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Column 511

Captain R. T. R. Phillips

Captain J. K. Covell

Captain A. E. Slater

Royal Marine ADC to the Queen

Colonel R. E. Dillon

Extra Naval Equerries to the Queen

Vice Admiral Sir Peter Ashmore

Rear Admiral Sir Richard Trowbridge

Rear Admiral Sir Paul Greening

Rear Admiral Sir John Garnier

Rear Admiral Robert Woodard

Lieutenant General Sir John Richards

Royal Naval Reserve ADC to the Queen

Captain D. A. Carr

Royal Marine Reserve ADC to the Queen

Colonel T. H. Lang

Royal Navy Honorary Chaplains to the Queen

The Ven. M. W. Bucks

Rev. W. E. Weldon

Rev. B. F. Neill

Rev. R. G. Devonshire

Army Honorary Chaplains to the Queen

The Ven. A. Deen

Rev. Dr. V. Dobbin

Rev. J. Holliman

Rev. R. McAllen

RAF Honorary Chaplains to the Queen

Rev. J. Shedden

Rev. G. B. McVoy

The Ven. B. H. Lucas

Rev. P. R. Turner

Royal Navy Honorary Physicians to the Queen

Surgeon Rear Admiral A. Craig

Surgeon Captain D. L. Swain

Surgeon Commodore R. Harland

Army Honorary Physicians to the Queen

Major General G. O. Cowan

Brigadier W. R. Short

Brigadier M. D. Conroy

Brigadier T. B. N. Oldrey

Brigadier G. C. Callow

RAF Honorary Physicians to the Queen

Air Commodore J. R. Creig

Air Vice Marshal J. A. Baird

Air Commodore A. F. Johnson

Air Commodore J. D. C. Baxandall

Royal Navy Honorary Surgeons to the Queen

Surgeon Commodore I. L. Jenkins

Surgeon Vice Admiral A. L. Revell

Surgeon Commodore M. P. W. H. Paine

Army Honorary Surgeons to the Queen

Major General F. B. Mayes

Brigadier D. G. Stork

Brigadier M. H. Daly


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Colonel D. W. Herring

Brigadier B. Rowe

RAF Honorary Surgeons to the Queen

Air Commodore D. H. Hull

Air Commodore F. K. Amroliwalla

Air Commodore A. Nicholson

Air Commodore H. Wober

Royal Navy Honorary Dental Surgeon to the Queen

Surgeon Commodore E. J. Grants

Army Honorary Dental Surgeons to the Queen

Brigadier C. D. Parkinson

Brigadier R. A. Smart

RAF Honorary Dental Surgeons to the Queen

Air Commodore D. W. Marchant

Air Vice Marshall J. Mackey

Royal Naval Reserve Honorary Surgeon to the Queen

Surgeon Captain T. A. Waterworth

Royal Navy Honorary Nursing Officer to the Queen

Principal Nursing Officer C. M. Taylor

Army Honorary Nursing Officers to the Queen

Brigadier H. S. Dixon-Nuttall

Lieutenant Colonel A. Clouston

RAF Honorary Nursing Officer to the Queen

Group Captain V. M. Hand

Fraud

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much money was spent by his Department in each of the last 10 years to combat fraud.

Mr. Soames: Figures are available only from 1991 92 and relate to the cost of the Ministry of Defence police fraud squad and the defence fraud unit. They are as follows:


Year      |Cost               

------------------------------

1991-92   |783,000            

1992-93   |932,000            

1993-94   |1,079,000          

1994-95   |1,087,000          

A good deal of effort is expended elsewhere in my Department to combat fraud, but the cost of this could not be separately identified.

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many investigations into fraud have been made within his Department in each of the last 10 years.

Mr. Soames: Complete figures are available only from 1986 and include cases where the alleged fraud was not against my Department.


Year           |Investigations               

---------------------------------------------

1986           |3,983                        

1987           |3,275                        

1988           |3,205                        

1989           |2,251                        

1990           |3,837                        

1991           |4,413                        

1992           |3,260                        

1993           |<1>2,277                     

<1> Includes MOD police investigations for   

January to March 1994.                       

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how much money his Department has lost through fraud in each of the last 10 years.

Mr. Soames: The values of reported fraud for the financial years 1984 85 to 1993 94 inclusive are as follows:


          |£                  

------------------------------

1984-85   |41,000             

1985-86   |199,000            

1986-87   |244,000            

1987-88   |1,039,000          

1988-89   |334,000            

1989-90   |233,000            

1990-91   |984,000            

1991-92   |63,000             

1992-93   |205,000            

1993-94   |571,000            

These figures exclude "procurement fraud"--fraud perpetrated by contractors, including corruption of officials by contractors and collusion between officials and contractors--which is often difficult to quantify precisely.

No abatement is made for subsequent recoveries.

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list by name the five fraud cases which have cost his Department the most money in the last 10 years.

Mr. Soames: The largest fraud cases characteristically relate to procurement fraud, where the extent of the cash loss to the Department is often difficult to quantify with any precision. The five highest value cases were as follows:


Case                                        |Year     

------------------------------------------------------

Director of Ammunition Procurement (Foxley) |1994     

VMS Ltd.                                    |1991     

Chellingworth and Singer Ltd.               |1990     

Gateway Motor Auctions                      |1987     

CAS Aviation and Marine International       |1986     

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what actions he has taken to combat fraud within his Department.

Mr. Soames: My Department has taken a range of measures to deter and detect fraud and to make staff aware of the need for vigilance. All suspected cases are vigorously pursued and an internal statement on fraud policy and law makes it clear that we will not tolerate dishonest behaviour among our employees. Investigations into suspected fraud are undertaken by the Ministry of Defence police fraud squad. The service police similarly investigate fraud in the service environment. The deterrence of fraud forms part of high level management plans with requirements placed upon senior line management to impose sound controls, follow up suspicions, and report suspected fraud. There is a


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consultative panel on fraud and irregularity which is being reconstituted to involve line management representation, supported by a defence fraud unit which is tasked with collating information, assessing policy options and raising fraud awareness. Private sector expertise has been drawn on in the development of a methodology for fraud risk assessment. In the procurement field there has been extension of competitive procurement, a greater rotation of duties in significant procurement posts, and stress on fraud awareness.

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the cases when employees of his Department have (a) been tried and (b) been successfully convicted of fraud in each of the last 10 years.

Mr. Soames: My noble Friend the Under-Secretary of State for Defence will write to the hon. Member and a copy of the letter will be placed in the Library of the House.

Army Base Repair Organisation, Old Dalby

Mr. Fatchett: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the prospects of allocating new sources of his Department's work to ABRO, Old Dalby.

Mr. Freeman: Prior to my announcement on 27 October 1994 of the intention to withdraw work from ABRO Old Dalby, ABRO had undertaken a number of studies to determine the practicality of moving work from its other facilities into Old Dalby. The studies clearly demonstrated that such a course of action was not cost-effective. ABRO also assessed the potential for transferring work undertaken by private contractors into Old Dalby, but concluded that this was neither practical nor cost-effective. The other services are also looking at the need to make effective use of the repair facilities at their disposal and some further rationalisation and consolidation of repair work may result from the defence costs study recommendation for tri-service rationalisation. This will not, however, alter the decision to withdraw all MOD work from ABRO, Old Dalby.

Mr. Fatchett: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on possible private sector interest in purchasing all or part of ABRO, Old Dalby.

Mr. Freeman: Following my announcement of 31 January 1995 that MOD operations were to cease at the ABRO, Old Dalby workshop, a number of companies have expressed tentative interest in some of the facilities. As yet, however, none of these amount to substantive proposals.

Any costed proposals received before the end of July 1995 will be carefully considered to see if they offer improved value for money compared with transferring work to ABROs Donnington or Bovington workshops or elsewhere within MOD. It is important to bear in mind however that the primary objective of the Old Dalby closure is to rationalise excess capacity within ABRO by moving work to other workshops where spare capacity exists.

Industry has been invited to come forward with non-MOD uses for the Old Dalby workshop.


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