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Ms Harman: To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will publish the full terms of employment as specified to employees in his Department and all executive agencies for which he is responsible who are employed on a temporary contract of (a) 51 weeks or (b) less than 51 weeks' duration.

Mr. Ian Taylor [holding answer 15 March 1995]: Several types of temporary appointment are permissable under the civil service Order in Council. The two types mainly in use in the DTI are the fixed-term appointment and the casual appointment. The full terms of employment offered are in accordance with the guidance issued by the Civil Service Commissioners and are set out in a letter of appointment and associated schedule, and the "Staff Handbook"--"The Guide". The letters of appointment and associated schedules for both types of appointment, together with a copy of "The Guide", have been placed in the Library of the House.

Ms Harman: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what guidance has been issued in respect of the recruitment and appointment of non- permanent employees in (a) his Department and (b) all executive agencies supervised by his Department.

Mr. Ian Taylor [holding answer 15 March 1995]: The DTI and its agencies are required to follow recruitment principles set out in the civil service management code and the civil service Order in Council. The DTI guidance on the recruitment of non-permanent employees is based on these principles, and supplementary guidance which is issued from time to time by the Civil Service Commissioners.

Ms Harman: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what positions in (i) his Department and (ii) all executive agencies for which his Department is responsible are filled by employees who are employed on temporary contracts of (a) 51 weeks or (b) less than 51 weeks' duration.

Mr. Ian Taylor [holding answer 15 March 1995]: The information in precisely the form requested by the hon. Member is not readily available. Those staff employed on temporary contracts in both the Department and its agencies are mainly used in the junior administrative grades.


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Motor Manufacturing

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what has been the net loss of employment in the motor manufacturing industry as a result of the establishment of Japanese car plants in the United Kingdom; and what was the cost to public funds in grants and subsidies and in supporting those made unemployed.

Mr. Eggar: The United Kingdom has successfully attracted £3.5 billion of investment from Japanese car manufacturers which have established plants here since 1986. This has directly created 9,500 jobs and is generating £1.5 billion a year in additional component procurement in the UK and continental Europe. It has also made a major contribution to improving quality, productivity and competitiveness across the industry. The Government assistance provided was limited to £125 million to Nissan to establish and expand its Sunderland plant.

The United Kingdom is now the most rapidly expanding car manufacturing base in Europe with significant new investments announced in the last year by the major vehicle manufacturers. The recent announcement by Toyota of the expansion of its Burnaston plant is an important example of this. There has been a net loss of 27,000 jobs in the motor vehicles and parts sector since 1986 which reflects underlying improvements in competitiveness and the introduction of lean manufacturing techniques. It is not possible to determine the impact of these changes on the numbers unemployed and the associated costs to public funds.

Coal Subsidies

Mrs. Peacock: To ask the President of the Board of Trade what amount of subsidy has been paid to the coal industry since the White Paper "Prospects for Coal" was published; and to which mine each subsidy applied.

Mr. Eggar [holding answer 16 March 1995]: Since the publication of the White Paper "Prospects for Coal", subsidy paid to the coal industry under the Industrial Development Act 1982 amounts to about £9 million. Payments are in respect of Ellington, Monktonhall, Blenkinsopp, Lyn Clipstone, Rossington, Hem Heath and Markham Main. A further £1,650 million of financial assistance for the coal industry has been paid under the Coal Industry Acts.

Cable Television Franchises

Mr. David Shaw: To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will list for each cable television area (a) the company awarded the franchise, (b) the date cabling commenced or the current expected date of commencement, (c) the number of homes in the franchise area and (d) the number of homes cabled to date.

Mr. Ian Taylor: I am writing to the hon. Member and will place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

Murvi Motorcaravans Ltd.

Mr. Steen: To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will ensure that the application from Murvi Motorcaravans Ltd., which he received on 14 March, for regional selective assistance receives immediate attention.

Mr. Page: The application for regional selective assistance from Murvi Motorcaravans Ltd. is currently


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being appraised within the Government office for the south-west as quickly as resources permit.

HOME DEPARTMENT

Identity Cards

Mr. Gale: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) if he will make available as an alternative travel document to the British visitor's passport a United Kingdom identity card officially recognised throughout the European Union;

(2) when he will publish a Green Paper containing proposals for the introduction of a United Kingdom identity card.

Mr. Nicholas Baker: We intend publishing, later in the spring, a Green Paper on identity cards. This will set out and canvass views on the possible options for a national identity card scheme, including the use of a United Kingdom identity card as a travel document within the European Union.

Wandsworth Prison

Mr. Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give the dates in each of the last three years when an inmate in Wandsworth prison has (a) committed suicide and (b) sought to commit suicide and has needed hospital care.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Tox Cox, dated 17 March 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking the dates in each of the last three years when an inmate in Wandsworth has committed suicide or attempted to commit suicide. There were no suicides in 1992, although five attempts were made.

Two prisoners killed themselves in 1993, one on 5 December and one on 8 December. In this year there were nineteen unsuccessful attempts at suicide.

In 1994 there were two deaths recorded as being death by misadventure, on 17 July and 2 November, and two suicides on 26 July and 20 November. There were 43 suicides attempts in this year. Information on the dates of the suicide attempts is not readily available and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Prison Security Reclassifications

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many security reclassifications have occurred for each category of prisoner in each of the past five years.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Doug Hoyle, dated 17 March 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the number of security re-classifications of prisoners which have occurred for each category in each of the past five years. Re-categorisations from Category B to C and from C to D are the responsibility of Governors of prisons and no central records are


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kept. I regret, therefore, that the information requested about this group of prisoners is not available.

The relevant information about prisoners re-categorised from A to B is as follows:


Year   |Number       

---------------------

1990   |78           

1991   |85           

1992   |56           

1993   |51           

1994   |25           

Prisons (Young Offenders)

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been the number of


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receptions into Prison Service custody of 15 -year-old (a) girls and (b) boys; how many were (i) on remand and (ii) sentenced; and in respect of what offences they were committed, in each year since 1990.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking what has been the number of receptions into Prison Service custody of 15 year old (a) girls and (b) boys; how many were (i) on remand and (ii) sentenced; and in respect of what offences they were committed, in each year since 1990.

The information requested for Prison Service establishments is given in the attached tables.


Receptions of 15-year-old remanded persons<1> into Prison Service establishments, England and Wales by offence 1990 to 1994<2>    

                                                                              |Other                                              

             |Violence                                                        |offences                                           

             |against the                                        |Theft and   |including   |Offence not                           

             |person      |Sex offences|Burglary    |Robbery     |handling    |drugs       |recorded    |Total                    

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Males                                                                                                                             

1990<3>      |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |380                      

1991<3>      |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |412                      

1992         |46          |8           |136         |39          |77          |46          |25          |377                      

1993         |51          |6           |137         |63          |131         |52          |13          |453                      

1994         |63          |10          |184         |102         |178         |76          |15          |628                      

                                                                                                                                  

Females                                                                                                                           

1990<3>      |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |0                        

1991<3>      |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |-           |2                        

1992         |0           |0           |0           |0           |0           |0           |0           |0                        

1993         |0           |0           |0           |1           |0           |0           |0           |1                        

1994         |0           |0           |0           |0           |0           |0           |0           |0                        

<1> Aged 15 years as at date of remand.                                                                                           

<2> 1993 and 1994 information is provisional.                                                                                     

<3> Information for remand prisoners by offence is not available for 1990 and 1991.                                               


Receptions of sentenced 15-year-old persons<1> into Prison Service establishments, England and Wales by offence 1990 to 1994<2>   

                                                                              |Other                                              

             |Violence                                                        |offences                                           

             |against the                                        |Theft and   |including   |Offence not                           

             |person      |Sex offences|Burglary    |Robbery     |handling    |drugs       |recorded    |Total                    

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Males                                                                                                                             

1990         |27          |12          |151         |26          |83          |53          |84          |436                      

1991         |27          |5           |156         |24          |119         |83          |95          |509                      

1992         |39          |3           |152         |42          |98          |93          |35          |465                      

1993         |45          |9           |201         |61          |151         |66          |16          |549                      

1994         |69          |5           |261         |77          |191         |85          |21          |709                      

                                                                                                                                  

Females                                                                                                                           

1990         |0           |0           |1           |4           |0           |2           |4           |11                       

1991         |0           |0           |4           |1           |3           |1           |3           |12                       

1992         |0           |0           |2           |3           |1           |0           |0           |6                        

1993         |10          |0           |0           |6           |5           |4           |0           |25                       

1994         |10          |0           |5           |5           |6           |3           |2           |31                       

<1> Aged 15 years as at date of sentence. Excluding those committed in default of payment of a fine.                              

<2> 1993 and 1994 information is provisional.                                                                                     

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which Prison Service institutions have held 15-year-olds boys and girls in (a) 1994 and (b) 1995 to date.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.


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Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995 :

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question asking which prison service institutions have held 15 year old boys and girls in (a) 1994 and (b) 1995 to date.

The readily available information relates to the populations of 15 years olds, in boys and girls prison service establishment on 30 June 1994 and 31 January 1995, and it is given in the attached tables. A copy of these tables has been placed in the House of Commons Library.


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Prison Escort Services

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what percentage of (a) privately managed (b) police and (c) Prison Service escorts are carried out in secure cellular vehicles for the latest dates for which figures are available;

(2) what percentage of (a) Group 4's prisoners' escorts and (b) Prison Service escorts are transported in secure vehicles; (3) how many prison escapes have occurred in the Metropolitan area since Securicor commenced escort services there;

(4) what are the number of prisoner movements for each escort area in the last five years.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for these matters has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Doug Hoyle, dated 17 March 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Questions about prisoner escorts.

Information on the number of prisoner escorts for each escort area in the last five years is either not available or could only be obtained at disproportionate cost. Neither the Prison Service nor the police record it centrally. The limited information which is readily available relates to those areas where court escort and custody services have been contracted out and is given below.

In Area 7 (East Midlands and Humberside) there were approximately 100,000 prisoner movements in 1993 94 and there have been approximately 107,000 such movements until 28 February in this financial year. A prisoner movement is defined as either the escorting of a prisoner from a prison or police station to court or from court to his place of custody. In Area 3 (the Metropolitan Police District) Securicor conducted approximately 57,000 prisoner escort movements between 27 June 1994, when they began operating, and 28 February 1995, although this does not represent all of the movements in the area.

In Areas 4 (East Anglia) and 6 (Merseyside), Greater Manchester and North Wales) contracts have been awarded to Group 4 for the provision of prisoner escort services for operation from July this year. Special exercises were conducted in 1994 to establish the likely number of prisoner movements the contractor would have to manage. These produced estimates of approximately 95,000 prisoner movements in Area 4 and 201,000 in Area 6 each year.


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Information on the percentage of prisoner escorts conducted in secure, including cellular, vehicles is not recorded by the police and prison services. Again, the only information available relates to privately managed prisoner escorts.

It is the general policy of contractors to transport all prisoners in cellular vehicles except where special circumstances apply, for example where the prisoner is heavily pregnant or a nursing mother or disabled. In Area 3 Securicor have conducted 98.3 per cent of prisoner escorts using cellular vehicles and in Area 7 Group 4 estimate over 99 per cent of such escorts have been in cellular vehicles.

Since Securicor began managing prisoner escorts in Greater London in June 1994 there have been two escapes from their custody. This compares with 16 in 1993 under the previous arrangements. The two figures are not directly comparable because the contract with Securicor is being phased in and will not be fully operational until June this year. Nevertheless, the figures so far indicate their performance will be better.

Prison Workshops

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many (a) workshop and (b) education places there were in the Prison Service in each of the last 15 years broken down by prison population in each year;

(2) how many workshop places were available for prisoners in each of the last 15 years broken down by the number of places per prison population.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for these matters has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service. I have asked him to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Doug Hoyle, dated 17 March 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Questions about the number of workshop and education places at Prison Service establishments in each of the last 15 years.

There is no fixed allocation of places for prisoners to attend education classes. The number of prisoners able to attend full-time or part time education courses is determined according to need. In addition to classroom based teaching there is also tuition for prisoners at other locations, such as in the prison hospital, and teaching staff provide support to prisoners undertaking private study.

Information on work places for prisoners in industries and farms is available only from 1987, and from 1988 for vocational training places. This information is given in the attached table, a copy of which has been placed in the House of Commons library.


                                         Employment places                                                                                                      

                    |Average                                                                        |places, industries,                                        

                    |population in                                                                  |farms and          |Total places as                        

                    |prison service                                             |Vocational         |vocational         |percentage of                          

                    |establishments     |Industries         |Farms              |training courses   |training           |prison population                      

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1987                |48,426             |12,981             |3,637              |Not available      |16,618             |34.3                                   

1988                |48,872             |11,848             |3,706              |1,942              |17,496             |35.8                                   

1989                |48,500             |12,173             |3,817              |1,932              |17,922             |37.0                                   

1990                |44,975             |11,898             |3,609              |2,187              |17,694             |39.3                                   

1991                |44,809             |11,143             |3,523              |2,519              |17,185             |38.4                                   

1992                |44,719             |11,003             |3,474              |2,589              |17,066             |38.2                                   

1993                |44,551             |10,026             |3,508              |2,608              |16,142             |36.2                                   

1994                |48,621             |10,024             |3,508              |2,597              |16,129             |33.2                                   

Prison Operating Costs

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what is the current net operating cost per prisoner place in (a) local prisons and remand centres, (b) contracted-out prisons, (c) dispersal prisons, (d) category B training prisons, (e) category C


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training prisons, (f) adult male open prisons, (g) young offender closed establishments, (h) young offender open establishments, (i) young offenders remand establishments, (j) female establishments and (k) non-operational establishments; what is the net headquarters operating cost, and, when this figure is added to the above establishments costs, what is the net operating cost per prisoner place before exceptional items for the Prison Service in England and Wales from 1 April 1994 to 31 March 1995; (2) what is the net operating cost per prisoner place per annum for each of the local prisons and remand centres, excluding the contracted-out prisons, in England and Wales from 1 April 1994 to 31 March 1995.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for these matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Questions on net operating costs.

Figures for 1994 95 will be published later this year in the Prison Service Annual Report for 1994 95. Figures for 1993 94 have been published in section A of Part Two of the Prison Service Annual Report and Accounts, a copy of which is in the House of Commons Library.

Prison Escapes

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what was the number of escapes from prison establishments and from prison escorts for each of the local prisons and remand centres, excluding contracted-out prisons, in England and Wales from 1 April 1994 to 31 March 1995.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the number of escapes from prison establishments and prison escorts for each of the local prisons and remand centres, excluding contracted out prisons, in England and Wales from 1 April 1994 to 31 March 1995.

The attached table shows the information requested from 1 April 1994 to 9 March 1995 inclusive, for those establishments where escapes occurred. A copy of this table has been placed in the House of Commons Library.


Establishment |Number                     

------------------------------------------

Bedford       |2                          

Birmingham    |1                          

Brixton       |1                          

Chelmsford    |1                          

Durham        |4                          

Elmley        |1                          

Exeter        |1                          

Gloucester    |1                          

Holme House   |2                          

Hull          |1                          

Leicester     |1                          

Lewes         |1                          

Lincoln       |2                          

Liverpool     |2                          

Manchester    |1                          

Norwich       |2                          

Pentonville   |2                          

Preston       |1                          

Shrewsbury    |1                          

Swansea       |4                          

Wandsworth    |1                          

Brinsford     |3                          

Hindley       |1                          

Rochester     |2                          

                                          

Total         |39                         

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been the number of total escapes from prison establishments and from escorts since 1 April 1994 from (a) local prison and remand centres contracted out, (b) prisons, (c) dispersals, (d) category B training prisons, (e) category C training prisons, (f) adult male open prisons, (g) young offender closed establishments, (h) young offender open establishments and (g) female establishments.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995 :

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the number of total escapes from Prison Service establishments and from escorts since 1 April 1994.

The information is given in the following table for the period 1 April 1994 to 9 March 1995 inclusive.


                                     |Escapes        

-----------------------------------------------------

Local Prisons/Remand Centres         |39             

Contracted Out Prisons               |1              

Dispersals                           |9              

Category B Training Prisons          |5              

Category C Training Prisons          |104            

Adult Male Open Prisons              |0              

Young Offender Closed Establishments |27             

Young Offender Open Establishments   |0              

Female Establishments                |11             

                                                     

Total                                |<1>196         

<1> This figure excludes 15 escapes from escort that 

were previously the responsibility of the police and 

are now the responsibility of private contractors.   

Prison Officers (Time Off)

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many hours were owed to prison officers under the time off in lieu scheme in total and for each prison in England and Wales for (a) the latest date available, (b) six months ago, (c) 12 months ago, (d) 18 months ago and (e) two years ago.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Doug Hoyle, dated 17 March 1995 : The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about how many hours were owed to prison officers under the TOIL scheme in total and for each prison at different times in the past two years.


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The information is not available centrally in precisely the form requested and could be collated only at disproportionate cost. However, a survey was completed recently, covering a similar period and the figures from it, which are provisional, have been included in the attached table, a copy of which has been placed in the House of Commons Library.

Prisons (Assaults)

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many offences relating to assaults proved in disciplinary proceedings, including attempted assaults, incitement and assisting other prisoners in assault excluding criminal proceedings relating to assaults took place in each local prison and remand centre excluding contracted-out prisons in England and Wales since 1 April 1994; and how many took place in (a) local prisons and remand centres, contracted out, (b) prisons, (c) dispersals, (d) category B training prisons, (e) category C training prisons, (f) adult male open prisons, (g) young offender closed establishments, (h) young offender open establishments and (i) female establishments.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the number of proved offences of assault at disciplinary proceedings since 1 April 1994.

The enclosed tables give the number of assaults for each non-contracted out local prison and remand centre and the total number of assaults by type of Prison Service establishment. A copy of these tables has been placed in the House of Commons Library.


Table 1: Assaults proved at       

adjudication<1>                   

April 1994-February 1995<2>:      

Remand Centres and Local          

Prisons<3>                        

                |Assaults         

----------------------------------

Remand centres  |844              

Brinsford       |102              

Cardiff         |18               

Dorchester      |1                

Exeter          |20               

Feltham         |130              

Glen Parva      |91               

Gloucester      |23               

Hindley         |65               

Lancaster Farms |48               

Low Newton      |42               

Moorland        |80               

Northallerton   |37               

Norwich         |12               

Reading         |43               

Rochester       |61               

Stoke Heath     |24               

Swansea         |21               

Wood Hill       |26               

                                  

Local prisons   |1,654            

Bedford         |26               

Belmarsh        |94               

Birmingham      |88               

Bristol         |28               

Brixton         |76               

Bullingdon      |54               

Camp Hill       |-                

Canterbury      |11               

Cardiff         |37               

Chelmsford      |36               

Dorchester      |4                

Durham          |36               

Elmley          |49               

Exeter          |13               

Gloucester      |13               

Highdown        |65               

Holme House     |35               

Hull            |91               

Leeds           |136              

Leicester       |42               

Lewes           |29               

Lincoln         |39               

Liverpool       |69               

Manchester      |64               

Norwich         |38               

Pentonville     |86               

Preston         |56               

Shrewsbury      |30               

Swansea         |12               

Wandsworth      |134              

Winchester      |36               

Wood Hill       |73               

Wormwood Scrubs |54               

<1> Includes attempt, incite or   

assist in an assault.<2>          

Provisional figures.              

<3> Excludes contracted-out       

establishments (Blakenhurst,      

Doncaster, Wolds).                


Table 2: Assaults proved at adjudication<1>                        

April 1994-February 1995<2>: By type of establishment              

                                                                   

-------------------------------------------------------------------

All Prison Service Establishments                      |5,190      

Males                                                              

Contracted-out local prisons and remand centres<3>     |309        

Non-contracted-out local prisons and remand centres<4> |2,498      

Dispersal prisons                                      |312        

Category B training prisons                            |222        

Category C training prisons                            |503        

Open Prisons                                           |18         

Closed Young Offender Institutions                     |621        

Open Young Offender Institutions                       |34         

Juvenile Young Offender Institutions                   |264        

                                                                   

Females                                                            

Female Establishments                                  |409        

<1> Includes attempt, incite or assist in an assault.<2>           

Provisional figures.                                               

<3> Contracted-out establishments: Blakenhurst, Doncaster, Wolds.  

<4> Excludes Blackenhurst, Doncaster, Wolds.                       

Super-prisons

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to develop a super-prison along the lines of Oak Park Heights in Minnesota USA.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Doug Hoyle, dated 17 March 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question on what plans there are to develop a super-prison along the lines of Oak Park Heights in Minnesota, USA.

The new prison building programme includes no plans to develop a super- prison along the lines of Oak Park Heights in Minnesota, USA.


Column 761

Prison Officers' Training

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many weeks basic training is given to (a) prison officers and (b) prison custody officers.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. Doug Hoyle, dated 17 March 1995: The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about how many weeks basic training is given to (a) prison officers and (b) prisoner custody officers.

The basic training of prison officers (ie those who work at directly managed prisons) consists of nine weeks (256 hours) residential initial training at the Prison Service College. In addition, there is two weeks before and two weeks after the formal training, which is spent at their parent establishment in observation and induction.

Under the Criminal Justice Act 1991, prisoner custody officers (PCOs) may be certificated either for custodial duties at a prison or for escort functions, or both. The minimum training required for escort PCOs is 234 hours, and for custodial PCOs 269. This excludes company induction and on the job training (the equivalent of the 4 weeks observation and induction training for prison officers).

Prison Overcrowding

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what has been the average percentage overcrowding in each local prison and remand centre in England and Wales since 1 April 1994 on the basis of the methodology as applied within section B performance statistics of the Prison Service annual report and accounts for 1 April 1993 to 31 March 1994.

Mr. Michael Forsyth: Responsibility for this matter has been delegated to the Director General of the Prison Service, who has been asked to arrange for a reply to be given.

Letter from Derek Lewis to Mr. George Howarth, dated 17 March 1995:

The Home Secretary has asked me to reply to your recent Question about the average percentage overcrowding in each local prison and remand centre in England and Wales since 1st April 1994. The statistics have been calculated using the methodology applied within Section B performance statistics of the Prison Service Annual Report and Accounts for 1st April 1993 to 31st March 1994.

The information requested is given in the attached table, a copy of which has been placed in the House of Commons Library.


Average Percentage Overcrowding in each     

Local Prison and                            

Remand Centre in England and Wales          

over the Period 1 April 1994 to 17 February 

1995                                        

Local Prisons   |Per cent.                  

--------------------------------------------

Bedford         |7                          

Belmarsh        |-                          

Birmingham      |40                         

Blakenhurst     |-                          

Bristol         |6                          

Brixton         |24                         

Bullingdon      |6                          

Canterbury      |41                         

Cardiff         |30                         

Chelmsford      |54                         

Doncaster       |-                          

Dorchester      |45                         

Durham          |59                         

Elmley          |-                          

Exeter          |52                         

Gloucester      |32                         

Highdown        |-                          

Holme House     |-                          

Hull            |25                         

Leeds           |28                         

Leicester       |76                         

Lewes           |16                         

Lincoln         |38                         

Liverpool       |25                         

Manchester      |13                         

Norwich         |14                         

Pentonville     |29                         

Preston         |35                         

Shrewsbury      |64                         

Swansea         |29                         

Wandsworth      |3                          

Winchester      |18                         

Wolds           |-                          

Woodhill        |1                          

Wormwood Scrubs |29                         

                                            

Remand Centres                              

Brinsford       |11                         

Cardiff         |23                         

Doncaster       |-                          

Dorchester      |46                         

Exeter          |14                         

Feltham         |-                          

Glen Parva      |44                         

Gloucester      |-                          

Hindley         |-                          

Lancaster Farms |-                          

Low Newton      |19                         

Northallerton   |12                         

Norwich         |-                          

Reading         |-                          

Rochester       |-                          

Stoke Heath     |-                          

Swansea         |-                          

Woodhill        |12                         

Prisons (Drugs)

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners have been adjudicated against for possession of drugs in each of the past five years.


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