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NORTHERN IRELAND

Terrorist Activities

Mr. William Ross: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when, where and by what means (a) Judge William Doyle, (b) Mr. Edgar Graham, (c) Lord Justice Gibson and his wife, (d) Resident Magistrate W. Staunton and (e) Resident Magistrate Martin McBirney were murdered; which terrorist organisation was responsible; how many persons have been brought before the courts for that crime; and what sentences were imposed. [81166]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 16 April 1999]: The information requested is as follows:



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Mr. William Ross: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when, where and by what means Resident Magistrate Mr. Tom Travers and his wife were injured and their daughter murdered; which terrorist organisation was responsible; how many persons have been brought before the courts for that crime; and what sentences were imposed. [81167]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 16 April 1999]: At approximately 1 pm on 8 April 1984, Mr. Thomas Travers RM, his wife and their daughter Mary were walking to their home having just attended Mass at St. Brigid's Church in Derryvolgie Avenue when they were attacked by two gunmen. As a result Mary Travers was fatally wounded and Thomas Travers was seriously wounded. Mrs. Travers escaped injury. The attack was attributed to the Irish Republican Army.

Shortly after the incident police arrested a young woman in the Wellington Park area of the city. She was found to have two handguns in her possession. Both guns were later linked to the attack on the Travers family. She was subsequently convicted of the murder of Mary Travers and the attempted murder of Thomas Travers and received a life sentence.

A second person was arrested some seven weeks later and was identified by Mr. Travers as being one of the gunmen. However, he was acquitted of all charges.

Mr. William Ross: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland when, where, and by what means Judge Rory Conaghan was murdered; which terrorist organisation was responsible; how many persons have been brought before the courts for that crime; and what sentences were imposed. [81245]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 16 April 1999]: At approximately 8.30 am on 16 September 1974, a person, posing as a postman, rang the doorbell of Judge Conaghan's home at 17 Beechlands, Malone Road, Belfast. The door was answered by Judge Conaghan. He was shot and fatally wounded. The gunman made off and

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was seen to get into a car which was driven by another person. The car was later abandoned in Windsor Avenue, Belfast. Witnesses observed that two males and a girl were seen to leave the car. The vehicle had been taken from its owner in the Dermott Hill Road, Belfast earlier that day by a person claiming to be from the Irish Republican Army.

To date, no one has been made amenable for Judge Conaghan's murder.

Belfast Brook Pregnancy Advisory Clinic

Rev. Martin Smyth: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if she will list the amount of Government grants given to the Belfast Brook Pregnancy Advisory Clinic for each year since 1990 (a) directly and (b) through health boards and trusts. [84409]

Mr. McFall: The information requested is as follows:


(a) Directly: nil
(b) Through boards and trusts:

Year£
1990-910
1991-9230,000
1992-9331,500
1993-9431,500
1994-9545,172
1995-9649,847
1996-9767,468
1997-9872,340
1998-9969,096

Sports Funding

Mr. John D. Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how much public funding has been given to (a) the Irish Rugby Football Union, (b) the Irish Football Association, (c) the Northern Ireland Cricket Association and (d) the Irish Hockey Union in each of the last five years; and if she will make a statement. [84323]

Mr. McFall: Responsibility for funding sports organisations rests with the Sports Council of Northern Ireland, who have advised me that the total amount of public funding from normal funding and the Lottery for the Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU), the Irish Football Association (IFA), the Northern Ireland Cricket Association (NICA) and the Irish Hockey Union (IHU) is as follows:

£
IRFUIFANICAIHU
1998-9910,073.8553,548.6741,384.0236,671.13
1997-9823,544.4547,719.5625,866.2019,177.42
1996-975,829.7560,115.0324,799.4631,623.09
1995-963,631.35(1)40,856.0324,357.7547,829.14
1994-956,973.7015,148.4423,865.7531,730.94

(1) Includes a special capital grant of £3,811.38 from Department of Education


Census Returns

Mr. John M. Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland if she will publish the text of the (a) non-statutory assurances of confidentiality and

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(b) 100-year extended closure given by the Registrar General on the householders' forms for the 20th century censuses of population for Northern Ireland. [84491]

Mr. Paul Murphy: The assurances on confidentiality listed on household forms for the 20th century censuses of population for Northern Ireland are as follows:


1928 and 1937:
All particulars given in the Return will be regarded as strictly confidential and will be issued only to prepare general census summaries.
1951:
All particulars given in this Return will be regarded as strictly confidential.
1961:
The contents of this Return are strictly confidential.
1971:
The information you give on the form will be treated as "Confidential" and used only for compiling statistics. No information about named individuals will be passed by the Census Office to any other Government Department or any other Authority or person.
1981:
The information which you give on the form will be treated as "Strictly Confidential" and will be used only for compiling statistics. No names and addresses will be fed into the computer and no information about named individuals will be passed by the Census Office to any other Government Department or to any other Authority or person.
1991:
Your answers will be treated in strict confidence and used only to produce statistics. No names and addresses will be put into the computer; only the postcode will be entered. The forms will be kept securely and treated as confidential. No information about named individuals will be passed by the Census Office to any other Government Department or to any other authority or person.
Note:
The Censuses of 1901 and 1911 were taken on an all Ireland basis. The original census records are held in Dublin.

The Census Act (Northern Ireland, 1969 requires that information obtained from Northern Ireland censuses is to be used for census purposes only and that census records are to be kept closed.

Mr. John M. Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, pursuant to section 123 of the White Paper on the 2001 Census, when she plans to bring forward proposals for an end to the permanent closure to public inspection of Northern Ireland census returns. [84499]

Mr. Paul Murphy: The Census White Paper (cm 4253) indicated that consideration would be given to availing of a suitable legislative opportunity to introduce to Northern Ireland similar provisions to those in Great Britain on the closure of historic census records. To date, no suitable opportunity has arisen, but the position is kept under continuous review.


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