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Persons supervised by the probation service, England and Wales  

                         |30 June 1992|30 June 1993             

----------------------------------------------------------------

Probation orders         |51,884      |46,695                   

Community service orders |30,807      |36,180                   

Combination orders       |Nil<1>      |5,072                    

<1> Introduced on 1 October 1992.                               

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many posts he estimates were lost from the probation service in England and Wales during the financial years 1993 94 and 1994 95.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: Information recorded in probation services returns of staff establishment shows an increase of about 570 posts between 31 March 1993 and 30 June 1994, the latest date for which information is currently available.

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many probation service officers or their equivalent were employed by the probation service in England and Wales in (a) 1970, (b) 1980, (c) 1990 and (d) 1993.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: The number of probation services' officers-- formerly ancillaries--employed by probation services in England and Wales since 1980 is as follows:

1980 : 913

1990 : 1,918

1993 : 2,104

Information about 1970 is not readily available in the form requested.

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many staff and at what levels were employed by the probation service in England and Wales on 30 June 1991, 30 June 1992, 30 June 1993 and 30 June 1994.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: The information is given in the table.


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Staff employed by probation services in England and Wales, in                                                        

post at 30 June, full time or part time, by grade and type.                                                          

                      |30 June           |30 June           |30 June           |30 June                              

Probation Officers    |1991              |1992              |1993              |1994                                 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chief                 |55                |55                |55                |54                                   

Deputy and assistant                                                                                                 

  chief               |230               |252               |268               |270                                  

Senior                |1,152             |1,195             |1,261             |1,274                                

Main grade            |5,747             |6,013             |6,294             |6,419                                

                                                                                                                     

Total                 |7,184             |7,515             |7,878             |8,017                                

                                                                                                                     

Non-probation grade                                                                                                  

  staff                                                                                                              

Probation services                                                                                                   

  officers<1>         |1,955             |2,043             |2,116             |2,145                                

Clerical/secretarial  |4,407             |4,553             |4,697             |4,735                                

Administrative        |689               |745               |832               |936                                  

Other non-probation                                                                                                  

  grade staff<2>      |3,088             |3,095             |3,131             |3,011                                

Hostel staff          |843               |981               |1,141             |1,187                                

                                                                                                                     

Total non-probation                                                                                                  

  grade staff         |10,982            |11,417            |11,917            |12,014                               

                                                                                                                     

Total probation staff |18,166            |18,932            |19,795            |20,031                               

<1> Formerly ancillaries                                                                                             

<2> Figures include sessional supervisors on community service schemes, staff employed in student training units and 

on miscellaneous functions.                                                                                          

Figures exclude hostel staff.                                                                                        

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the average number of court reports compiled per qualified probation officer in England and Wales in (a) 1992, (b) 1993 and (c) 1994.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: The average number of reports completed per main grade probation officer was 52.5 in 1992 and 51.1 in 1993--table 12.3 of "Probation Statistics, England and Wales 1993". The information for 1994 is not yet available. The figures for probation officers are on the basis of whole time equivalents of established main grade probation officers on field work duties excluding temporary and trainee officers.

The Wolds Prison

Mr. Hall: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the number and types of instances where the required level of service has not been provided or specific contract terms have not been met by Group 4 since the start of the contract to run The Wolds prison.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Mike Hall, dated 2 February 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about Group 4 and the Wolds prison.

There has been one default notice. This was issued as a result of the escape of a prisoner from hospital, early in 1994.


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Departmental Reports

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects to publish the internal report and project on violence in prisons.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 2 February 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the Prison Service project to reduce violence against staff. The position on this project remains unchanged from that given in my letter of 20 December in reply to your earlier Question (Hansard 20 December, col 251), in which I indicated that there are no plans to publish the internal report which contains the preliminary results.

Prisons

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to limit use of private cash in prisons.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 2 February 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about what plans there are to limit private cash in prisons. The Secretary of State announced in the House on 19 December 1994 that a system under which prisoners would have to earn privileges would be introduced. At the same time, he stated that, as part of this new approach, the amount of private cash that prisoners


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are permitted to spend would be reduced. Detailed plans for the implementation of this policy are currently being finalised.

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the progress which has been made in respect of improvements in co-operation between Prison Service establishments in close proximity to each other.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 2 February 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking what assessment he has made of the progress in respect of improvements in co-operation between prison service establishments in close proximity to each other.

Community prison clustering arrangements are being developed in the Kent and East Anglia Areas; where co-ordinated regime provision and population management procedures are working satisfactorily. In addition, opportunities are being taken by other prisons in close proximity to share resources. Examples include the merger of Thorp Arch and Rudgate prisons and co-operation between Blakenhurst, Brockhill and Hewell Grange prisons.

Police (Overtime Payments)

Mr. Chidgey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what were (a) the total and (b) the average overtime payments for police officers in each police force in England and Wales for each year since 1990.

Mr. Maclean: The table shows overtime costs for each police force in 1992 93 and 1993 94. Figures for earlier years are not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. The average overtime payment has been calculated by dividing the total cost of overtime for the force by its recorded police strength as at 31 March in the year in question.


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                    |Total cost                                                                                         

                    |1992-93            |Average per officer|Total cost 1993-94 |Average per officer                    

Police overtime     |£                  |£                  |£                  |£                                      

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Avon and Somerset   |6,483,805          |2,113              |3,411,264          |1,125                                  

Bedfordshire        |2,465,006          |2,110              |2,005,596          |1,742                                  

Cambridgeshire      |3,482,000          |2,753              |2,452,994          |1,942                                  

Cheshire            |4,442,473          |2,328              |2,849,688          |1,498                                  

City of London      |2,173,705          |2,635              |2,414,334          |2,704                                  

Cleveland           |1,645,093          |1,113              |1,860,389          |1,302                                  

Cumbria             |2,355,384          |1,969              |1,772,714          |1,510                                  

Derbyshire          |3,258,958          |1,781              |2,606,392          |1,432                                  

Avon and Cornwall   |6,061,765          |2,083              |4,308,050          |1,478                                  

Dorset              |1,729,899          |1,329              |1,496,308          |1,154                                  

Durham              |1,670,907          |1,210              |1,850,700          |1,338                                  

Dyfed Powys         |2,142,357          |2,215              |1,385,499          |1,436                                  

Essex               |5,628,590          |1,917              |5,897,104          |2,008                                  

Gloucestershire     |1,539,963          |1,340              |1,986,563          |1,714                                  

Greater Manchester  |24,271,289         |3,438              |15,174,820         |2,178                                  

Gwent               |1,553,956          |1,548              |1,381,970          |1,392                                  

Hampshire           |7,107,374          |2,170              |6,577,017          |2,011                                  

Hertfordshire       |2,324,840          |1,368              |2,721,585          |1,618                                  

Humberside          |3,280,068          |1,614              |3,583,821          |1,758                                  

Kent                |5,598,524          |1,780              |6,013,068          |1,912                                  

Lancashire          |6,967,479          |2,173              |4,521,393          |1,426                                  

Leicestershire      |3,875,318          |2,147              |2,165,623          |1,187                                  

Lincolnshire        |2,343,488          |1,953              |2,090,057          |1,734                                  

Merseyside          |13,660,235         |2,926              |9,685,750          |2,064                                  

Norfolk             |3,484,596          |2,420              |2,926,125          |2,022                                  

Northamptonshire    |2,804,613          |2,339              |2,043,539          |1,747                                  

Northumbria         |10,559,857         |2,964              |6,289,065          |1,748                                  

North Wales         |2,351,525          |1,729              |2,037,388          |1,507                                  

North Yorkshire     |3,001,970          |2,155              |2,155,751          |1,636                                  

Nottinghamshire     |2,582,689          |1,110              |2,176,532          |935                                    

South Wales         |5,553,765          |1,749              |4,840,639          |1,546                                  

South Yorkshire     |7,415,640          |2,446              |6,150,043          |2,034                                  

Staffordshire       |3,716,068          |1,705              |3,555,875          |1,610                                  

Suffolk             |2,358,621          |1,901              |1,937,984          |1,604                                  

Surrey              |3,244,020          |1,916              |2,761,499          |1,655                                  

Sussex              |6,215,486          |2,066              |4,857,135          |1,614                                  

Thames Valley       |9,882,241          |2,574              |9,822,938          |2,514                                  

Warwickshire        |1,836,204          |1,800              |1,679,423          |1,606                                  

West Mercia         |4,261,532          |2,075              |3,097,475          |1,504                                  

West Midlands       |11,628,414         |1,672              |9,948,439          |1,418                                  

West Yorkshire      |7,933,671          |1,575              |7,361,286          |1,459                                  

Wiltshire           |2,387,129          |1,887              |1,653,739          |1,308                                  

Metropolitan        |76,857,000         |2,900              |71,113,000         |2,567                                  

Electric Shock Equipment

Mr. Llew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which companies he has issued with section 5 firearm licences for the storage, handling or development of electro-shock equipment since 1988.

Mr. Maclean: No company has been granted authority specifically to store, handle or develop electric shock weapons in the last three years. Information about the granting of authority for these purposes in earlier years could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

British Visitors Passports

Sir John Hunt: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many British visitors passports were issued in each of the years 1992, 1993, and 1994.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: The number of British visitors passports issued in each of the last three years was:

1992: 2,058,977

1993: 1,972,312

1994: 1,812,237

National Criminal Intelligence System

Mr. Byers: To ask the secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to his answer of 29 November 1994, Official Report, columns 552- 53, on the cost of developing the computer for the national criminal intelligence services, how many police officers were trained to use the new computer system; what is the cost of this training; how many police forces now share computer facilities; and if there is a requirement that a police authority establishing its own computer facilities must ensure that it is compatible with computers operated by other police authorities.

Mr. Maclean: As the integrated national criminal intelligence system did not proceed beyond the design stage, no police officers were trained to use the system. All police forces share some of their computer facilities; for example, through their use of the police national computer. The national strategy for police information


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systems, which was launched by my right hon. and learned Friend in November 1994 sets out arrangements for ensuring compatibility and interoperability between computers operated by different police forces.

Speeding

Mrs. Helen Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of persons prosecuted for speeding offences last year and the year before was male.

Mr. Maclean: The readily available information relates to the percentage of findings of guilt for speeding offences which had been committed by males and was 92 per cent. in 1993.

Figures for 1994 are not yet available.

Metropolitan Police

Mr. Tracey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures he is taking to enable the Metropolitan police to create a financial reserve.

Mr. Howard: I have arranged to make available to the Metropolitan police £20 million to help create a financial reserve. This sum represents the total value of savings the force has said that it expects to make against the cash limit for 1994 95. The reserve will be available for use in subsequent years outside the Metropolitan police non-voted cash limit and I am reducing the 1994 95 cash limit by £20,000,000 from £1,616,511,000 to £1,596,511,000 accordingly. The relevant sum of police current grant will be paid as a special grant under section 1 of the Police Act 1909.

This new flexibility is, I know, welcomed by the commissioner and the receiver.

Criminal Justice Act 1993

Sir Ivan Lawrence: To ask the Secretary of state for the Home Department, when he expects to implement the remaining confiscation provisions in the Criminal Justice Act 1993.

Mr. Howard: The Drug Trafficking Act 1994, which enters into force tomorrow, implements and consolidates the following drug trafficking confiscation provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 1993: sections 7 to 15, 24(1) to (11), section 25 and consequential amendments in schedule 5. These include new powers to obtain a


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revaluation of the defendant's proceeds of drug trafficking within six years of conviction and to confiscate the proceeds of drug traffickers who abscond or who die after conviction.

The following confiscation provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 1993 are also being brought into force tomorrow by means of Commencement Order No 8: sections 24(12) to (15), 27, 28 and 36 to 43, together with related provisions in schedules 5 and 6. The provisions mainly amend the Northern Ireland (Emergency Provisions) Act 1991, which provides for the confiscation of the proceeds of terrorist related activity in Northern Ireland.

With these measures the implementation of the Criminal Justice Act 1993, except part I of that Act, is complete. A further announcement about the implementation of part I will be made in due course.

Charity Commission Funding

Sir Ivan Lawrence: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what changes he has made to the cash limits and running costs limits for the Charity Commission for 1994 95.

Mr. Howard: Subject to parliamentary approval of the necessary supplementary estimate, the cash limit for class VIII, vote 4, Charity Commission, will be increased by £300,000 from £24,924,000 to £25,224,000 and the running costs limit by £200,000 from £23,254,000 to £23,454,000. The increases reflect a transfer of £300,000 from Property Holdings as a contribution towards the Charity Commission's removal and fitting out costs incurred during the relocation of its Liverpool office. The transfer represents part of an estate rationalisation scheme.

Departmental Funding

Sir Ivan Lawrence: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proposals he has for changes to the 1994 95 cash limits and running costs within his responsibilities.

Mr. Howard: Subject to parliamentary approval of the necessary supplementary estimate, the cash limit for class VIII, vote 3, Home Office administration, immigration, probation and police support services, England and Wales, will be increased by £20,422,000 from £1,212,721,000 to £1,233,163,000. This includes the take-up of £13,650, 000 running costs end year flexibility and £7,591,000 claim on the reserve. Transfers are also being made of £154,000 from the Department of National Heritage in respect of royal palace security work and £3,000 in respect of administration of additional housing costs allowance.

In consequence of these changes, the Home Office gross running cost limit will be increased by £13,653,000 from £1,706,176,000 to £1,719, 829,000.

The amount required has been reduced by a diminution in provision for administration of justice of £5,000,000; and by transfers of voted provision of £487,000 to the


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Crown Prosecution Service in respect of forensic science service charges: and £469,000 to the Department for Education for additional places for probation students. Additional spending on ethnic minority grants and DTELS residual privatisation will be offset by increased appropriations in aid.

Prison Escapes

Mrs. Roche: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many escapes occurred from prisons in the Greater London region in (a) 1979, (b) 1985 and (c) the last year for which figures are available;

(2) how many escapes occurred from prisons in (a) 1979, (b) 1985 and (c) the last year for which figures are available.

Mr. Michael Forsyth [holding answers 18 January 1995]: Responsibility for these matters has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mrs. Barbara Roche, dated 2 February 1995 :

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Questions about the number of escapes from prisons generally and the number from the Greater London region in (a) 1979, (b) 1985 and (c) the last year for which figures are available.

The information you request is shown in the table below:


                              |Escapes from                 

               |Escapes from  |Greater London               

Year           |Prisons       |Prisons                      

------------------------------------------------------------

1979           |97            |<2>n/a                       

1984-85        |114           |<2>n/a                       

1985-86        |117           |<2>n/a                       

1993-94        |<1>171        |11                           

<1> Excludes non-Key Performance Indicator escapes (i.e.    

those recaptured within 15 minutes).                        

<2> Information not available                               

Recruitment

Mr. Donohoe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much his Department spent during 1994 on recruiting staff to his Department and its executive agencies; and how many staff were recruited.

Mr. Howard [holding answer 27 January 1995]: Excluding the Prison Service, the Home Office spent £869,816 in 1994 on recruiting staff to the Department. This figure excludes salary costs. Some 850 staff were recruited. Figures for the Prison Service could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Stop and Search

Mr. Bernie Grant: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many stop and search incidents took place in each division of the Metropolitan police in each of the last three years; and if he will provide the ethnic breakdown of those stopped and searched.

Mr. Maclean [holding answer 26 January 1995]: Figures are not available for 1992, 1993 or, at present, for the final quarter of 1994. The tables give the divisional breakdown for each area of the Metropolitan police district, by ethnic appearance, for the first three quarters of 1994.


                                        |Black Afro       |Indian/Pakistani/|Other ethnic                                                           

                      |White            |Caribbean        |Bangladeshi      |minority         |Unknown          |Total                              

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1 Area                                                                                                                                              

Belgravia             |2,881            |534              |149              |313              |104              |3,981                              

Brompton              |2,617            |1,210            |149              |1,045            |75               |5,096                              

Notting Hill          |519              |705              |31               |298              |0                |1,553                              

West End Central      |4,459            |1,241            |273              |835              |1                |6,809                              

Charing Cross         |3,576            |740              |222              |723              |707              |5,968                              

Paddington            |1,710            |1,713            |289              |655              |300              |4,667                              

Marylebone            |1,488            |714              |170              |246              |169              |2,787                              

Fulham                |866              |522              |28               |53               |15               |1,484                              

Hammersmith           |1,192            |1,029            |93               |114              |329              |2,757                              

2 Area                                                                                                                                              

Hampstead             |848              |239              |49               |57               |4                |1,197                              

Kentish Town          |1,031            |350              |184              |113              |257              |1,935                              

Holborn               |1,830            |682              |119              |188              |106              |2,925                              

Holloway              |3,108            |1,728            |188              |509              |0                |5,533                              

Islington             |2,340            |886              |113              |242              |0                |3,581                              

Barnet                |1,377            |92               |38               |70               |0                |1,577                              

Golders Green         |674              |187              |64               |62               |95               |1,082                              

West Hendon           |1,003            |200              |65               |73               |0                |1,341                              

Harrow                |1,024            |233              |122              |19               |4                |1,402                              

Wembley               |531              |428              |238              |23               |35               |1,255                              

Kilburn               |1,017            |1,500            |135              |90               |152              |2,894                              

Ealing                |1,456            |981              |264              |99               |99               |2,899                              

Southall              |1,046            |534              |1,106            |30               |188              |2,904                              

Hornsey               |638              |566              |37               |108              |87               |1,436                              

Tottenham             |1,945            |2,462            |149              |736              |3                |5,295                              

3 Area                                                                                                                                              

Hackney               |2,178            |2,111            |205              |318              |361              |5,173                              

Stoke Newington       |2,396            |3,392            |303              |1,229            |0                |7,320                              

Limehouse             |1,342            |403              |231              |76               |246              |2,298                              

Whitechapel           |2,208            |805              |2,239            |173              |267              |5,692                              

Barkingside           |1,845            |189              |124              |72               |350              |2,580                              

Ilford                |1,539            |389              |349              |73               |111              |2,461                              

Leyton                |1,306            |972              |411              |97               |98               |2,884                              

Havering              |2,102            |88               |21               |28               |470              |2,709                              

Forest Gate           |1,680            |1,212            |1,033            |139              |0                |4,064                              

Dagenham              |1,780            |188              |56               |26               |20               |2,070                              

Plaistow              |1,485            |627              |380              |64               |164              |2,720                              

Edmonton              |1,734            |621              |134              |631              |95               |3,215                              

Enfield               |3,422            |258              |67               |371              |235              |4,353                              

Chingford             |976              |513              |192              |46               |131              |1,858                              

4 Area                                                                                                                                              

Southwark             |2,385            |485              |93               |111              |267              |3,341                              

Peckham               |3,126            |2,678            |66               |226              |879              |6,975                              

Walworth              |3,329            |2,155            |87               |268              |14               |5,853                              

Catford               |2,003            |677              |35               |92               |16               |2,823                              

Lewisham              |3,596            |3,283            |139              |331              |92               |7,441                              

Orpington and Bromley |4,574            |389              |45               |55               |24               |5,087                              

Plumstead             |1,643            |266              |53               |49               |192              |2,203                              

Greenwich             |4,743            |823              |115              |161              |314              |6,156                              

Bexleyheath           |3,929            |43               |64               |18               |0                |4,054                              

Croydon               |2,657            |618              |112              |61               |112              |3,560                              

South Norwood         |849              |390              |42               |25               |7                |1,313                              

Epsom and Sutton      |2,257            |116              |44               |59               |0                |2,476                              

5 Area                                                                                                                                              

Brixton               |988              |1,970            |24               |124              |316              |3,432                              

Streatham             |1,779            |1,573            |105              |96               |498              |4,051                              

Vauxhall              |2,881            |2,145            |113              |210              |255              |5,604                              

Hounslow              |1,324            |137              |383              |29               |0                |1,873                              

Chiswick              |1,483            |368              |305              |69               |1                |2,226                              

Twickenham            |1,101            |176              |80               |56               |352              |1,765                              

Spelthorne            |1,370            |21               |15               |21               |0                |1,427                              

Kingston              |2,044            |81               |47               |43               |0                |2,215                              

Wandsworth            |1,761            |952              |118              |82               |249              |3,162                              

Battersea             |1,239            |1,418            |93               |41               |66               |2,857                              

Hillingdon            |2,391            |147              |285              |69               |3                |2,895                              

Merton                |2,754            |439              |74               |93               |149              |3,509                              

Heathrow              |231              |32               |34               |16               |0                |313                                

Crime Victims (Telephone Hotline)

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department on what date the telephone hotline for crime victims was established; how many calls have been made to it; how many staff have been employed to operate the hotline; how many hours a day it is in operation; and what has been the total cost of operating the service since its inception.

Mr. Michael Forsyth [holding answer 30 January 1995]: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Stephen Byers, dated 2 February 1995 :

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the Victim's Helpline.

The Helpline started operation on 5 December 1994 and by 26 January had received 49 calls. Three staff are available at any one time, undertaking other duties when they are not taking calls. Initial start-up costs for staff training, telephone lines and equipment, and other items were £8,400. Subsequent running costs are estimated to be in the region of £6,000.

Asylum Seekers

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum seekers have made applications since the enactment of the Asylum and Immigration Appeals Act 1993; how many of these applications have been determined; and how many applicants whose cases have been detained have (a) been granted refugee status, (b) been granted exceptional leave to remain and (c) been refused.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: During the period 1 August 1993 to 31 December 1994, 20,255 decisions were taken on 41,765 applications for asylum which were lodged during the same period. A further 1,935 of these applications were withdrawn.

As at 30 January 1995, 471 persons who had sought asylum and had their application for asylum refused, were detained. This figure includes people awaiting removal following refusal of the application and dismissal of any appeal and those whose appeal was still pending. Information on the number of persons who have had an initial decision on their claim for asylum and who had at some time in the application stage spent time in detention, is not available.

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the cases unresolved at the date the Asylum and Immigration Appeals Act 1993 came into force remain unresolved.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: At 31 December 1994--the latest date for which information is available--an estimated 35,700 asylum applications which were lodged prior to the implementation of the Asylum and Immigration Appeals Act 1993, 26 July 1993 were outstanding.

WALES

National Park Authorities

Mr. Sweeney: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what advice he has given to local authorities and other bodies in Wales about the potential establishment of the


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national authorities provided for in the Environment Bill; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Redwood: I have today issued advice to the local authorities in Wales about the national park authorities which I intend to establish for the three national parks in Wales should the Environment Bill receive Royal Assent. I have placed a copy of this advice in the Library of the House.

The advice also covers the interaction between the national park provisions in the Local Government (Wales) Act 1994 and the Environment Bill, and the effect that local government reorganisation will have on the process of establishing Welsh national park authorities.

Further guidance will be issued once the Environment Bill is enacted and comments are being sought from the local authorities and other bodies in the interim.

The national park authorities in Wales will operate with the same purpose and duties, and with the same relationship towards their constituent local authorities as those in England.

Health Services (Resources)

Mr. Sweeney: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales if he has now reached decisions about the allocation of resources for hospital, community and family health and related services for Wales for 1995 96.

Mr. Redwood: I announced on 14 December, an additional £114 million for the national health service in Wales for 1995 96. This brings total NHS spending to £2,191 million. Within this sum I now propose to allocate £1,620 million to hospital and community health services and the cash limited element of the family health services in Wales. This amount will be distributed as follows: health authorities will receive £1,364.7 million for revenue purposes, an increase of £69.3 million or 5.3 per cent. over 1994 95 plans. They will also receive £118.7 million for capital investment.

£69.5 million is due to be invested in education and training for NHS staff. Family health services authorities will receive £12.6 million to meet their support costs and £50.8 million for general medical service practice costs. A further £3.6 million will be provided as contributions toward FHSA-related services; most notably as contributions toward the running cost of England and Wales bodies and centrally administered services.

In addition, authorities and trusts will be expected to generate efficiency savings of at least 3 per cent. This amounts to some £49 million including £3.25 million savings in management costs. These savings, together with the £82 million cash increase, will be available to meet inflationary and other pressures and enable further investment to be made in patient care.

Details of the allocations to health authorities and family health authorities and the provisional external financing limits for NHS trusts is contained in a statement which has been placed today in the Library of the House.

Departmental Cash Limits

Mr. Sweeney: To ask the Secretary of State for Wales what changes he proposes to make to the cash limits for his Department for the current financial year.

Mr. Redwood: Subject to parliamentary approval of the necessary supplementary estimates, the cash limit on class XV, vote 2 will be reduced by £8,000,000 from


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£153,581,000 to £145,581,000; the cash limit on class XV, vote 4 will be increased by £6,810,000 from £570,153,000 to £576,963,000, the cash limit on class XV, vote 8 will be reduced by £7,230,000 from £1,511,411,000 to £1,504,211,000; and the cash limit on class XV, vote 10 will be reduced by £1,000,000 from £2,214,412,000 to £2,213, 412,000.

The decrease on the cash limit for vote 2 results mainly from lower than expected expenditure on agricultural and environmental schemes and slippage on arterial drainage, flood and coast protection grant schemes. The increase in the cash limit for vote 4 will provide for an additional £4,500,000 for the Higher Education Funding Council for equipment and building maIntenance, £2,000,000 for equipment to expand the modern apprenticeship scheme and £310,000 for the enterprise initiative consultancy scheme transferred from class IV, vote 1.

The net decrease in the cash limit for vote 8 allows mainly for an additional £2,500,000 for improvements to the community dental service and a transfer of £9,757,000 of provision to class XV, vote 7 in respect of a revised estimate of drug expenditure for GP fundholders. This transfer comprises part of a spring supplementary estimate for class XV, vote 7 of £23,051,000.

The reduction of £1,000,000 in the cash limit for vote 10 results mainly from lower than expected unit costs at the Valuation Office Agency.

None of the proposed changes will add to the planned total of public expenditure.


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