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Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The Crown Office has drawn no conclusions from settlement of a civil litigation which proceeded upon the basis of allegations which are different in detail from those contained within the charges in the petition warrants for the arrest of the two Libyans accused of this crime.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether the Scottish police have interviewed Maurice Callejas, Commander of the Maltese armed forces in 1988.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what positive identification took place by anyone interviewed by the Scottish police in Malta of Libyan suspects.


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Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: My noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate cannot disclose details of the evidence in the Lockerbie case while criminal proceedings are pending.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland on what dates Scottish police interviewed Dr. David Fieldhouse, Bradford police surgeon, in connection with his work in the Lockerbie area in December 1988.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: Dr. Fieldhouse travelled to Lockerbie on a number of occasions in early 1989. He held discussions there with officers of Dumfries and Galloway police concerning his involvement in the identification and examination of Lockerbie victims. These discussions culminated in his submission of a detailed statement to them on 22 April 1989.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the Crown Office endorsed the apology given in his written report by Sheriff John Mowat to Dr. David Fieldhouse for overlooking his information about Lockerbie body DCF 12 Male, Hillside NE of Shawhill farm and of the undeserved criticism of his activities.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: Sheriff Principal Mowat QC did not apologise for overlooking information about a body but apologised for criticism which had been made of Dr. Fieldhouse during the fatal accident inquiry relating to the Lockerbie disaster. The Sheriff Principal found in terms that Dr. Fieldhouse had pronounced life extinct in 58 bodies. That accorded with the evidence of the police at the fatal accident inquiry.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland pursuant to the letter JAD/91 of 9 January from Mr. J. A. Dunn, senior legal assistant at the Crown Office, to Mr. Martin Cadman, father of a victim of Pan Am 103, what new material arising from examination of the film "Maltese Double Cross" has been investigated and subjected to detailed scrutiny.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: It would be inappropriate to disclose the results of the examination of a film purporting to investigate the Lockerbie bombing while criminal proceedings are pending.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the Crown Office has sought to interview Mr. James Shaughnessy, lawyer for Pan Am, with regard to United States-United Kingdom surveillance of the Iranian embassy in Beirut in the second half of 1988.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if (a) the Crown Office and (b) the Scottish police have sought to interview Mr. Ali Nuri Zadeh about his reports in the Al Dustur newspaper involving Matthew Gannon and Charles McKee, both of whom perished at Lockerbie.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what consideration the Crown Office has given to the


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advancing age of those witnesses whom the prosecution proposes to lead in court in relation to the Lockerbie case.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The Crown Office has noted the passing of time.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what grounds the Crown Office has for supposing that a criminal trial in relation to Lockerbie can still be anticipated as indicated in the Lord Advocate's letter, CAD/E/MP/286/93.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: A trial will take place as and when the Libyans make the two accused available for trial in Scotland or the United States as required by the resolutions of the United Nations Security Council.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether the journalist, Alasdair Palmer, is employed in any capacity by Her Majesty's Government.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: Alasdair Palmer is not employed in any capacity by Her Majesty's Government.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what knowledge he has of body DCF 12 Male, Hillside, NE of Shawhill farm found at Lockerbie by Dr. David Fieldhouse.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: At the fatal accident inquiry relating to the Lockerbie disaster, Dr. Fieldhouse gave evidence that there was no record of the body which he had labelled as DCF 12 being found by the police. Dr. Fieldhouse went on to state that the assumption was that there had been human error in recording the location of that body although he considered it to be unlikely that the error could have arisen from his involvement at that particular location. Dr. Fieldhouse went on to state that the suggested locations given by him for bodies did not match up in all cases with the police information. Having considered all the evidence, the Sheriff Principal, in his determination, concluded that Dr. Fieldhouse pronounced life extinct in 58 bodies. That accorded with the evidence of the police at the fatal accident inquiry.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will place in the Library the 18 separate statements that Tony Gavci, clothing shopkeeper of Malta, gave to Scottish police.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: My noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate cannot disclose details of evidence while criminal proceedings are pending.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the Scottish police have a sworn statement from Her Majesty's Customs Officer Philip Connolly.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland whether a British Customs officer stationed in Cyprus in 1988 has been questioned by the Scottish police about controlled drug deliveries.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.


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Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the evidence presented to the Crown Office following the presentation of the petition charging named Libyan individuals to the sheriff of Dumfries was regarded by them at the time as being sufficient for them to conclude their investigations; and on what date they deemed their investigations to be concluded.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The evidence presented to the prosecuting authorities by the police was sufficient to enable the procurator fiscal to request petition warrants for the arrest of the two named accused from the sheriff at Dumfries. As has always been made clear, the investigation remains open.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what directions or instructions to investigate recent allegations of Iranian and Syrian involvement in the bombing of Pan Am flight 103, the Crown Office has given the Dumfries and Galloway police in relation to the directions and instructions of the procurator fiscal.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear, in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the Dumfries and Galloway police have interviewed (a) officials of the United States embassy who were in Nicosia in 1988 to determine what they knew of events leading up to the Lockerbie disaster and (b) the 1988 CIA station chief in Nicosia and the Drugs Enforcement Agency country attache.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear, in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what consideration the Crown Office has given to its legal duty in law to consider and investigate any evidence which tends to exculpate the two libyans accused of the Lockerbie crime; and if the Crown Office is complying with this legal obligation.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The Crown Office considers all relevant evidence and carries out such investigations as are appropriate and will continue to do so in the exercise of its duties.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what inquiries the Crown Office have made of Mr. Larry Robinson, of the United States embassy in London, on the issue of persons, in addition to two Libyans, being involved in the Lockerbie crime.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear, in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details of investigative steps which have been taken.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much in (a) US dollars (b) pounds sterling and (c) other currencies was collected from the scene of the Lockerbie disaster in December 1988, other than the normal personal money of passengers and crew members of the aircraft; and if he will make a statement.


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Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: No amounts of money, other than what might ordinarily be regarded as personal money, were found at the Lockerbie crash site. A cashed cheque and substantial quantities of encashed travellers cheques were recovered.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what conclusions the Crown Office has drawn from evidence presented in the court at Karlsruhe in relation to the Lockerbie bombing on 26 April 1989 as to the source of the radios; and what state of preparation they were in when bought.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: My noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate cannot disclose details of evidence while criminal proceedings are pending.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the Dumfries and Galloway police were present throughout the interview with Mr. Ghadanfar in Frankfurt on 26 October 1988.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: Dumfries and Galloway constabulary had no interest in Mr. Ghadanfar in October 1988. It will be recalled that the Lockerbie bombing did not take place until 21 December 1988.

Mr. Stewart: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what instructions or directions to investigate allegations of involvement of countries other than Libya, in the destruction of Pan Am 103, the Crown Office has given the Dumfries and Galloway police in relation to the instructions and directions of the procurator fiscal.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: As my noble and learned Friend the Lord Advocate has made clear, in relation to the Lockerbie case, as in any other case, it is not appropriate for the investigating or prosecuting authorities to give details investigative steps which have been taken.

Fatal Accident Inquiries

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how many deaths of hospital patients have led to fatal accident inquiries being held in (a) Renfrewshire, (b) Strathclyde and (c) Scotland in each of the past 10 years; of these, how many were concerned with an inquiry into the death of a patient during or following surgical care; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: The information requested is not available and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Procurators Fiscal

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what guidance, assistance or training is given to procurators fiscal to enable them to examine the question both death certificates and medical notes concerning hospital patients who have died either during surgical care or following such treatment; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: A significant proportion of procurators fiscal will have studied forensic medicine at university. On joining the procurator fiscal service, they will receive training in relation to the procurator fiscal's role in the investigation of sudden, suspicious or unexplained deaths. In 1992 93 the Crown Office reached agreement with the departments of forensic medicine of the universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Dundee and Aberdeen for the departments to


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take an active part in the initial and in- service training of procurators fiscal through courses organised both locally and nationally. In addition, the four departments of forensic medicine are under contract to provide procurators fiscal with an advisory consultative service on medical matters. The Departments will also assist procurators fiscal in the interpretation of medical records including the records of persons who have died in hospital or following treatment in hospital.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if a procurator fiscal can issue a requirement to examine medical notes concerning a patient who has died (a) during surgery care or (b) following surgical care; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: A procurator fiscal may apply to the sheriff court for a warrant to recover hospital records. In practice such records are made available on request.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if death certificates are sent by medical practitioners, to procurators fiscal, as (a) a matter of course or (b) as a legal requirement, following the deaths of hospital patients (i) during surgical care or (ii) following surgical care; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: It is the duty of the procurator fiscal to inquire into all sudden, suspicious, accidental, unexpected and unexplained deaths, including certain deaths associated with the provision of medical care. Instructions have been given to hospitals, nursing homes and general practitioners, that where a patient has died in certain circumstances, the procurator fiscal must be informed without delay. The responsibility for notification lies with the doctor concerned with the care of the patient or the doctor called in at the time of death. There is no requirement on medical practitioners to send a death certificate to the procurator fiscal. However, arrangements have been made between the Registrar General for Scotland and the Crown Office whereby district registrars will report to the procurator fiscal deaths falling into the categories of deaths into which procurators fiscal must inquire. The registrar will bring such deaths to the attention of the procurator fiscal by sending him an intimation of the particulars relating to the deceased. The intimation will include details of the cause of death as disclosed by the medical certificate.

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Aberdeen, South, (Mr. Robertson) of 15 February, Official Report, column 697 , on provision for children's evidence, if the closed circuit television equipment currently being installed in the Sheriff court, Greenock, is to be a permanent fixture in relation to the taking of evidence from vulnerable witnesses; and if he will make a statement.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton: Since 30 September 1991, equipment has been available in the sheriffdoms of Glasgow and Strathkelvin and Lothian and borders to enable child witnesses only, in appropriate cases, to give evidence in criminal trials by way of live television link. The equipment being installed at Greenock sheriff court will be available for cases transferred from other courts in the sheriffdom of north Strathclyde. Provision in that sheriffdom to enable child witnesses to give evidence in criminal trials by closed circuit television will be reviewed no later than 1997, at which time it is expected


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that major building works at Paisley sheriff court will have been completed.

Secular Buildings

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland how much money Historic Scotland is providing for the renovation and conservation of listed secular buildings in (a) Inverclyde, (b) Strathclyde and (c) Scotland as a whole in the current financial year.

Sir Hector Monro: The subject of the question relates to matters undertaken by Historic Scotland. I have asked its director and chief executive, Mr. Graeme Munro, to write to the hon. Member.

Letter from Graeme N. Munro to Dr. Godman, dated 6 March 1995: You have tabled a Parliamentary Question to the Secretary of State for Scotland for Written Answer on 6 March.

The question relates to operational matters undertaken by Historic Scotland and I have been asked to provide the information you are seeking. The terms of this letter will be reproduced in the Official Report and a copy of it will also be deposited in the Library of the House.

You have asked how much money Historic Scotland is providing for the renovation and conservation of listed secular buildings in (a) Inverclyde (b) Strathclyde and (c) Scotland as a whole in the current financial year.

The total commitment in the current financial year (that is, payments already made and payments in the pipeline which will be effected prior to 31 March 1995) on historic buildings repair grants for secular buildings in the current financial year is as follows: (a) Inverclyde: £103,490

(b) Strathclyde: £5,028,850

(c) Scotland: £9,576,000

I hope this information is helpful.

Taxis (Wheelchair Access)

Dr. Godman: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what proposals he has to ensure that newly licensed taxis and private hire vehicles are wheelchair accessible; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Kynoch: The Government's response on 22 February to the recommendations contained in the report of the Transport Select Committee-- Cm 2715--expressed support for the phasing in of the requirement that taxis should be accessible to wheelchair users. Legislation in Scotland relating to taxis and private hire cars is contained in the Civic Government (Scotland) Act 1982. We are now considering in the context of Scottish legislation and circumstances how best to proceed in this matter.

Rail Services

Mr. Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what advice he has given to the rail regulator on the need for formal consultation, prior to the withdrawal of any Anglo-Scottish rail services.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton [holding answer 3 March 1995]: None. The duties of the rail regulator, including the duty to protect rail users' interests, are defined in statute.

Mr. Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if the speech of the hon. Member for Dumfries (Sir H. Monro) in the Scottish Grand Committee, concerning


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consultation on proposed withdrawal of rail services, represents the policy of Her Majesty's Government.

Lord James Douglas-Hamilton [holding answer 3 March 1995]: Yes.

Mr. John Robertson

Mr. Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he will list the public positions to which he has appointed Mr. John Robertson of the S. and J. D. Robertson Group, stating in each case the salary and expenses, the required weekly commitment of working days and Mr. Robertson's particular qualifications for the appointment.

Mr. Lang [holding answer 3 March 1995]: I have appointed Mr. Robertson to the following positions:


                                                |Weekly time              

Organisation          |Position    |Salary      |commitment               

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Highland Health Board |Chairman    |£14,835 pa  |2-3 days                 

Highlands and Islands                                                     

  Enterprise          |Member      |£ 7,410 pa  |0.5 days                 

In addition to salary, Mr. Robertson is re-imbursed any expenses incurred in connection with these appointments at the rate appropriate to the body concerned. Mr. Robertson's appointment as chairman of Highland health board extends until 31 March 1999 and his appointment as a member of Highlands and Islands Enterprise until 30 September 1995. Mr. Robertson has said that he does not wish to be considered for re-appointment to Highlands and Islands Enterprise. Since 27 August 1990 Mr. Robertson has been a lay member of the national health service tribunal. This position carries no remuneration but allowances are payable to cover loss of remunerative time and travelling


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expenses incurred in connection with the work of the tribunal. However, the tribunal has not met since Mr. Robertson's appointment. On 6 February I announced Mr. Robertson's appointment as a chairman of the North of Scotland Water Authority. He will take up these duties later this year and they will entail an average time commitment of two and a half days per week for which he will received £40,000 per annum plus expenses. The appointment will be for four years. When he agreed to accept this appointment, Mr. Robertson told my officials that, on taking up the post, he wished to forgo the payments for his public service with the health board and Highlands and Islands Enterprise. This is in line with the action he took for several years with Orkney health board.

Mr. Robertson has a range of skills and experience built up through many years of public service and through running a property and oil distribution business. His links in the highlands and islands have made him particularly suitable for the appointments he has held and should also prove invaluable in connection with his forthcoming role as chairman of the North of Scotland Water Authority.

North of Scotland Electricity Users Consultative Committee

Mr. Wilson: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland when he expects to announce the appointment of a chairman for the north of Scotland electricity users consultative committee; and what criteria he will apply in making his decision.

Mr. Kynoch [holding answer 3 March 1995]: Responsibility for the appointment of chairmen of the electricity consumers' committees lies with the Director General of Electricity Supply after consultation with the Secretary of State. It is understood that the director general intends to appoint a new chairman of the north of Scotland consumers' committee in late March.


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