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Mr. Page [holding answer 21 June 1995]: The number of businesses stated up in Great Britain is available from 1988 onwards and given in the table. Almost all business start-ups are small. Information on start-ups by gender is not available for each year in the table. Research carried out for Barclays bank suggests that of the businesses started up in 1994, nearly three out of 10 were started by women.

The best guide to trends in the number of businesses started up by region is given by registrations for VAT. Copies of "VAT Registrations and Deregistrations, County and District Analyses "1980 1991", and "VAT Registrations and Deregistrations, County and District Analyses 1992 1993" are in the Library of the House.


Number of business start-ups        

1988-1994 in Great Britain          

            |Starts                 

Year        |(thousands)            

------------------------------------

1988        |422                    

1989        |447                    

1990        |444                    

1991        |374                    

1992        |364                    

1993        |405                    

1994        |446                    

Source: Barclays Economics          

Department.                         

Ms Primarolo: To ask the President of the Board of Trade how many people were employed by (a) small businesses and (b) medium-sized businesses in each of the last 10 years; and if he will break these figures down by region and gender.     [29565]

Mr. Page [holding answer 21 June 1995]: The number of people employed in businesses of different sizes are given in the table below. The figures are available for some of the last 10 years only. Although there is no official definition of what constitutes a small firm, the usual practice in statistical analyses is to consider firms with fewer than 100 employees small, and those with between 100 and 499 employees medium sized. There is no breakdown of these figures by region or gender.


Number employed by size of business, UK 1986-1991, thousands      

           |Small     |Medium    |Large                           

           |(under 100|(100-499  |(500+                           

Year       |employees)|employees)|employees)|All                  

------------------------------------------------------------------

1986       |9,600     |3,300     |6,900     |19,800               

                                                                  

1988       |10,400    |3,600     |7,200     |21,300               

1989       |11,300    |3,300     |7,300     |21,900               

1990       |11,100    |3,600     |7,000     |21,700               

1991       |10,500    |3,400     |6,700     |20,600               

Source: NatWest Review of Small Business Trends, June 1993, June  

1994.                                                             

Ms Primarolo: To ask the President of the Board of Trade which sectors of the economy (a) small businesses and (b) medium-sized businesses are predominantly to be found.     [29566]


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Mr. Page [holding answer 21 June 1995]: The numbers of businesses of different sizes in each industry division are given in the table. Although there is no official definition of what constitutes a small firm, the usual practice in statistical analyses is to consider firms with fewer than 100 employees small; and those with between 100 and 499 employees medium sized.


Number of businesses by employee size class by sector, 1991            

UK, number of businesses                                               

                |Small     |Medium    |Large                           

Industry        |(under 100|(100-499  |(500+                           

(SIC80)         |employees)|employees)|employees)|All                  

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

All sectors<1>  |2,505,463 |16,090    |2,753     |2,524,306            

Energy and                                                             

  water supply  |2,432     |104       |67        |2,603                

Extraction      |15,477    |498       |209       |16,184               

Metal                                                                  

  manufacture   |95,353    |1,739     |470       |97,562               

Other                                                                  

  manufacturing |175,853   |1,739     |474       |178,066              

Construction    |541,646   |664       |123       |542,433              

Distribution,                                                          

  hotels and                                                           

  catering      |654,123   |6,721     |567       |661,411              

Transport and                                                          

  communication |146,042   |650       |90        |146,782              

Banking and                                                            

  finance       |377,351   |1,617     |450       |379,418              

Other services  |497,186   |2,358     |303       |499,847              

<1> Excludes Agriculture, forestry and fishing.                        

Source: Enterprises in Europe, Third Report.                           

Crown Immunity

Mr. Foulkes: To ask the President of the Board of Trade if he will list all areas within (a) his Department, (b) agencies under his Department's control and (c) organisations for which he has ministerial responsibility to which Crown immunity applies; what consideration he has given to removing this; and if he will make a statement.     [28658]

Mr. Heseltine [holding answer 15 June 1995]: An Act of Parliament is presumed not to bind the Crown unless the contrary intention is clearly stated, or there is a necessary implication that the Crown is to be bound. Ministers and civil servants will not necessarily share the Crown's immunity from criminal prosecution. The Government's policy on Crown immunity, as set out in CM1599--"The Citizen's Charter--Raising the Standard"--is that Crown immunity is being progressively reduced, as legislative opportunities arise. In the meantime, Crown bodies are expected to behave as though they were bound by regulations.

Detailed information on the circumstances where Crown immunity does not apply is not held centrally, and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

DEFENCE

Executive Agencies

Mr. Jim Marshall: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement about defence agency status for the Defence Codification Authority.     [30865]

Mr. Soames: The Defence Codification Authority is part of RAF Logistics Command, and is responsible for the information and direction of MOD codification policy,


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and the sponsorship and control of codification quality assurance services. It has been decided that the authority is to be considered for defence agency status under the next steps procedures. An entry to this effect will appear in the July 1995 edition of the "Market Testing Bulletin."

Mr. Marshall: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what key performance targets have been set for the chief executive of the Meteorological Office executive agency for the financial year 1995 96.     [30866]

Mr. Soames: The agency has been set a range of quality, financial and efficiency targets to ensure that it delivers progressive improvements in the provision of weather-related services. In addition, the agency is to achieve trading fund status on 1 April 1996.

The key quality targets set for the Meteorological Office during the financial year 1995 96 are to achieve 80 per cent. of the designated business plan external targets for customer satisfaction, forecast accuracy and timeliness; and to attain an average accuracy over the United Kingdom of at least 84 per cent. for the 24-hour national weather forecasts broadcast at 17.55 hours by BBC Radio 4. The financial targets are to deliver the agreed Meteorological Office programme within a business plan cash limit of £78,300,000; to reduce net expenditure, as shown in the annual report and accounts, to £90,300,000, representing a decrease of 2.6 per cent. on the 1994 95 budget, both at 1994 95 prices; and to provide a net contribution to the agency's core costs and general overheads of £3,800,000 from commercial services to the public, industry and commerce excluding the Civil Aviation Authority and the Department of the Environment. Individual areas of the Meteorological Office have been set targets to increase efficiency by between 1 and 3 per cent. mainly through improvements in quality and volume of services and reduced unit output costs.

Training Land

Mr. McFall: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will list the areas of land in Scotland not owned or leased by his Department, which are currently available to the armed services for training under licence agreements with the owners.     [29073]

Mr. Soames: At present, there are 12 areas of land in Scotland where my Department holds military training rights under licence agreements. These are as follows:

Binn Hill, Perthshire

Blair Adam (Tayside)

Galloway

Kinlochleven (Lochaber)

Tighnablair (Tayside)

Hopsprigg (Dumfries and Galloway)

Castle Kennedy (Stranraer)

Ardgarten (Strathclyde)

Balduff (Tayside)

Tullymurdoch (Tayside)

Fyall Farm (Tayside)

Blackhall (Tayside)


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In addition, there are other areas of land where my Department has agreements with private landowners to cover specific short-term requirements. In the last financial year, there were 356 such agreements.

Environmental Information

Mr. McFall: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many applications for information have been made to his Department under the environmental information resolutions since their entry into force; what was the total number of different applicants making the applications; in how many of these cases information was provided; what was the average total assessed cost of meeting each application; and what was the average cost charged to the applicant.     [29082]

Mr. Soames: We have received six such requests for information since the regulations came into effect, and information has been provided in each case. The cost incurred by my Department in meeting the applications has amounted to less than £50 in each case. No charges have been levied for the information that has been provided, though in one case a request for more detailed information was withdrawn after a warning of charges.

Chinook Crash, 2 June 1994

Mr. John D. Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what was the date of the Chinook helicopter disaster at the Mull of Kintrye, Scotland; how many military police and civilian personnel lost their lives in this disaster; what compensation has been paid to the families of the victims; when he expects payment of compensation to be completed; and if he will make a statement about the basis of compensation to be paid to the dependants of those killed.     [28982]

Mr. Soames: Twenty nine people were killed in this tragic accident on 2 June 1994. The position on compensation was explained in the answer given to my hon. Friend the Member for Tayside, North (Mr. Walker) by my right hon. and learned Friend the Secretary of State for Defence on 15 June, Official Report, column 597 .

Low Flying

Mr. Wigley: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many low- flying incidents were reported in (a) Wales, (b) England, (c) Scotland, (d) Northern Ireland and (e) the United Kingdom in each of the last three years.     [28482]

Mr. Soames: The number of inquiries and complaints received by my Department about military low flying in each of the last three years are as follows:


                                        |<1>United          

Year      |England  |Wales    |Scotland |Kingdom            

------------------------------------------------------------

1992      |4,401    |904      |990      |6,295              

1993      |4,141    |556      |1,041    |5,738              

1994      |4,072    |617      |1,089    |5,778              

<1> The figure for the United Kingdom excludes Northern     

Ireland where most low flying is of an operational nature,  

with only a limited number of training sorties. Complaints  

arising from this activity are dealt with locally, and no   

central record is available of the number received.         

Mr. Wigley: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what measures his Department has taken to monitor and deal with incidents of low flying by military aircraft; and if he will make a statement.     [28483]

Mr. Soames: All complaints and inquiries about military low flying are recorded and examined and, when appropriate, a written response is given.

Where there is sufficient evidence to suggest that a breach of military flying regulations may have occurred, the details are passed to the RAF police for investigation. On completion, the RAF police report is, where appropriate, passed to the commanding officer of the aircrew concerned for consideration as to what further action may be necessary and what can be learnt from the incident. In each case, the complainant is provided with the conclusions and a summary of the findings of the report.

My Department will pay compensation where a reasonable connection can be established between military aircraft activity and any loss, injury or damage sustained.

Captured Service Men

Sir Keith Speed: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what briefing and instructions are given to service men who may be captured or taken hostage about their response to their captors and the media.     [29338]

Mr. Soames: In the event of capture by an enemy, service personnel are instructed to follow article 17 of the Geneva convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War 1949 and reveal their name, rank, serial number and date of birth to their captors. They are also trained to respond to further questioning without releasing any useful information or allowing themselves to be exploited for propaganda purposes. Queen's regulations forbid service personnel from responding to approaches from the media without authorisation.

Nuclear Tests

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what discussions he has had with his (a) United States counterpart and (b) French counterpart concerning the development of simulations systems to replace nuclear tests; and if he will make a statement.     [30041]

Mr. Freeman: In the absence of underground testing, we intend to develop further a range of experimental techniques and facilities for the stewardship of our nuclear weapons stockpile, including above ground experiments, lasers and computer simulation. This work will be undertaken in continuing co-operation with the United States. Discussions have also been held with French authorities on issues relating to nuclear weapons stewardship.

Dartmouth Naval College

Dr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is the cost per officer at the Dartmouth naval college; how many officers pass through Dartmouth naval college each year; and which Royal Navy training facilities are situated in Dartmouth.     [30043]

Mr. Soames: This is a matter for the Naval Recruiting and Training Agency under its framework document. I have asked the chief executive to write to the hon. Member.


Column 380

Letter from J. P. Clarke to Dr. David Clark, dated 22 June 1995: The Secretary of State for Defence has asked me to reply to your Parliamentary Question, about the training of young Royal Naval officers at the Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, in my capacity as Chief Executive of the Naval Recruiting and Training Agency.

On entry to Dartmouth for Naval General Training, Young Naval Officers undertake 16 weeks shore-based training followed by a further 8 weeks of sea-based training, all of which is administered by the College. Following a further 8 months training in the Fleet, non-graduate entry Officers return to the College for an Academic course lasting some 24 weeks. The College is resourced for a training capacity of 460 (including Medical Dental, Special Duties and International Officers) which gives a cost per trainee day of £229.00 for the Naval General Training Course and £149.00 per day for the Academics Course.

You will also wish to be aware that the Agency is developing initiatives with private industry and academic institutions to market the unallocated irreducible training capacity which is caused by fluctuating recruiting levels reflected in the figures quoted below. These initiatives will generate enduring income streams, thereby reducing the overall costs of the College.

Over the last two years the officer training throughput has reduced in line with lower recruiting targets. From 1995 onwards higher recruiting targets will, however, increase trainee throughput to the level of the College's resourced capacity.

The College's officer training throughput since 1991 is as follows:

1991: 554

1992: 465

1993: 369

1994: 220

1995: 240*

1996: 298*

The above figures include RN Officers of Seaman, Engineer, Supply and Secretariat, Instructor, Medical, Dental, Chaplaincy and Special Duties specialisations in addition to international officers from Foreign and Commonwealth Navies. The figures marked by an asterisk denote predicted throughput figures.

Seamanship training is provided at BRNC's Sandquay facility and the College's proximity to Dartmoor is utilised for leadership training activities.

I hope this is helpful.

Chemical and Biological Weapons (Russia)

Mr. David Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment he has made of Russia's (a) biological and (b) chemical capabilities; and if he will make a statement.     [30042]

Mr. Soames: Russia inherited offensive chemical and biological warfare capabilities from the former Soviet Union. Her Majesty's Government place a high priority on confirming the elimination of the former Soviet programmes in accordance with the biological and toxin weapons convention and the chemical weapons convention; we are pursuing this objective through discussions with Russia and in multilateral arms control negotiations.

Trident

Mr. Hicks: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what review he is undertaking of the decision of June 1993 to award the refitting of Trident submarines to Devonport Management Ltd. and if he will make a statement.     [30045]


Column 381

Mr. Freeman: We have no plans to revisit the decision taken in 1993 that future refitting of nuclear powered submarines will be undertaken at Devonport.

Mr. Hicks: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) if a contract has been signed between his Department and Devonport Management Lltd. for the refitting of Trident submarines;     [30018] (2) when a contract will be signed between his Department and Devonport Management Ltd. for the refitting of Trident submarines following the decision of June 1993; and if he will make a statement.     [30044]

Mr. Freeman: No contract has yet been awarded for the construction of the Trident refitting facilities at Devonport. Negotiations with Devonport Management Ltd. are continuing with a view to completing the process by the end of the summer.


Column 382

Health and Safety Inspectors

Mr. Cummings: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many health and safety inspectors were in post in each region in each of the last five years.     [29359]

Mr. Oppenheim: Table A shows the number of health and safety inspectors employed in the Health and Safety Executive's field operations division regions. The figures comprise factory inspectors, agricultural inspectors, specialist inspectors and quarries inspectors. Table B shows the number of mines inspectors in the Mines Inspectorate, which is organised in districts. The figures are for the 1 April for each year. They do not include HSE inspectors working in nationally organised inspectorates; nor inspectors employed by other enforcing authorities.


Column 381


Table A                                                                                                                                               

               |Home          |London and                                                 |Wales and     |Yorkshire and                               

Year (1 April) |Counties      |South East    |Midlands      |North West    |Scotland      |South West    |North East    |Total                        

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1991           |116.5         |118           |167           |116.5         |90            |101           |132           |841                          

1992           |135.5         |124.5         |176.5         |119.9         |97            |112           |126.5         |891.5                        

1993           |132           |117.5         |182.5         |117           |102.5         |107           |133           |891.5                        

1994           |136.5         |126           |182.5         |125           |103.5         |97.5          |127.5         |898.5                        

1995           |119           |116           |165           |112.5         |94            |97.5          |123           |827                          

Note:                                                                                                                                                 

1 April 1995 figure reflects the immediate effects of an early retirement exercise. A new recruitment campaign is intended to restore the total       

number of inspectors in FOD to around previous levels.                                                                                                


Table B                                                                                                                                         

                                                |Scottish and   |Wales and                                                                      

Year (1 April)  |South Yorkshire|North Yorkshire|North Eastern  |South Eastern  |South West     |North Midlands |Total                          

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1991            |6              |6              |2              |7              |6              |6              |33                             


Year                                                                  

(1 April) |Central  |Northern |Western  |Southern |Total              

----------------------------------------------------------------------

1992      |6        |8        |7        |6        |27                 

1993      |-        |9        |4        |5        |18                 

1994      |-        |7        |5        |5        |17                 


                              |Wales and                                   

               |Scotland and  |West                                        

Year (1 April) |East England  |England       |Total                        

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

1995           |10            |5             |15                           

Note:                                                                      

Mines Central and Northern Districts merged 1 April 1993.                  

EMPLOYMENT

Labour Statistics

Mr. Chidgey: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what has been the year-on-year change in employment in (a) the United Kingdom, (b) France, (c) the United States of America, (d) Germany and (e) Japan, for each year since 1979.     [28119]

Mr. Oppenheim: Information showing the levels of employment in France, the United States, western Germany and Japan is published in OECD labour force statistics, 1972 92 and OECD quarterly labour force statistics no. 1, 1995. Copies of these publications are


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available in the Library. The latest available information for the United Kingdom which may differ from that printed in these publications is shown in the table:


Total civilian employment<1>  

in the United Kingdom at June 

of each                       

year: year-on-year changes    

1979-1994                     

Year      |Thousands          

------------------------------

1979-80   |-57                

1980-81   |-972               

1981-82   |-429               

1982-83   |-281               

1983-84   |648                

1984-85   |285                

1985-86   |29                 

1986-87   |560                

1987-88   |855                

1988-89   |804                

1989-90   |270                

1990-91   |-880               

1991-92   |-530               

1992-93   |-364               

1993-94   |37                 

<1> Unadjusted for seasonal   

variation.                    

Food Manufacturing Industry (Accidents)

Mr. Cummings: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how many reportable accidents have occurred in the food manufacturing industry in each region in each of the last five years.     [29357]


Column 383

Mr. Opppenheim: The information requested is given in the table:


Injuries to workers<1> in the food manufacturing industry<2> as               

reported to the health and safety executives's (HSE's)                        

field operations division inspectorates and local authorities                 

HSE region  |1989-90   |1990-91   |1991-92   |1992-93   |1993-94              

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wales and                                                                     

  South                                                                       

  West      |1,064     |1,155     |1,224     |1,245     |1,115                

Home                                                                          

  Counties  |2,350     |2,041     |2,124     |1,946     |1,853                

London and                                                                    

  South                                                                       

  East      |1,087     |1,007     |898       |790       |761                  

Midlands    |2,602     |2,484     |2,344     |2,172     |2,122                

Yorkshire                                                                     

  and North                                                                   

  East      |2,673     |2,688     |2,764     |2,530     |2,188                

North West  |2,051     |1,909     |1,871     |1,860     |1,676                

Scotland    |1,165     |1,196     |1,053     |952       |853                  

<1> The term workers relates to employees (including trainees) and the        

self-employed.                                                                

<2> As defined by Standard Industrial Classification 1980 activity headings   

4115 to 4239.                                                                 

Data shown in the table prior to 1990-91 excludes reports made to the         

Quarries Inspectorate.                                                        

Training

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what proposals he has to amend the budgeting system for training courses for areas where there is high long-term unemployment.     [29717]

Mr. Paice: Training for work is the main programme for adults out of work for a long time or at a disadvantage. The budget for the programme is distributed to training and enterprise councils by reference to the numbers of long-term unemployed, past levels of expenditure and performance in securing outcomes for participants. Budgets are also subject to negotiations between Government offices and individual TECs.

South Thames TEC

Mr. Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what estimate he has made of the total bill of his Department to the administrative receiver of South Thames TEC; and what assessment he has made of its impact on the other creditors' prospects of debt recovery.     [29625]

Mr. Paice: The Department estimates that it is owed £8.48 million by South Thames training and enterprise council and has presented the receiver with a bill to that effect. The Department is a secured creditor under the terms of its debenture. Until the receiver has completed his work, it will not be possible to assess the impact of the Department's bill on the prospects for unsecured creditors recovering money owed them.

Jobseeker's Allowance

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what estimate he has made of the administrative cost for (a) the preparation for the implementation of the jobseeker's allowance and (b) the actual implementation of the jobseeker's allowance.     [29727]


Column 384

Miss Widdecombe: Initial estimates of the one-off administrative costs of implementing the jobseeker's allowance, including both preparation and actual implementation, and the back-to-work bonus were £280 million over the period 1995 96 to 1997 98. This figure is currently being reviewed, following the decision to defer the full operation of JSA to October 1996.

Workplace Accidents (Children)

Mrs. Clwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what assessment he has made of surveys and official statistics on the number of school-age children involved in accidents while in paid employment in each year since 1985.     [30287]

Mr. Oppenheim: The survey reports of which I am aware are unrepresentative of the country as a whole and inadequately distinguish between serious accidents which should be reported to the enforcing authorities and minor cuts and bruises.

Mrs. Clwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what statistics are available concerning the number of accidents to school-age children involved in paid employment in the years 1992 93 and 1993 94.     [30288]

Mr. Oppenheim: The tables show injuries to employed people aged under 16 reported to the Health and Safety Executive's factory and agricultural inspectorates and to local authorities under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985:


Injuries to employees<1 >aged under 16 reported to HSE's Factory  

and Agricultural Inspectorates and Local Authorities, 1992-93 and 

1993-94 by industry                                               

Industry                               |1992-93 |1993-94          

------------------------------------------------------------------

Agriculture                            |10      |5                

Manufacturing                          |2       |10               

Construction                           |3       |4                

Wholesale distribution                 |-       |1                

Retail distribution                    |9       |4                

Hotels and catering                    |3       |2                

Repair of consumer goods and vehicles  |1       |-                

Transport and communication            |-       |-                

Banking, finance and business services |-       |1                

Other services                         |7       |7                

Unclassified                           |1       |-                

                                                                  

Total                                  |36      |34               


Injuries to employees<1> aged under 16 reported       

to HSE's factory and agricultural inspectorates and   

local authorities, 1992-93 and 1993-94 by severity of 

injury                                                

                           |Over 3                    

Year     |Fatal   |Major<2>|day<3>  |Total            

------------------------------------------------------

1992-93  |1       |11      |24      |36               

1993-94  |1       |16      |17      |34               

Total    |2       |27      |41      |70               

Notes:                                                

<1> including trainees.                               

<2> as defined in the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases 

and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, 1985, and      

including injuries which require a stay in hospital   

of over 24 hours.                                     

<3> injuries which cause absence from work for more   

than three days.                                      

Mrs. Clwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment how his Department (a) collects and (b) collates information and statistics concerning the incidence of accidents to children in paid employment who are of school-leaving age.     [30289]


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Mr. Oppenheim: Under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985, employers have a duty to report to the relevant enforcing authority injuries, arising out of work activity, to employees of all ages. The relevant authority may be either the Health and Safety Executive or the local authority. Reports made to HSE are collated and held centrally. Information from reports made to local authorities is submitted annually to HSE on a voluntary basis and aggregated with the reports made direct to HSE.

Mrs. Clwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment what information is available for each year since 1985 concerning children involved in accidents while in paid (a) agricultural and (b) horticultural employment;     [30286]

Mr. Oppenheim: The table shows injuries to employees aged under 16 reported under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1985 in each year for which reliable figures are available. The figure in brackets show the only injury reported in Wales.


Injuries to employees<1> aged under 16 in agriculture 

and                                                   

horticulture<2> reported to HSE's factory and         

agricultural                                          

inspectorates and local authorities, from 1987-88 to  

1993-94-by                                            

severity of injury                                    

                           |Over 3                    

Year     |Fatal   |Major<2>|day<3>  |Total            

------------------------------------------------------

1987-88  |1       |8       |5       |14               

1988-89  |-       |1       |1       |2                

1989-90  |-       |5       |4       |9                

1990-91  |-       |1       |4       |5                

1991-92  |-       |1       |-       |1                

1992-93  |-       |6       |4(1)    |10(1)            

1993-94  |1       |3       |1       |5                

Notes:                                                

<1> Including trainees.                               

<2> As defined by Standard Industrial Classification  

01                                                    

<3> As defined in the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases 

and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations, 1985, and      

including injuries which require a stay in hospital   

of over 24 hours.                                     

<4> Injuries which cause absence from work for more   

than three days.                                      

Mrs. Clwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment (1) what assessment has been made of surveys and official statistics on the number of school-age children in Wales involved in accidents while engaged in paid (a) agricultural and (b) horticultural employment in each year since 1985;     [30285]

(2) what assessment has been made of surveys and official statistics on the number of school-age children in Wales involved in accidents while engaged in paid (a) agricultural and (b) horticultural employment in each year since 1985.     [30283]

Mr. Oppenheim: The survey reports of which I am aware are unrepresentative of Wales and the country as a whole and inadequately distinguish serious accidents which should be reported to the enforcing authorities from minor cuts and bruises.


Column 386

The official statistics show that one injury was reported in Wales in the period, from 1987 88 to 1993 94, for which reliable figures are available.

International Labour Organisation Conventions

Mr. Corbett: To ask the Secretary of State for Employment if he will list those International Labour Organisation conventions which the United Kingdom has signed and the year of signature.     [30228]

Miss Widdecombe: The information is shown in the table:


ILO conventions ratified by the United Kingdom                               

                                                   |Date of                  

Number                                             |ratification             

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

2 Unemployment, 1919                               |1921                     

4 Night Work (Women), 1919<1>                      |1921                     

5 Minimum Age (Industry), 1919                     |1921                     

6 Night Work of Young Persons (Industry), 1919<1>  |1921                     

7 Minimum Age (Sea), 1920                          |1921                     

8 Unemployment Indemnity (Shipwreck), 1920         |1926                     

10 Minimum Age (Agriculture), 1921                 |1963                     

11 Right of Association (Agriculture), 1921        |1923                     

12 Workmen's Compensation (Agriculture), 1921      |1923                     

15 Minimum Age (Trimmers and Stokers), 1921        |1926                     

16 Medical Examination of Young Persons (Sea),                               

  1921                                             |1926                     

17 Workmen's Compensation (Accidents), 1925        |1949                     

18 Workmen's Compensation (Occupational                                      

  Diseases), 1925<1>                               |1926                     

19 Equality of Treatment (Accident Compensation),                            

  1925                                             |1926                     

21 Inspection of Emigrants, 1926                   |1927                     

22 Seamen's Articles of Agreement, 1926            |1929                     

23 Repatriation of Seamen, 1926                    |1985                     

24 Sickness Insurance (Industry), 1927             |1931                     

25 Sickness Insurance (Agriculture), 1927          |1931                     

26 Minimum Wage-Fixing Machinery, 1928<1>          |1929                     

29 Forced Labour, 1930                             |1931                     

32 Protection Against Accidents (Dockers)                                    

 (Revised), 1932                                   |1935                     

35 Old-Age Insurance (Industry etc), 1933          |1936                     

36 Old-Age Insurance (Agriculture), 1933           |1936                     

37 Invalidity Insurance (Industry, etc), 1933      |1936                     

38 Invalidity Insurance (Agriculture), 1933        |1936                     

39 Survivors' Insurance (Industry, etc), 1933      |1936                     

40 Survivors' Insurance (Agriculture), 1933        |1936                     

41 Night Work (Women) (Revised), 1934<1>           |1937                     

42 Workmen's Compensation (Occupational                                      

  Diseases) (Revised), 1934                        |1936                     

43 Sheet-Glass Works, 1934<1>                      |1937                     

44 Unemployment Provision, 1934                    |1936                     

45 Underground Work (Women), 1935<1>               |1936                     

50 Recruiting of Indigenous Workers, 1936          |1939                     

56 Sickness Insurance (Sea), 1936                  |1944                     

63 Statistics of Wages and Hours of Work, 1938<1>  |1947                     

64 Contracts of Employment (Indigenous Workers),                             

  1939                                             |1943                     

65 Penal Sanctions (Indigenous Workers), 1939      |1943                     

68 Food and Catering (Ships' Crews), 1946          |1953                     

69 Certification of Ships' Cooks, 1946             |1949                     

70 Social Security (Seafarers), 1946               |1953                     

74 Certification of Able Seamen, 1946              |1952                     

80 Final Articles Revision, 1946                   |1947                     

81 Labour Inspection, 1947                         |1949                     


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