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Dr. Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will publish a table showing the projected average income for single (a) female and (b) male pensioners between 1994 and the year 2000 and the projected average full-time earnings over the same future period.

Mr. Arbuthnot: The information requested is not available.

Mr. Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will update the information on average pensions at retirement given in his answer of 5 May, Official Report , column 615 ; (2) what estimate he has made of the number of holders of appropriate personal pensions who have rejoined SERPS in each of the past five years; and if he will provide this information by relation to the income of the holder.

Mr. Arbuthnot: I will write to the hon. Member shortly.

Dr. Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many (a) women and (b) men reaching retirement age in the years 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2020 the Government estimates will not qualify for a full basic state pension.

Mr. Arbuthnot: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Crewe and Nantwich (Mrs. Dunwoody) on 21 June at column 146 .

Mr. Denham: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what estimate he has made of (a) the average amount total payment by employer and employees made on behalf of each member of occupational pension schemes and (b) what is the average annual total payment made by employers and employees on behalf of each member of personal pension schemes; and if he will publish a table indicating these average payments by relation to the income band of pension fund members.

Mr. Arbuthnot: In 1992 93 the average total amount paid by employers for each member of an occupational pension scheme was £1, 700. The average total amount paid by each employee was £750. The average annual total payment made by employers on behalf of each employee holding a personal pension was £90. The average annual total payment made by each employee was £670, including minimum contributions.

Information about average payments by relation to the income band of pension fund members is not available.

Sir Peter Emery: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will, as a matter of urgency, seek to


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increase the extra pension payment to those who are over 80 years of age.

Mr. Arbuthnot: I will write to my hon. Friend shortly.

Rent Allowance

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what is his Department's guidance to officials who become aware that housing allowance is not being paid over by the individual concerned to his or her landlord.

Mr. Roger Evans: Where a local authority is made aware that an individual has failed to pay their housing benefit, there is a statutory provision for benefit to be withheld, or for the local authority to commence direct payments to the landlord.

Additionally, there is a mandatory provision for benefit to be paid direct to a landlord where there are eight or more weeks arrears of rent.

Job Seeker's Allowance

Mr. Ron Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate the number of people in Wales who will experience changes in their income if the job seeker's allowance is introduced.

Mr. Roger Evans: I will write to the hon. Member shortly.

Benefits (Abolition)

Mr. Ron Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what estimates his Department have made of the numbers of people in Wales who will be affected by the abolition of income support and unemployment benefit; and, of these, how many will lose their entitlement to benefit after six months, because they have savings or redundancy money or partners in full-time work; how many households will have their income reduced as partners are forced to give up work in order to meet the means test; and how many women will have a change in their status.

Mr. Roger Evans: I will write to the hon. Member shortly.

Severe Disablement Allowance

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if the entitlement conditions for an adult dependency increase of severe disablement allowance will be the same as those for an increase of incapacity benefit from April 1995.

Mr. Hague: Currently the conditions for receiving an adult dependency increase with severe disablement allowance are the same as for increases of invalidity benefit. We plan to introduce regulations shortly bringing them into line with the rules proposed for incapacity benefit. Under these rules, provision will be better targeted. Increases will be available in cases where: the beneficiary has a spouse who is aged 60 or over; the beneficiary has a spouse aged under 60 and dependent children; there is an adult, other than a spouse, who is caring for the beneficiary's dependent children. As now, there will be no payment where the dependent has earnings above a certain level. The earnings rule will be the same as for long-term incapacity benefit. Increases


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will continue to be available from the start of the severe disablement allowance award.

The new rules will apply to people claiming severe disablement allowance on or after 13 April 1995. There will be transitional protection for existing beneficiaries in line with that for transitional awards of long-term incapacity benefit.

Departmental Property

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what properties are owned or leased by his Department for the use of Ministers; what was the total running cost for each property for the latest year available broken down into (a) furniture and fittings, (b) maintenance (c) staffing, including the number of butlers, cooks and housekeepers, (d) food and hospitality and (e) other costs; what is the estimated value of each property; and how many times in the latest year the property was stayed in overnight by a minister.

Mr. Hague: Excluding departmental offices, this Department does not own or lease any properties for the use of Ministers.

Invalidity Benefit

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what plans he has to allow women to receive full invalidity benefit past the age of 60 years.

Mr. Devlin: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security when he expects to pay invalidity benefit at the same rate to men and women between the ages of 60 and 65 years.

Mr. Hague: After state pension age, currently 60 for a woman, 65 for a man, the weekly rate of invalidity benefit is based on a person's retirement pension entitlement. We have no plans to change this at present. It has been the position since invalidity benefit was introduced in 1971, and a feature of the national insurance scheme since July 1948.

There is a case before the European Court of Justice concerning the rate of invalidity benefit payable to women on reaching state pension age. A ruling is not expected before July 1995.

From 13 April 1995, invalidity benefit and sickness benefit will be replaced by incapacity benefit. When a person reaches state pension age payment of incapacity benefit will normally cease as retirement pension is the appropriate benefit.

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will make a statement on the progress of current legal actions in respect of the granting of full invalidity benefit to women past the age of 60 years.

Mr. Hague: The hon. Member is referring to the case of Mrs. Rose Graham, which has been appealed to the Court of Appeal. At a hearing on 18 January 1994, the Court of Appeal decided to refer questions of European law arising in the case of the European Court of Justice. The questions to be referred were agreed by all parties. The court's procedure involves inviting all member states to submit observations on the points at issue. A ruling is not expected before July 1995 at the earliest.

Incapacity Assessment Panel

Mr. Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security, pursuant to his answer of 25 October, Official


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Report , column 564 , on what date the members of the panel on assessment of incapacity were informed that their names would be published only with their agreement.

Mr. Hague: A letter was sent to panel members on 25 August 1994, in which they were invited to contact the Department if they did not agree to their names being published in the report "The medical assessment for Incapacity Benefit".

Spencer Stuart Consultants

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many contracts his Department or Government agencies responsible to his Department have entered into with Spencer Stuart consultants in the last two years.

Mr. Hague: None.

Child Benefit

Mr. Ron Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) how many families in Wales (a) received child benefit and (b) were eligible to receive it at the latest available date; (2) how many children there are in families in receipt of child benefit in Wales; and how many there are in families which are eligible.

Mr. Burt: It is estimated that on 31 December 1993 there were 356, 575 families in Wales receiving child benefit in respect of 642,400 children. Information on numbers eligible for child benefit is not available, but take-up in Great Britain is estimated to be nearly 100 per cent.

FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH AFFAIRS

Rwanda

Mr. Worthington: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what action is being taken by the United Nations to prevent the reformation of a Rwandan Hutu army within refugee camps.

Mr. Baldry: The UN Secretariat is preparing a consolidated report on the security situation in the refugee camps.

The report, which is due shortly, is expected to cover the possibility of separating out the remnants of the army of the former Rwanda Government and to contain options for international action.

Mr. Tony Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what precautions he is taking to ensure that aid being provided to Rwandan refugees in Zaire is not used by those responsible for genocide in Rwanda to re-establish their authority; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Baldry: We maintain a close dialogue with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. She is considering with donor Governments and other United Nations organisations a number of options to improve security in the camps, to help ensure that emergency aid is delivered unimpeded to the refugees in genuine need.


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Turkey

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made recently to (a) the Council of Europe, (b) the European Union, (c) the United Nations and (d) the Committee on Security and Co-operation in Europe, regarding the abuse of human rights by the Government of Turkey.

Mr. Douglas Hogg: We regularly contribute to discussion in international fora on the abuse of human rights in Turkey. The subject was discussed most recently at the CSCE review conference in Budapest.

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has received from the Government of Turkey regarding the presence of Mr. Kani Yilmaz in the United Kingdom; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. David Davis: No formal representations have been received from the Government of Turkey. We understand the Turkish authorities are aware of Mr. Yilmaz's detention.

Mr. Austin -Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he was first informed of the arrival of Mr. Kani Yilmaz in the United Kingdom.

Mr. David Davis: We were informed on 24 October of the arrival of Mr. Kani Yilmaz in the United Kingdom the previous evening.

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what representations he has made regarding the imprisonment and requested execution of elected members of the Turkish Parliament.

Mr. David Davis: We have repeatedly made plain to the Turkish authorities the damage that these arrests have done to Turkey's international reputation. Her Majesty's embassy in Ankara is monitoring carefully the trial which began on 3 August. My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs also raised the issue of human rights in Turkey with the Prime Minister Mrs. Ciller when they met in Istanbul on 14 October.

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what contact his Department had with Mr. Kani Yilmaz on his previous visits to the United Kingdom.

Mr. David Davis: My Department had no contact with Mr. Kani Yilmaz on his previous visits to the United Kingdom.

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what assessment he has made on whether arms supplied to Turkey by the United Kingdom are being used against the civilian population; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. David Davis: Proposed arms sales to Turkey, as to other countries, are considered on a case by case basis and are subject to stringent licensing procedures. Before a licence is granted, a number of considerations are taken into account, including an assessment of the recipient country's human rights record. We do not grant licences for the sale of equipment which we believe is likely to be used for internal repression.

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs when he was first


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informed of the intention of Mr. Kani Yilmaz to enter the United Kingdom on his most recent visit.

Mr. David Davis: We were not informed of the intention of Mr. Kani Yilmaz to enter the United Kingdom on his most recent visit.

Mr. Austin-Walker: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make representations to other NATO countries and to Pakistan to cease the supply of arms to Turkey, with particular reference to bombs; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. David Davis: Turkey is a NATO ally and has legitimate defence requirements. All countries, including the United Kingdom, which are members of the EU, NATO and CSCE are guided by common principles on arms sales. It would not be appropriate for Her Majesty's Government to make representations to other countries to cease the supply of arms to Turkey.

Nuclear Weapons

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he is seeking an agreed EU position on the proposal to submit a resolution to the United Nations General Assembly requesting that the International Court of Justice give its advisory opinion on the legal status of the use and the threat of use of nuclear weapons.

Mr. David Davis: We have consulted EU partners who agreed that a United Nations General Assembly resolution on the subject would be inappropriate while the International Court of Justice was already considering a similar appeal from the World Health assembly.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what decisions have been made in the Council of Ministers in respect of the plan of the non-aligned movement to submit a resolution to the United Nations General Assembly requesting that the International Court of Justice give its advisory opinion on the legal status of the use and the threat of use of nuclear weapons.

Mr. David Davis: The issue has not been discussed in the Council of Ministers.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how he will vote in the United Nations General Assembly on the resolution requesting that the International Court of Justice give its advisory opinion on the legal status of the use and the threat of use of nuclear weapons.

Mr. David Davis: The United Kingdom will vote against any such resolutions.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what co-ordination and contacts have been established between the European Union and NATO in respect of the proposal of the non- aligned movement to submit a resolution at the United Nations General Assembly requesting that the International Court of Justice give its advisory opinion on the legal status of the use and the threat of use of nuclear weapons.

Mr. David Davis: There have been no formal contacts between the European Union and NATO on this issue.

China

Mr. Elletson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement


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about the prospects for an improvement in Sino-British relations (a) pre-1997 and (b) post-1997.

Mr. Goodlad: We aim to intensify our practical co-operation with China on the basis of shared interests both in relation to Hong Kong and more widely. We have put forward a number of proposals to that end and hope that they will provide the basis for an increasingly co-operative long-term relationship.

Departmental Property

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what properties are owned or leased by his Department for the use of Ministers; what was the total running cost for each property for the latest year available broken down into (a) furniture and fittings, (b) maintenance, (c) staffing, including the number of butlers, cooks and housekeepers, (d) food and hospitality and (e) other costs; what is the estimated value of each property; and how many times in the latest year the property was stayed in overnight by a Minister.

Mr. Goodlad: 1 Carlton gardens is leased by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office from the Crown Estate Commissioners. This is for the use of my right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary. It is his official London residence.

The total running costs for 1 Carlton gardens in the financial year 1993 94 were £320,725.

This is broken down as follows:

(a) Furniture and furnishings £13,750

(b) Maintenance:

(i) rent and rates £120,085

(ii) utilities £16,728

(iii) day to day maintenance (including contract up) £38,255 (c) and (d)

(i) no household or catering staff are employed at

1 Carlton gardens. Staff are engaged on an ad hoc basis when official hospitality is provided. Twenty-five functions for a total of 519 guests were held in FY 1993 94. £24,157

(ii) Messagerial and security staff provided by the FCO. £107,750 (e) There were no other running costs.

The value of the property is not known; the freehold is owned by the Crown Estate Commissioners. When in London, my right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary resides at 1 Carlton gardens.

Recruitment

Mr. Chris Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if questions pertinent to the sexuality of potential recruits to his Department are still being asked during recruitment interviews.

Mr. Goodlad: Yes, in the case of recruits to the diplomatic service, so that homosexual officers maybe given suitable advice before bidding for postings to certain countries where homosexual practices might be illegal or socially unacceptable.


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Mr. Chris Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if his Department operates a policy of non- discrimination against homosexuals in recruitment to all sections of the Department.

Mr. Goodlad: Yes.

Mr. Chris Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is his Department's policy towards those members of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office who have now admitted their homosexuality, but who were originally recruited when homosexuality was a bar to recruitment to his Department; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Goodlad: Each case is taken on its merits. Officers who concealed during their vetting process the fact that they were homosexual have come forward without any resulting problems. The Department will continue to be as sympathetic as possible in the circumstances of any such cases in the future.

Burma

Sir Thomas Arnold: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is now Her Majesty's Government's policy towards Burma; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Goodlad: The situation in Burma remains of great concern. Together with our EU partners we suspended all non-humanitarian official aid in 1988 and imposed an arms embargo in 1991. We have made clear that normalisation of our relations will depend on progress in key areas, including human rights and democratic reform.

Iran

Sir Thomas Arnold: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what is now Her Majesty's Government's policy towards Iran; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Douglas Hogg: Government policy on Iran remains as stated in my reply to the hon. Member for Liverpool, Riverside (Mr. Parry) on 25 January 1994, at column 144 45 .

Spencer Stuart Consultants

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs how many contracts his Department or Government agencies responsible to his Department have entered into with Spencer Stuart consultants in the last two years.

Mr. Goodlad: The FCO and ODA can find no record of any contracts with Spencer Stuart in the last two years.

Western Sahara

Mrs. Ewing: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what plans Her Majesty's Government have to expand the scope of operations designed to register Sahrawi voters and ensure that the referendum for self-determination in Western Sahara is carried out in a fair and democratic manner, and is free from either intimidation or manipulation by the Moroccan Government; and if he will make a statement;

(2) what plans Her Majesty's Government have to encourage negotiations between the Polisario and the


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