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set-aside land for non-food outlets and oil produced will mainly have been used for bio-fuels and in pharmaceuticals. In 1994 this had risen to 78,402 hectares.

There is no scheme information on the amount of short rotation coppice grown for bio-fuels but it is estimated that in 1993 90 hectares had been planted for this purpose, and increased to 230 hectares in 1994. Under the third order under the non-fossil fuel obligation, NFFO 3, it is expected that over the next few years 5,000 to 7,000 hectares of short rotation coppice could be established. The use of agricultural crops are renewable raw materials for industry and energy is a new development which the Government are keen to foster.

Milk

Mr. Alex Carlile: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what percentage of milk quota is currently owned by persons who are not active dairy farmers; and if he will make a statement

Mr. Jack: The intervention board keeps a record of individual producer's milk quota but not their milk production. Information on the percentage of milk quota owned by non-producing quota holders is therefore not available.

Mr. Martyn Jones: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what measures are currently being taken in respect of the black market in milk.

Mr. Jack: The industry has taken excellent advantage of the intervention board's fraud freephone and provided many reports of trading in black market milk. The agency's team of investigators are vigorously following up a number of leads.

Mr. Boyes: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will list all White Papers, Green Papers and pamphlets issued by his Department, or agencies for which it is responsible, in 1994, giving in each case the total cost to the Exchequer of their production publication and distribution and what was the total equivalent cost in 1980.

Mr. Waldegrave [ holding answer 2 march 1995]: In respect of those White Papers, Green Papers and other publications published by HMSO all costs are borne by HMSO who aim to recover these from sales revenue. In addition, MAFF produces a wide range of reports, information booklets and other publications which are listed in the Department's publications catalogue, copies of which have been placed in the Library of the House. The cost of producing, publishing and distributing such material in 1994 95 is expected to be about £2.2 million. Expenditure relating to all individual items could be ascertained only at disproportionate cost, but I should be happy to provide the hon. Member with further details relating to any publications in which he is particularly interested.

Publications produced by MAFF agencies are the responsibility of their chief executives. I have asked them to reply direct to the hon. Member.

Figures for 1980 are not available in a comparable form.


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Letter from Dr. P. I. Stanley to Mr. Roland Boyes, dated 13 March 1995 :

Expenditure in 1994 by MAFF and its Agencies on White Papers, Green Papers and Pamphlets

No White Papers or Green Papers were published by the Central Science Laboratory (CSL) in 1994. However the Agency produced several information pamphlets including a Statement of Standards and several information pamphlets including a Statement of Standards and Quality of Service. The total cost of producing, publishing and distributing such material in the 1994 95 financial year is about £9,500. CSL was launched as an executive agency of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (MAFF) on 1 April 1992 and therefore no comparable figure is available for 1980, when CSL formed part of the Department.

Letter from T. W. A. Little to Mr. Roland Boyes, dated 13 March 1995 :

The Minister has asked me to reply to your question about White Papers, Green Papers and Pamphlets issued by Agencies in 1994. CVL publishes a number of pamphlets aimed at assisting the marketing of its services. In 1994 the cost of production of these items was £8,900 including VAT. The material is distributed in a wide variety of ways including handing-out at conferences and exhibitions, mailed with other material or collected from CVL Reception. Costs of distribution are not therefore kept separately.

CVL became an Agency in 1990 and so it is not possible to provide comparable costs with 1980 when CVL was part of the Department.

Letter from G. K. Bruce to Mr. Roland Boyes, dated 13 March 1995:

The Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food has asked me to reply, in respect of the Pesticides Safety Directorate, to your question about expenditure on selected publications.

The Pesticides Safety Directorate (PSD) has not produced any White papers or Green papers in 1994/95. It has produced two pamphlets; one setting out our customer service standards and one describing the work of the agency. The cost of producing these pamphlets was £1,655. Costs of other pamphlets with a wider Food Safety emphasis have been borne centrally and therefore covered in the return from MAFF.

As PSD was established as an agency on 1 April 1993 comparable figures for 1980 are not available.

Letter from J. M. Rutter to Mr. Roland Boyes, dated 6 March 1995:

The Minister has asked me to reply to your question about the cost of the production, publication and distribution of certain publications by the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD), as this is an operational matter for which I am responsible.

The Directorate was not established as a Next Steps Agency until 2 April 1990, nor does it issue any white papers or green papers. In 1994, the VMD issued the following pamphlets:

Sheep Dipping -- published jointly in May 1994 with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and Department of the Environment. Production costs were met by the HSE, but the VMD paid for the distribution of copies to the 90,000 registered sheep farmers in the UK. The total cost of this distribution was £22,153.62.

VMD Customer Service Statement -- published in July 1994. The total production and distribution costs for 7,000 copies was £3, 453.13.

Two further pamphlets were published in house during 1994 at no extra cost.

AMELIA 1 -- Provisional Marketing Authorisations.

(A guidance note on new authorisation arrangements for veterinary medicines published in September 1994).

Veterinary Medicinal Products (Dips, injectables, pour ons and sprays) available in the UK for use as ectoparasiticides in sheep -- (Published in December 1994).


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Letter from Guy Stapleton to Mr. Roland Boyes, dated 13 March 1995:

The Minister of Agriculture Fisheries and Food has asked me to reply to your question about publications issued by the Ministry and MAFF-related agencies, as the information for the Intervention Board is a matter within my operational responsibility.

In 1994 HMSO published the Agency's Annual Report and Accounts 1993 94; the cost of copies for general sale was borne by HMSO, but the Intervention Board paid £12,500 for producing copies for the Agency's use. HMSO also published the Intervention Board's Annual Report for 1980 (Cmnd 8283). No expenditure was incurred by the Board.

The Agency itself publishes a range of scheme and information leaflets. These are listed in our Annual Reports, which are available in the Library of the House. Printing costs in 1994 were £28,225. Figures for 1980 are not available in a comparable form.

Letter from Dr. J. M. Walsh to Mr. Roland Boyes, dated 13 March 1995:

I have been asked by the Minister of Agriculture to reply direct to you concerning the question you tabled on Thursday 2nd March. In this you asked for a list of all white papers, green papers and pamphlets issued by his Department, or agencies, in 1994, giving in each case, the total cost to the Exchequer of their production, publication and distribution. You also required the total equivalent cost in 1980.

As an Agency, ADAS has not produced any white papers, green papers or equivalent pamphlets. ADAS was formed as an executive agency in 1992 so no comparison would be possible with the year 1980. ADAS continues to produce a number of leaflets in support of the marketing related to its commercial activity.

Lambs

Mr. Wigley: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what proposals he has put forward in the European Council of Ministers to eliminate the


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additional grants available for slaughtering in continental countries, after a short period of residency, of lambs reared in Wales but which thereafter qualify as lambs of these other countries and benefit from grant eligibility for which they would not have qualified had they been slaughtered in Wales; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Jack: I am not aware that any member state of the EU is paying slaughter premiums on lambs slaughtered in its abattoirs. Such premiums would distort competition and constitute an illegal state aid. I would not hesitate to encourage the Commission to take action in the face of evidence that any such grants were paid.

Welsh lamb slaughtered in, say, France currently attracts a premium price on the market as compared with Welsh lamb exported to France in carcase form. This is because lambs slaughtered in France carry a French health stamp and can legitimately be described as "home killed", whatever their origin.

The Meat and Livestock Commission is making every effort to promote the image of British carcase meat exports on EU markets and has the full support of the Government in doing so.

Mr. Wigley: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many lambs were sold to market from farms in (a) England, (b) Scotland and (c) Wales in each of the past five years; and how many of the lambs from each country were exported.

Mr. Jack: The total number of United Kingdom lamb marketings are given in the following table. These are then broken down by those slaughtered in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, and those exported live from the UK as a whole.

The number of lambs exported live is not broken down below the UK level.


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Lamb marketings 1989 to 1994                                                 

thousand head                                                                

                            |1989  |1990  |1991  |1992  |1993  |1994         

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total UK Lamb marketings<1> |18,296|18,564|19,937|18,840|17,892|n/a          

of which;                                                                    

Lamb Slaughterings<2>                                                        

England                     |12,130|12,556|13,315|12,349|11,345|11,062       

Wales                       |2,177 |2,102 |2,276 |1,673 |1,868 |1,705        

Scotland                    |2,815 |2,787 |3,048 |2,989 |3,104 |3,271        

Northern Ireland            |731   |733   |617   |955   |978   |776          

UK                          |17,853|18,177|19,255|17,966|17,295|16,814       

Live exports<3> UK          |442   |386   |681   |874   |597   |n/a          

<1> Home killed slaughter plus recorded live exports.<2> Home killed         

slaughter of other sheep and lambs.                                          

<3> Source:                                                                  

1989-1992 Central Statistical Office, 1993 MDS Transmodal. Sheep under 1     

year.                                                                        

1993 data, based on the new system of recording trade between EU countries ( 

Intrastat),are provisional. They are thought to under-recorded the true      

level of exports.                                                            

Data for 1994 are not yet available.                                         

Live exports are not broken down below the UK level.                         

Alkaloids in Foods

Mr. Nicholas Winterton: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, what research his Department is currently funding or initiating into the effects of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in foods: who is undertaking that research: what is its purpose: and if he will make a statement.

Mrs. Browning: The Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food is currently funding one project at the university of Glasgow on pyrrolizidine alkaloids in foods. The


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project will study the relative toxicities of different pyrrolizidine alkaloids and should improve assessment of risk from ingestion of these alkaloids. Results of recent surveillance of levels of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in UK honey were published in the February edition of the Food Safety Information Bulletin.

Juice Plus

Mr. Campbell-Savours: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food what correspondence has


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been exchanged or received by or between Ministers in his Department in the last three years on the use, distribution or approval of Juice Plus.

Mrs. Browning: None.

Food Poisoning

Mr. Redmond: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food if he will list the number of cases of food poisoning reported from (a) salmonella and (b) campylobacter in each of the last 10 years.

Mr. Sackville: I have been asked to reply.

Data for 1981 to 1993 are published in the Steering Group on the Microbiological Safety of Food Annual Report 1993, copies of which are available in the Library.

The confirmed total for 1993 for all salmonellas is 30,654 and the provisional figure for 1994 is 30,427.

The provisional figure for 1994 for campylobacter is 44,315. The 1993 figure is still provisional at 39,383.

Anthrax

Mr. Morley: To ask the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food how many cases of anthrax have been reported in each year since 1985.

Mrs. Browning: The number of confirmed cases of anthrax reported in England for the years in question is:

1985: 1

1986: 7

1987: 3

1988: 3

1989: 3

1990: 3

1991: 1

1992: 1

1993: 1

1994: 3

NATIONAL HERITAGE

VAT (Accommodation)

Mr. Pendry: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage what plans he has to press for a reduction in value added tax rates in the accommodation sector, following the report by McKinsey Inc.

Mr. Dorrell: The McKinsey study concluded that the effect of a reduction in VAT on our tourism revenues would be uncertain. It is not clear that taxation places our operators at a competitive disadvantage without comparing the total tax burden on them with that carried by their European competitors, who have to bear the costs of the social chapter; and it is not clear that the benefits of a VAT reduction would be passed on to customers. I intend to help the accommodation sector improve value for money by means of the measures I announced on 1 March.

Children's Play

Mr. Pendry: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage how many responses he received with regard to the restructuring of children's play, showing (a) the total number of responses, (b) the number of responses, (i) in


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favour of creating a national body and (ii) opposing the creation of a new national body and (c) the number of responses (1) in favour of extending national lottery funding to children's play activities and (2) opposing the extension of national lottery funding to children's play activities.

Mr. Dorrell: The Department has received a total of 135 responses regarding future arrangements for children's play. Sixty-five of the individuals and organisations which responded were in favour of the creation of a national body and 24 were in favour of children's play activities being eligible for national lottery funding. None of the responses opposed either of these ideas.

English Heritage Commission

Mr. Chris Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage, pursuant to his answer of 20 December, Official Report , column 1165 , who replaced Sir Hugh Cubitt when his appointment as a member of the English Heritage Commission ended on 31 December; and if regard was given in making this appointment, to the desirability of at least one member of this commission having knowledge of local government.

Mr. Dorrell: I am currently considering new appointments to the English Heritage Commission, including a replacement for Sir Hugh Cubitt, and will give due regard to the desirability of at least one member having knowledge of local government when making these appointments.

Cultural Property Ownership

Sir John Gorst: To ask the Secretary of State for National Heritage if he will make a statement about the negotiations to be held next June in Rome when the final draft of a treaty on cultural property ownership will be considered; and what is his assessment of their effect on the buying and selling of antiquities in the United Kingdom.

Mr. Dorrell [holding answer 9 March 1995]: I can confirm that there will be a diplomatic conference in Rome from 7 to 24 June this year, to discuss the draft Unidroit convention on the international return of stolen or illegally exported cultural objects. It is our present intention that the UK will be represented. As the convention will be subject to further amendment at the conference, I cannot anticipate whether the UK will become a signatory or what effect its provision might have on the buying and selling of antiquities in the United Kingdom.

LORD CHANCELLOR'S DEPARTMENT

Tranquilliser Addiction

Mr. Pickthall: To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department what plans he has to provide legal aid to help people addicted to tranquillisers to pursue their cases against drug companies.

Mr. John M. Taylor: Civil legal aid is available for almost all proceedings through the courts of England and Wales, subject to tests as to the means of the applicant,


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and the merits of his or her case. Decisions on the grant or refusal of civil legal aid are taken by the Legal Aid Board, and I cannot intervene in its decisions.

Mr. Pickthall: To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Lord Chancellor's Department how many cases are currently being pursued in the courts by people addicted to tranquillisers against drug companies.

Mr. John M. Taylor: The information requested is not available centrally.

FOREIGN AND COMMONWEALTH AFFAIRS

Former Prisoners of War

Mr. Alfred Morris: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what backing Her Majesty's Ambassador in Tokyo gave to former British prisoners of war of the Japanese when they visited Japan recently to claim compensation for their treatment and that of other prisoners of the Japanese in the second world war.

Mr. Goodlad: The Ambassador met and briefed the former prisoners during their visit to Japan. He helped them to meet a representative of the Japanese Government and to pay tribute to their fallen comrades at the Commonwealth war graves cemetery.

Lockerbie

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will define what he means by the word "dud" in his reply to the Adjournment debate on 1 February, referring to a document of air intelligence unit of the US air force in relation to payment by Ali Akbar Mostashemi to terrorist groups for a contract to bomb an airliner.

Mr. Douglas Hogg: When the report in question was assessed, it was found to be no more than an unsubstantiated rumour of no intelligence value.

Mr. Dalyell: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will submit to the Committee on Intelligence the transcripts of conversations, in 1988, between Iranian Government officials recording their satisfaction with the Lockerbie explosion.

Mr. Douglas Hogg: As the hon. Gentleman knows, we do not comment on such matters.

Embassy, Berlin

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what plans he has to develop the British embassy in Berlin; what is the estimated value of the present site; what is the projected cost of the redevelopment work; how many staff will be employed in the embassy; how much office space, residential accommodation and what recreational and restaurant facilities will be provided; and if he will make a statement.

Mr. Goodlad: We own the site of the former embassy in Berlin, destroyed during world war two. Its value is estimated at £11 million. The cost of construction of a new building on that site together with the cost of an adjoining site which is being acquired, is estimated at £21


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million. This will enable a fully functioning embassy to be built and provide office accommodation for 80 UK- based and 80 local staff. No residential accommodation will be built. A staff canteen, recreation room and library will be provided. Conference and exhibition facilities will also be provided for use by British exporters and other organisations.

Mr. Byers: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what sites were considered for the new British embassy in Berlin; who made the decision on the site and on what advice; what provisional arrangements will be made and at what cost to ensure the effective continuation of the embassy's work during the period of redevelopment; and for how long it is expected to last.

Mr. Goodlad: Various possibilities were considered for the establishment of a new embassy in Berlin. The most cost-effective option was chosen. The decision we took was to construct a new building on a site we already part owned.

The work of the British embassy will continue in Bonn and at the present British embassy, Berlin office, at 32/34 Unter den Linden, until the opening of the new building, planned for early 1999, when staff will be transferred.

Social Development Summit

Mr. Sweeney: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs if he will make a statement on the world summit for social development which was held in Copenhagen from 6 to 12 March.

Mr. Douglas Hogg: The world summit for social development provided an opportunity for discussion of the key development issues of poverty reduction, job creation and improving social cohesion, and for ideas to be shared at a high level on how these problems might be overcome. My right hon. and noble Friend Baroness Chalker of Wallasey represented the Government and made a keynote speech setting out the Government's good record on tackling problems of poverty and unemployment at home, and our support through the aid programme for developing countries' efforts to achieve sustainable people-centred development

The Government are pleased that the summit's documentation includes strong references to human rights, good governance, developing country debt, trade liberalisation and the need for economic growth.

EDUCATION

Local Education Authority Budgets

Mr. Steinberg: To ask the Secretary of State for Education if she will list for each local education authority budgeted spending for 1995 96.

Mr. Robin Squire: Information on local authorities' budgets for 1995 96 will become available centrally later in the year.

Mr. Butcher: To ask the Secretary of State for Education (1) what is the average level of hold-back from local education authority educational budgets for local authorities controlled by (a) Conservative, (b) Labour and (c) Liberal Democrat

administrations;


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