other appointments.

Mr. Boswell: The information requested is given below.


                   |Number of         |Number of                            

                   |appointments the  |appointments that                    

                   |Secretary of State|require approval                     

                   |is                |from the                             

                   |responsible for   |Secretary of State                   

                   |making                                                  

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Executive bodies   |255               |1                                    

Advisory bodies    |19                |-                                    

Other bodies       |87<1>             |1                                    

<1> These figures include eight appointments to the SLC made jointly by the 

Secretaries of State for Education and for Scotland. Further appointments   

can be made at the discretion of the Secretaries of State.                  

The Secretary of State is also empowered to establish education associations and may appoint as many members as she considers appropriate to each association.

Our Children's Education"

Mr. Win Griffiths: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many pensioner households received the publication Our "Children's Education".

Mr. Robin Squire: "Our Children's Education", the updated parents charter, was delivered to every household in England. This means that all pensioner households should have received a copy. I would expect many of them to be interested in the contents, but as taxpayers, grandparents or both.

Stratford School

Mr. Tony Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what are the qualifications of Mrs. Gould of Combe Hay Partnership to become a governor of Stratford school; and what fees she will receive.

Mr. Robin Squire: Mrs. Daphne Gould OBE is the former head teacher of an east London school, with particular experience of Stratford school through her previous services as the Secretary of State's additional governor. Mrs. Gould was a founder member of the National Curriculum Council, and is one of only six honorary fellows of the university of London's institute


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of education. Mrs. Gould will not, of course, receive fees for her duties as a governor. However, the Secretary of State has separately asked her to carry out consultancy work at the school for a period not exceeding 10 days this term, for which she will be remunerated at an appropriate rate.

Clock Adjustment

Mr. Barry Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Education how many man hours were taken up by adjusting the clocks throughout her Department.

Mr. Forth: No record is kept of such estimates.

Higher and Further Education Fees

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what guidelines she has published on the charging of registration fees to home students by higher and further education colleges.

Mr. Boswell: There are no Government guidelines on the charging of registration fees to students.

Budget Allocations

Mr. Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what proportion of her Department's budget in


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the last year for which figures are available was spent on (a) nursery, (b) primary, (c) secondary and (d) higher and further education; and what were the corresponding figures five, 10 and 15 years ago.

Mr. Robin Squire: During this period the Department's responsibilities have changed. It has previously had responsibility for science, arts, libraries and sport. Responsibility for funding some sectors of education has passed from local education authorities to the Department. The table accordingly provides figures for expenditure on the activities in question, as a proportion of expenditure on education by the Department and by English local authorities. The percentage of expenditure on each sector reflects in part demographic trends, and also the recent rapid growth in participation in higher education. The figures are for England only, with the exception of those figures for further and higher education which include spending on mandatory student awards in Wales. Other figures for Wales, and those for Scotland and Northern Ireland, are the responsibilities of my right hon. Friends the Secretaries of State for Wales and for Scotland and my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland.


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Proportion of expenditure on sectors of education as percentage of total local and     

central Government education expenditure                                               

                                |1994-95<1>|1989-90   |1984-85   |1979-80              

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nursery<2>                      |-         |4.2       |2.6       |2.1                  

Primary                         |22.1      |19.5      |19.2      |20.3                 

Secondary<3>                    |23.3      |27        |29.9      |28.2                 

Special schools<4>              |5         |3.5       |3.3       |3                    

Schools capital<5>              |2.2       |4.1       |2.5       |4.3                  

Higher and further education<6> |35.9      |28.5      |30.1      |28.7                 

Other<7>                        |11.5      |13.2      |12.4      |13.4                 

<1>Central Government element of figures based on planned expenditure. Local Authority 

recurrent expenditure is taken from local authority Revenue Account budget returns.    

Schools capital expenditure figures do not allow for Local Authorities' self-financed  

expenditure. The figures in this column are therefore not directly comparable with     

those in other columns, which report outturn expenditure.                              

<2>For 1989-90 only figures include rising fives in primary schools. Figures for       

1994-95 have been included in figures for primary schools, as the figures available do 

not fully disaggregate funding on nursery provision from primary provision.            

<3>Figures include expenditure on assisted places, recurrent expenditure on CTCs and   

music and ballet schools.                                                              

<4>Figures have been shown separately for special schools which often have pupils of   

both primary and secondary age.                                                        

<5>Figures showing the split of capital expenditure between primary and secondary      

schools are not available.                                                             

<6>Figures include expenditure on institutional recurrent and capital funding,         

mandatory student awards (maintenance grants and tuition fees), discretionary awards,  

postgraduate awards, student loans, access funds and adult education. Mandatory awards 

programme also covers Wales. In 1979-80, 1984-85 and 1989-90 the Department was        

responsible through the University Grants Committee and the Universities Funding       

Council for recurrent funding to universities in Scotland and Wales. The figures have  

been adjusted to remove this element of expenditure.                                   

<7>Includes expenditure on administration, research programme, youth service, school   

meals, transport, teachers' centres, child guidance and pupil support.                 


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TRANSPORT

A38

Mr. Hicks: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he intends announcing his Department's preferred routes for the A38 trunk road improvement schemes Saltash-Trerulefoot and

Liskeard-Bodmin; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Watts: This is an operational matter for the Highways Agency. I have asked the chief executive to write to my hon. Friend. Letter from Lawrie Haynes to Mr. Robert Hicks dated 27 October 1994:

I have been asked by the Secretary of State for Transport to reply to your Parliamentary Question about the proposed improvement of the A38 trunk road between Saltash and Trerulefoot and between


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Liskeard and Bodmin. The timing of the preferred route announcements depends upon the progress of the schemes themselves, which is an operational matter for the Highways Agency.

We expect Ministers to be able to announce the preferred routes for both of these schemes in November.

The announcement on the Liskeard to Bodmin scheme has had to await detailed consideration of the A38 Action Group's suggestion that the trunk road should be improved along its existing line through the environmentally sensitive Glynn Valley.

The Saltash to Trerulefoot scheme is also sensitive. Villagers of Landrake have come out in favour of resurrecting the old route, which passes through a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a proposed Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. We have wished to find ways of responding to the concerns that have led them to prefer the old route.

Other aspects of this scheme have also given concern to residents, developers and planners, not least its potential effects on the


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Broadmoor Farm area which the owners and the District Council wish to develop as a business or industrial park. We have wished to ensure that all the concerns that have been expressed as a result of the Public Consultation have been properly understood and taken into account.

Rail Safety

Mr. Wigley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will undertake a survey of the safety of single line railway tracks; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Watts: No.

Non-motorised Transport

Mr. Dowd: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what practical steps he is taking to improve the collection and presentation of data in respect of non-motorised transport modes.

Mr. Norris: The national travel survey is the main source of national data on walking and is a major source of national data on cycling. The survey was conducted five times at irregular intervals between 1965 and 1986, but since 1988 the survey has been expanded to collect data on a continuous basis.

The Department undertakes regular reviews of the need for all types of data but has no plans for further innovations for these modes at present.

Railway Stations

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what provisions are in place or are proposed to require porters at railway stations to assist (a) passengers who have disabilities and (b) those passengers who have children in their charge while at the same time carrying luggage.

Mr. Watts: The provision of porters at stations is a matter for British Rail. I understand that British Rail tries to ensure that stations are staffed according to the expected demand.

The Rail Regulator has a statutory duty to have regard to the interests of persons who are disabled. He requires all station operators to produce and comply with a disabled people's protection policy as a condition of being granted a licence to operate.

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to prohibit the charge made at mainline stations for the use of toilet facilities by passengers or to include the cost of toilet facilities in the cost of a train ticket; and what assessment he has made of the arrangements made for charging for toilet facilities by food outlets at stations.

Mr. Watts: These are matters for station operators.

Train Failure

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will inquire into the cause of a double engine failure during a rail journey between Birmingham and London on 26 April and into whether this train was in a safe condition to carry passengers.

Mr. Watts: Engine failure is an operational matter for the relevant train operating company, which has a statutory responsibility to operate its services safely. The train operating company would be required to report it only if there were personal injury or if other, specific


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circumstances were involved. Engine failure is not a reportable occurrence.

River Thames

Mr. Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what new proposals he has to increase the use of the Thames for commercial, industrial and leisure transport.

Mr. Norris: The River Thames working group has been examining the present transport uses of the Thames, the factors which inhibit the growth of traffic on it, and the potential for developing both freight and passenger traffic. The group will report as soon as possible.

Departmental Post

Mr. Donohoe: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much his Department has spent on postage, and how many items have been posted by his Department in each of the past five years.

Mr. Norris: My Department has spent the following sums on postage:

1991 92

£13.13 million.

1992 93

£12.93 million.

1993 94

£13.27 million.

Separate figures for the Departments for the years 1989 90 and 1990 91 are not available.


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