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Enterprise Zones

Mr. Rooker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what study he has made of the consequences for the infrastructure of neighbouring areas of the initial enterprise zones.

Mr. Curry: The Department's preliminary report, "An Evaluation of the Enterprise Zone Experiment", HMSO 1987, examined a number of linkages between zones and their local areas. A further report, based on the performance of the first round zones, is due for publication early next year.

Council Tax Valuations

Mr. Kenneth Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will seek to amend the council tax valuation orders to allow a reduction in valuations to reflect the current market value of houses affected by blight caused by the announcement of major infrastructure


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projects where the time from the announcement to the payment of compensation, if a decision were taken to proceed, would be more than five years.

Mr. Curry: No.

Humber Estuary

Mr. McNamara: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment (1) for what reasons his Department referred back to the National Rivers Authority its list of areas of high natural dispersion under the urban waste water treatment directive when the Humber estuary was not included upon it; and how many other areas not originally in the National Rivers Authority list were subsequently added after the original list had been submitted to him;

(2) what discussions he or any members of his Department had with Yorkshire Water before the designation of the Humber estuary as a area of high natural dispersion for the purpose of the urban waste water treatment directive;

(3) upon what scientific basis the Humber bridge was chosen as the western end of the high natural dispersion area for the purpose of the urban waste water treatment directive;

(4) upon what environmental impact assessment he made his decision that the Humber estuary was an area of high natural dispersion; (5) what direct consultation his Department and the National Rivers Authority had with the port health authority, the city of Hull, Associated British Ports and the public on both banks of the Humber before designating the estuary as an area of high natural dispersion;

(6) on what date his decision was taken under article 6 of the urban waste water treatment directive that the Humber estuary was an area of high natural dispersion.

Mr. Atkins: In March 1992 the Department published a consultation paper on, among other issues, the criteria and procedures for identifying less sensitive areas, high natural dispersion area--HNDAs, under the Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive. The scientific criteria for identifying HNDAs were published in a second consultation paper in March 1993. These consultation papers were the subject of parliamentary answers and news releases and were placed in the Library of the House. They were sent to the Association of County Councils and the Association of District Councils, among others. Discussions then took place between the National Rivers Authority, the water industry and the Department on the identification of locations meeting the agreed criteria. In July 1993, my hon. Friend, the Member for Suffolk, South (Mr. Yeo) announced the NRA's working list of HNDAs, which included parts of the Humber. Subsequently, in light of advice from the NRA, Ministers concluded, and I announced on 18 May 1994, that the Humber met the criteria for HNDAs.

Discharges into HNDAs must have at least primary treatment--which entails the provision or improvement of treatment at most locations. Comprehensive studies are now being carried out in respect of each HNDA to satisfy the NRA, before it issues any discharge consents, that the discharge will not adversely affect the environment. If the NRA is not satisfied in any particular case, additional treatment will be required. The NRA has a statutory duty


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to publish consent applications and to serve notice of its intention to issue a consent, which allows representations or objections to be made. This duty is not affected by the decision to identify a HNDA.

Listed Buildings

Mr. Kenneth Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if the will list those development projects since 1964 which have involved demolishing or rendering uninhabitable more than 55 listed buildings.

Mr. Curry: The information is not held centrally in this form.

Opencast Mining

Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment if he will list the sites of prospective opencast mining which as yet do not have planning permission but have been included in the reserves listed in the portfolios of the proposed regional coal companies; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Eggar: I have been asked to reply.

On privatisation, regional coal companies will acquire exploration licences, conditional operating licences and options for leases in relation to the coal at portfolios of prospective opencast sites. Prospective opencast sites are at different stages in the process of assembling the interests and rights in and over land and of obtaining planning and other consents, all of which are necessary for the extraction of coal. The grant of planning consents will remain a matter for the planning authorities.

A list of those prospective sites which have, as yet, obtained no planning permission, by Regional Coal Company, has been placed in the Library of the House.

Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment whether any of the reserves of prospective opencast sites which have previously been the subject of unsuccessful planning applications for opencast mining have been included in the portfolios of the proposed regional local companies; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Eggar: I have been asked to reply.

A number of the prospective opencast sites included in the portfolios of the regional coal companies have, in the past, been the subject of unsuccessful planning applications. It has, however, been made abundantly clear throughout the sales process that the grant of any planning consents in the future will remain a matter for the planning authorities.

Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment what calculation his Department has made of the effect on the purchase price of regional coal companies of the inclusion of possible but unapproved sites for opencast coal mining; and what is the difference between the purchase price of possible, but unapproved, sites and that of approved or working sites on a cost per tonnage basis.

Mr. Eggar: I have been asked to reply.

In submitting bids for regional coal companies, prequalifiers for the sale of British Coal's mining activities were assessing the overall value of a portfolio of assets, including prospective opencast mining sites. Bidders were not asked to provide details of their bids on


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a site-by-site basis, and no such assessment has been made by my Department.

TREASURY

Pensions

Mr. Galbraith: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many retired civil servants, retired officers of the armed services and other retired public servants, are receiving pensions of more than 50 per cent. of the current salaries for the jobs from which they retired; and what is the annual cost to the Exchequer.

Sir George Young: This information could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Most public service pension schemes provide a half- pay pension only after a full career, and a one-off lump sum payment of three times the annual pension. However, most public servants do not serve long enough to retire with a half-pay pension.

Taxes (Wales)

Dr. Howells: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what was the total raised from income tax revenue in Wales, (a) in 1990, (b) in 1991, (c) in 1992, (d) in 1993 and (e) in the first six months of 1994;

(2) what was the total raised from income tax revenue in Scotland, (a) in 1990, (b) in 1991, (c) in 1992, (d) in 1993 and (e) in the first six months of 1994.

Sir George Young: Estimates of income tax liabilities for residents of Scotland and Wales are given in the table for 1990 91, 1991 92 and the latest available year for regional estimates, 1992 93. Information on income tax receipts has not been provided for Scotland and Wales as they merely reflect administrative arrangements for the collection of tax.


Estimates of income tax liabilities for  

residents of Scotland and                

Wales                                    

          £ million                      

         |1990-91|1991-92|1992-93        

-----------------------------------------

Scotland |5,070  |5,170  |5,130          

Wales    |2,370  |2,500  |2,330          

IMF

Miss Lestor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the United Kingdom's annual contribution to the International Monetary Fund.

Mr. Nelson: The United Kingdom makes no direct annual contribution to the International Monetary Fund. As a member of the IMF, the United Kingdom maintains a reserves position with the IMF. Of this SDR 700 million --equivalent to £653 million--is unremunerated. The balance is remunerated at the fund's rate of remuneration. At end September 1994, the United Kingdom's reserve position in the IMF stood at SDR 1,354.3 million-- equivalent to £1264 million.

Miss Lestor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the United Kingdom's annual contribution to the IMF's (a) structural adjustment facility, (b) enhanced structural facility and (c) other relevant facilities.


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Mr. Nelson: The only specific IMF facility to which members contribute directly is the enhanced structural adjustment facility--ESAF. Over the life of the facility, the United Kingdom will contribute up to £377 million to the subsidy required for ESAF loans. This amount includes a contribution of the £50 million made earlier this year when the facility was expanded and enlarged. Over time, the United Kingdom will contribute about one-ninth of the subsidy required by ESAF. In 1993-94, a payment of £20 million was made under these arrangements.

Overseas Debt

Miss Lestor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much of the non-concessional debt owed to the international multilateral financial institutions by severely indebted low income countries has been cancelled or converted to International Development Association terms.

Mr. Nelson: Debt owed to the international financial institutions is not cancelled. Under the International Development Association fifth dimension facility, complementary IDA credits, provided in proportion to interest payments due on outstanding IBRD debt, have helped ease the debt service burden of eligible IDA-only countries undertaking internationally supported economic reform programmes. I refer the hon. member to the answer which the Chancellor gave on 19 October to the hon. Member for Blaenau Gwent (Mr. Smith) for details of proposals that he made in Malta this year to help further reduce the burden of debt owed to the IFIs by the poorest, most indebted countries, Official Report , 19 October column 272 .

European Investment

Mr. Campbell-Savours: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer by what amount in pound sterling the facilities of the European Investment bank were increased under terms agreed at the Edinburgh Council.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory: The Edinburgh European Council established a special temporary lending facility, within the European Investment bank, to support capital investment in infrastructure projects. This facility amounted initially to 5 billion ecu or £3,925 million, but was subsequently increased to 7 billion ecu, or £5,495 million by the Copenhagen European Council.

All figures converted at 18/11/94 £/ecu conversion rate (£1 =1.2738 ecu).

Mr. Campbell-Savours: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what are the expenditure implications for the European Union's budget arising out of the activities of the European investment bank and European investment fund.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory: The activities of both the European Investment bank and the European investment fund are financed in each case largely from the resources of the institution concerned and, to this extent, impose no direct costs on the budget of the European union. However:

(i) the European union has subscribed for 600 million ecu, £471 million, worth of shares in the European investment fund, for which 20 per cent. is to be paid in. This sum of 120 million ecu, £94 million will be charged to the EU budget.

(ii) the European union has provided guarantees to the European Investment bank in respect of lending programmes


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which it undertakes in eastern Europe, Asia and Latin America, and in the Mediterranean countries. These guarantees stand on the budget as a contingent liability.

All figures converted at 18/11/94 £/ecu conversion rate (£1 =1.278 ecu).

Mr. Campbell-Savours: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer by what amount in pound sterling the establishment of the European investment fund following the Edinburgh Council is predicted to cost the budget of the European Union.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory: The European Union has subscribed for 600 million ecu, or £471 million, worth of shares in the new European investment fund, of which only 20 per cent is to be paid in to the fund. This sum will be paid from the EU budget, in four equal annual tranches of 30 million ecu, or £23.5 million, over the years 1994 to 1998.

All figures converted at 18 November 1994 £/ecu conversion rate (£1 = 1.2738 ecu).

Mr. Campbell-Savours: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer to what extent the £24 billion expenditure package referred to in the Prime Minister's statement of 14 December 1992, Official Report, column 36, is affected by European Union budgets.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory: The package referred to by my right hon. Friend the Prime Minister is not affected by European Union budgets.

Mr. Spearing: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will publish any variation or extension of the text of the presidential communique of the December 1992 European Council in Edinburgh in respect of the revised arrangements for financing the European Community as now contained in the draft Council decision 9298/93.

Mr Heathcoat-Amory: Draft Council decision 9298/93 was superseded by Council decision 94/728/EC, Euratom of 31 October 1994--the "own resources decision".

The arrangements for Community own resources established by the new own resources decision do not differ in any material respect from those agreed by the Edinburgh European Council.

EC Budget

Mr. Matthew Banks: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will update the figures in table 11.1 of


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Cm. 2517 to take account of latest information; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Kenneth Clarke: The information in the accompanying table reflects the latest forecast and is consistent with the information which I will publish in next week's Financial Statement and Budget Report.

The pattern of our net contributions to the EC budget is obscured by considerable fluctuations from one year to the next. These are caused by adjustments to our payments in previous years as later information become available, differences in the level and timing of receipts, and movements in the size of our abatement. These effects are increased because we use a different financial year from the Community. Our estimate of the underlying level of the net contribution--that is, what we think the net contribution is when the various irregularities are stripped out--is as follows:


Estimate of underlying public 

sector net contribution to    

the EC Budget                 

          |£ million          

------------------------------

1988      |1,500              

1989      |1,700              

1990      |1,900              

1991      |2,100              

1992      |2,200              

1993      |2,400              

1994      |2,500              

1995      |2,700              

1996      |3,100              

1997      |3,300              

1998      |3,500              

1999      |3,550              

Of the increase of £850 million between 1995 and 1999, some £600 million results from the effects of Community gross national product and inflation within the present own resources ceiling which is set at 1.20 per cent. of Community GNP. The remaining £250 million is a consequence of the agreement at the Edinburgh European Council to increase the own resources ceiling from 1.20 per cent. to 1.27 per cent. by 1999.

These figures look large because they are presented in cash terms, for consistency with the rest of our public expenditure arithmetic. But the real scale of the Edinburgh settlement can be seen in the fact that it increased the own resources ceiling over seven years by 7/10,000ths of Community gross national product.


United Kingdom Contributions to and Receipts from the European Community Budget                                       

Cash Plans         £ millions                                                                                         

                  |1989-90  |1990-91  |1991-92  |1992-93  |1993-94  |estimated|1995-96  |1996-97  |1997-98            

                                                                    |1994-95                                          

                            |outturn  |outturn  |outturn  |outturn  |outturn  |outturn  |plans    |plans              

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gross payments    |5,804    |6,411    |6,129    |6,970    |8,407    |8,308    |9,943    |9,910    |10,552             

                                                                                                                      

Public sector                                                                                                         

receipts          |-2,035   |-2,388   |-2,757   |-2,810   |-3,864   |-3,963   |-4,293   |-4,441   |-4,526             

                                                                                                                      

United Kingdom                                                                                                        

abatement         |-1,317   |-1,838   |-2,428   |-1,993   |-2,350   |-1,899   |-2,256   |-2,108                       

                                                                                                                      

Net public sector                                                                                                     

contributions to                                                                                                      

the European                                                                                                          

Community                                                                                                             

budget            |2,452    |2,18     |943      |2,167    |2,192    |2,446    |3,394    |3,361    |3,282              

For domestic public expenditure planning purposes, part of the United Kingdom's contribution to the Community budget  

is attributed to the overseas aid programme. The net contribution to the EC budget when adjusted for this element,    

our payments to the European Investment bank and our receipts from the European Coal and Steel Community form the     

United Kingdom's net payments to EC institutions, the latest estimates for which are: 1994-95 £2,043 million, 1995-96 

£2,821 million, 1996-97 £2,765 million and 1997-98 £2,639 million.                                                    

EC Expenditure

Sir Teddy Taylor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will raise with the EC Commission its statement on page 13 of the draft budget for 1995 on the intention of the EC to exceed the legal limits of agricultural spending by accountancy devices.

Mr. Heathcoat-Amory [holding answer 21 November 1994]: The agricultural guideline can be increased or exceeded only with unanimity in the Council. The Government have made it clear that they see no case for agreeing to a breach of or increase in the guideline for 1995, and that this option is therefore not available to the Council.

It is too early to tell whether spending in 1995 would, in the absence of further measures to control it, exceed the guideline. An approach to the Commission would therefore be premature.

Stamp Duty Office, Cardiff

Mr. Morgan: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what consultations he has had in relation to the decision to close the Cardiff stamp duty office, located at Companies house, Crown way, Maindy, Cardiff; what representations he has received in relation to the closure prior to and since the announcement; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Nelson [holding answer 22 November 1994]: The decision to close the Cardiff stamp office was taken by the Inland Revenue on operational grounds. The closure is one of several changes taking place in the interests of making the stamp office as a whole more efficient. The stamp office is consulting the trade unions about redeployment of the Cardiff stamp office staff as the aim is to offer all staff alternative positions with the Inland Revenue. To date, I have received no representations about the closure.

Company Cars

Mr. Tyler: To ask Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will make it his policy to further modify the tax rules in relation to company cars, to remove the incentives for environmentally damaging behaviour.

Sir George Young [holding answer 22 November 1994]: As with all tax issues, the Chancellor makes his decisions in the Budget. I cannot therefore comment further at this stage.


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Debtor Countries

Miss Lestor: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what is the British Government's policy on providing direct contributions to debtor countries to assist in the settlement of arrears or debt-service to the IFIs.

Mr. Baldry: I have been asked to reply.

The United Kingdom provides programme aid in support of economic reform programmes agreed with the IMF and World bank as part of a collective donor effort to help finance the country's overall external financing requirements including debt service commitments. Exceptionally, at the request of the Zambian Government, we have agreed that our programme aid for 1994 95 may be used to reimburse the government for some of its debt service commitments to the international financial institutions. This is in the context of an agreed overall government budget which provides for increased social services provision.

HOME DEPARTMENT

European Economic Area Nationals

Dr. Howells: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many nationals of EEA countries have been required to leave the United Kingdom on the basis of direct referrals from the Benefits Agency since the Income Support (General) Regulations were amended in April 1993; and, how many of these EEA nationals are lone parents.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: Between April 1993 and December 1993, 183 European Community nationals, whose cases were referred by the Benefits Agency, were advised that because they were not economically active and had become a burden on public funds the Secretary of State was not satisfied that they were exercising a right of residence under European Community law and they should accordingly make arrangements to leave the United Kingdom. Since January 1994, when EC rights of residence were extended to all European economic area nationals, 393 EEA nationals have been advised in similar terms up to the end of October 1994. Information is not available as to whether any of these cases involved lone parents.

Police (Truncheons)

Sir Ivan Lawrence: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of


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alternatives to the traditional truncheon for use by the police.

Mr. Howard: Home Office research published today, into assaults on police officers and police trials of the expandable side-handled baton, confirms that there is a need for better ways of restraining violent suspects, that the expandable side-handled baton is very good for this purpose, and that a three-piece expandable baton is acceptable to many officers. I have already given my support to police forces that are using the expandable side-handled baton. In the light of these reports and of further scientific research, I am content for chief officers, if they wish, to introduce the rigid version of that baton. I am ensuring that chief officers have available good, scientifically based information about the different characteristics of different batons as a basis for their choice. I have also, as police authority for the Metropolitan police, agreed that they may have 24 inch and 26 inch batons in addition to the 22 inch ones already being issued. This follows satisfactory scientific evaluation of the new batons.

Emergency Planning

Mr. Rowe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what arrangements are planned to ensure effective co-ordination for emergency planning between any new unitary authorities established within an existing county council boundary in England.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: Local authorities in England and Wales, together with the principal associations representing them, have been consulted on the delivery and co-ordination of emergency planning following the outcome of the local government review. We are considering their responses and hope to make an announcement before the end of this year.

Asylum Seekers

Mrs. Roche: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many asylum seekers have been detained under the Immigration Act 1971 since (a) 26 July 1993 and (b) 1 January;

(2) if he will provide a breakdown of the number of asylum seekers currently held in detention by (a) nationality, (b) gender, (c) length of detention, (d) place of detention and (e) immigration status at the time of application.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: At 18 November 1994, a total of 654 people who had sought asylum were detained. This figure includes people awaiting the setting of directions for removal following refusal of the application, as well as those whose application was under consideration or subject to appeal. Of this figure, 167 had been in detention less than one month, 125 between one and two months, 233 between two and six months and 129 had been in detention longer than six months.

Information on the gender, immigration status, nationality and location of detention is given in tables A, B and C. Information on the numbers who have been detained since 26 July 1993 and 1 January is not available.


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Table A Number of people detained on 18 November 1994, who                                       

had sought asylum, by immigration status and gender                                              

Immigration Status   |Male              |Female            |Total                                

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Port case            |281               |24                |305                                  

Illegal entrant case |276               |8                 |284                                  

Deportation case     |55                |10                |65                                   

                                                                                                 

Total                |612               |42                |654                                  


Table B Number of people detained as at 18 November  

1994 who                                             

had sought asylum, by nationality                    

                     |Number detained                

-----------------------------------------------------

Afghanistan          |1                              

Albania              |6                              

Algeria              |74                             

Angola               |11                             

Bangladesh           |20                             

Bulgaria             |1                              

Cameroon             |2                              

Chad                 |1                              

China                |10                             

Colombia             |8                              

Cyprus (TRNC)        |19                             

Dominica             |1                              

Egypt                |3                              

Eritrea              |1                              

Estonia              |1                              

Ethiopia             |5                              

Gambia               |3                              

Ghana                |56                             

Hong Kong            |1                              

India                |87                             

Iran                 |4                              

Iraq                 |5                              

Israel               |2                              

Ivory Coast          |10                             

Jamaica              |5                              

Kenya                |6                              

Lebanon              |2                              

Liberia              |5                              

Libya                |6                              

Malawi               |1                              

Malaysia             |1                              

Mauritius            |5                              

Morocco              |7                              

Mozambique           |1                              

Nigeria              |117                            

Pakistan             |28                             

Peru                 |1                              

Philippines          |2                              

Romanian             |5                              

Russia               |2                              

Rwanda               |1                              

Sierra Leone         |13                             

Slovenia             |1                              

South Africa         |6                              

Sri Lanka            |13                             

Sudan                |3                              

Tanzania             |1                              

Trinidad and Tobago  |1                              

Tunisia              |3                              

Turkey               |49                             

Uganda               |5                              

Former Yugoslavia    |6                              

Zaire                |22                             

Zimbabwe             |1                              

                                                     

Nationality doubtful |3                              

                                                     

Total                |654                            


Table C Number of people detained as at 18 November  

1994, who                                            

had sought asylum, by location of detention          

                                   |Number           

                                   |Detained         

-----------------------------------------------------

Immigration service establishment                    

Campsfield House                   |154              

Gatwick Beehive                    |16               

Harmondsworth                      |90               

Manchester airport detention suite |8                

Queens building                    |25               

Stansted                           |8                

Newhaven                           |11               

Dover Harbour Board                |8                

Glasgow                            |1                

                                                     

Prison service establishment                         

Armley                             |14               

Birmingham                         |40               

Brinsford                          |6                

Bristol                            |2                

Brixton                            |4                

Bullingdon                         |3                

Canterbury                         |1                

Cardiff                            |1                

Chemlsford                         |3                

Crumlin Rd.                        |2                

Dorchester                         |1                

Durham                             |1                

Elmley                             |8                

Erlestoke House                    |1                

Exeter                             |2                

Feltham YC centre                  |2                

Greenock                           |2                

Harwich                            |1                

Haslar                             |74               

Highdown                           |5                

Hindley remand centre              |1                

Holloway                           |1                

Leicester                          |1                

Lewes                              |1                

Liverpool                          |1                

Norwich                            |3                

Pentonville                        |5                

Risley                             |1                

Rochester                          |60               

Saughton                           |1                

Shrewsbury                         |1                

Strangeways                        |6                

The Mount                          |1                

Wandsworth                         |7                

Winchester                         |7                

Winson Green                       |1                

Wolds remand prison                |3                

Wormwoods scrubs                   |4                

                                                     

Police cells                       |55               

                                                     

Total                              |654              

Mrs. Roche: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what is the average cost per week of detaining an asylum seeker under the Immigration Act 1971.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: The available information does not identify separately those detention costs which relate to asylum seekers. However, for the year ended 31 March 1994 the average weekly cost of accommodating all categories of detainee in detention accommodation for which the Immigration Service is responsible was estimated at just over £800 per detainee.

Mrs. Roche: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many asylum seekers detained


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under the Immigration Act 1971 have been released from detention as a result of an application to the courts for habeas corpus (a) in the past five years and (b) since 26 July 1993;

(2) how many asylum seekers detained under the Immigration Act 1971 have been released from detention as a result of an application to the High Court for bail (a) in the past five years and (b) since 26 July 1993.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: Information on the number of asylum seekers released from detention on bail as a result of an application to the High Court or as a result of an application for habeas corpus, is not separately identifiable in the statistics.

Mrs. Roche: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum seekers granted temporary admission to the United Kingdom while their asylum claim is examined by the Home Office have subsequently absconded or otherwise failed to comply with the terms of temporary admission (a) in the past five years and (b) since 1 January.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: The information requested is not available.

Anti-doping Convention

Mr. Pendry: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the measures that he proposed to fulfil the United Kingdom's obligations under article 4 of the Council of Europe anti- doping convention.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: The proposals which the Government announced on 2 November for imposing controls on anabolic steroids and on which I consulted my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for National Heritage, who has overall responsibility for the Council of Europe anti- doping convention, will help restrict their availability to sportsmen and women, among others, in conformity with the principles of article 4 of the convention.

Young Offenders

Mrs. Golding: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many young people are currently being held in adult prisons.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter have been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mrs. Llin Golding, dated 23 November 1994:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking how many young people are currently being held in adult prisons.

On 30 September 1994, 876 young persons (inmates aged between 15 and 20 and sentenced young offenders aged 21) were held in adult prisons (local prisons, closed training prisons and open prisons) in England and Wales.

Animal Experimentation

Mr. Morley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which animals currently come under which schedule of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986.


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