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Immigration (Carriers Liability)

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps he is taking to recover the sums outstanding under the Immigration (Carriers Liability) Act 1987. [25945]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: Sums due as a result of charge liabilities under the Immigration (Carriers' Liability) Act 1987 (ICLA) are public moneys owed to the Consolidated Fund of Her Majesty's Treasury. The Ports Directorate of the Immigration Service is responsible for recovering amounts owed by carriers under the ICLA and pursues a pro-active debt recovery strategy aimed at reducing the amounts outstanding as quickly as possible.

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the amount of charges (a) levied and (b) recovered under the Immigration (Carriers Liability) Act 1987 in relation to offences under that Act at each airport in the United Kingdom for each of the last 10 years. [25952]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: These figures are available only for 1997 and are set out in the table. Figures before 1997 could be produced only at disproportionate cost. It must be made clear that some of the incurred charges may have been paid since these statistics were compiled or may be about to be paid under an agreement negotiated with the Home Office.

AirportIncurred (£)Paid (£)
Aberdeen4,0000
Belfast14,00016,000
Birmingham60,00014,000
Bournemouth00
Bristol8,00010,000
Brize Norton00
Cambridge00
Cardiff00
East Midlands4,0004,000
Edinburgh28,00020,000
Gatwick North728,0001,090,000
Gatwick South1,720,0001,103,000
Glasgow54,00042,000
Heathrow 11,388,0001,358,000
Heathrow 22,004,0001,544,000
Heathrow 33,250,0002,642,000
Heathrow 41,358,0001,442,000
Humberside20,00032,000
Leeds/Bradford2,0002,000
Liverpool00
London City92,00050,000
Luton108,00050,000
Manchester 1194,000172,000
Manchester 2112,000130,000
Mildenhall00
Newcastle18,00018,000
Norwich4,0004,000
Plymouth00
Prestwick00
Southend00
Stansted142,000192,000
Swansea00
Teeside00

29 Jan 1998 : Column: 340

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if it is his policy to allow airlines which owe charges under the Immigration (Carriers Liability) Act 1987 to continue to use United Kingdom airports. [25944]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: There is no power under the Immigration (Carriers Liability) Act 1987 to refuse or prevent carriers who owe moneys under the Act from continuing to use United Kingdom airports.

There is, however, an active debt recovery programme operated by the Carriers' Liaison Section of Immigration Service Headquarters and litigation is considered in cases where a carrier unduly procrastinates or refuses to pay any debt, or where a carrier is in default of any agreement to settle charges.

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what charges were outstanding under the Immigration (Carriers Liability) Act 1987 on 1 January in each of the past 10 years. [25946]

Mr. Mike O'Brien: The figures requested are as follow:

DateOutstanding debt £
1 January 19882,361,000
1 January 19894,368,000
1 January 199010,170,000
1 January 199115,653,000
1 January 199219,440,000
1 January 199325,775,000
1 January 199422,003.000
1 January 199524,527,000
1 January 199618,746,000
1 January 199715,065,996
1 January 199811,399,073


29 Jan 1998 : Column: 341

Firemen

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent representations he has received about the pay and conditions of service and age of retirement for firemen; and what is his Department's policy on these matters. [25277]

Mr. George Howarth: My right hon. Friend has received three such letters from individual members of the public. Matters relating to pay and conditions of service (including age of retirement) are dealt with by the National Joint Council for Local Authorities' Fire Brigades. It is for the employers to ensure that pay settlements are affordable through improvements to efficiency and other economies.

Naltrexone

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to introduce the compulsory taking of naltrexone for criminals who are drug addicts; and if he will make a statement. [25951]

Mr. George Howarth: None. Deciding which drugs to prescribe in the treatment of drug misuse is a matter for the clinical judgement of the medical staff providing the treatment.

Witness Protection Scheme

Dr. Cable: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people sought relocation in 1997 under the Metropolitan Police's witness protection scheme; and how many were successfully rehoused, by borough. [25261]

Mr. Michael: The Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis informs me that 158 people sought relocation under the Metropolitan Police's witness protection scheme. He tells me that due to the sensitivities of those seeking assistance it is not the policy of the Metropolitan Police to publish more detailed information. This is an operational matter for the Commissioner.

Young Remand Prisoners

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the adult prisons used for the accommodation of 15 and 16 year olds on remand. [25512]

Ms Quin: The following establishments hold both adult prisoners and young offenders and can be used to hold 15 and 16-year-olds on remand. However, young offenders are normally accommodated separately from adults.











29 Jan 1998 : Column: 342




15 or 16-year-old females cannot normally be remanded to prisons. However, in the exceptional circumstance of being committed from a Magistrates' Crown to a Crown Court for sentence, a 15 or 16 year old female young offender would be remanded to a female prison. In such a case, allocation to a prison would be made on the basis of the individual's circumstances.

Data Protection

Mr. Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if, in respect to the Compliance Cost Assessment associated with the Data Protection Bill [Lords], he will (a) place in the Library, in the form which respects commercial confidentiality, copies of the questionnaire telephone scripts used to assess the costs of compliance and all the responses used to assess the costs of compliance and all the responses received, (b) indicate the total number of individuals contacted during the consultation process, and the number of respondents with specialist knowledge of data protection matters, (c) list the organisations involved in providing information for the Assessment and (d) publish an updated version of the 1994 paper, "Costs of Implementing the Data Protection Directive". [25450]

Mr. George Howarth: I am placing in the Library a copy of the questionnaire, which we sent to 84 organisations. We received responses from six local authorities; one representative educational organisation; five charities; four large manufacturers; three small manufacturers; ten financial and other service organisations; eight large organisations involved in marketing; and nine retailers. We assured participants of anonymity and it would not be appropriate to make the individual returns available, or list names. We did not ask about the depth of their data protection knowledge.

Estimated costs to Government Departments were assessed separately.

Mr. Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the practice of enforced subject access in respect of the provisions of the Data Protection Bill (Lords). [25600]

Mr. George Howarth: The Government have made public their opposition to the practice of enforced subject access. We are considering how best to deal with the matter in the context of the Data Protection Bill.

Mr. Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the purpose of the First Data Protection Principle in Part 1, Schedule 1 to the Data Protection Bill (Lords). [25599]

Mr. George Howarth: The purpose of the first data protection principle is to ensure that personal data are processed fairly and lawfully. The principle, as elaborated in Part II of Schedule 1 and Schedules 2 and 3 gives effect to articles 6.1, 7, 8, 10 and 11 of the 1995 European Communities Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC).

Mr. Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received from the Data Protection Commissioner with respect to

29 Jan 1998 : Column: 343

(a) enforcement of the right of data subjects under Article 12(c) of the Data Protection Directive and (b) serving of information notices; and if he will make a statement. [25601]

Mr. George Howarth: We have received no representations from the Data Protection Registrar about the enforcement of article 12(c) of the 1995 European Communities Data Protection Directive (95/46/EC). The Registrar has written welcoming the new power for the Commissioner to issue information notices but expressing a preference for the power to be modelled on those in other regulatory legislation.

Mr. Cohen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has for regulations relating to the processing of personal data which (a) contain a general identifying number and (b) are subject to Clause 28(4) of the Data Protection Bill [Lords]. [25451]

Mr. George Howarth: No firm decisions have yet been made about the use of the Secretary of State's power under paragraph 4 of Part II of Schedule 1 to the Data Protection Bill to prescribe conditions applying to general identifiers; or of that in clause 28(4) to make exemptions from the subject information and non-disclosure provisions.


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