Select Committee on Environment, Transport and Regional Affairs Appendices to the Minutes of Evidence


ANNEX

United Kingdom National Review of Speed Policy 1998

SUGGESTED OUTLINE BY THE SLOWER SPEEDS INITIATIVE

1. THE POLICY BACKGROUND

  The Transport White Paper (n.b. the main strands of the Review should "integrate" with the themes and policies of this).

  The Road Safety review, including targets for reducing casualty rates.

  Guidance to local authorities on road traffic reduction.

  National Cycle Strategy (target of quadrupling cycle use by 2012).

  National Walking Strategy.

  New policies for buses and rail.

  New policies for freight and for trunk roads.

  Forthcoming revision of Policy Planning Guidance on Housing, Transport and Regional Planning.

  Changes in vehicle taxation.

  Government targets for: air quality, greenhouse gas reduction, casualty reduction within Health programmes.

2. THE CURRENT UK SITUATION

  A brief history of speed limits. When and why they were introduced or changed.

  Past criteria used. The current state of:

    (1)  Compliance.

    (2)  Enforcement.

    (3)  Resources devoted.

  Achievements and limitations to date.

3. LITERATURE SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE

to include future proposals, strategies and research.

4. KEY THEMES TO BE ADDRESSED

  The relationship between speed and:

    —  The number and severity of road accidents and casualties.

    —  Driver perceptions of own safety and journey times.

    —  Non-driver and resident perceptions of safety.

    —  Non-accident costs of unsafe roads: e.g., decreases in cycling and walking, large rise in motorised escort trips to school.

    —  Fuel efficiency.

    —  Toxic vehicle emissions.

    —  Carbon Dioxide emissions.

    —  Noise (public perceptions and nuisance within differing noise contours).

    —  Highway capacities.

    —  Journey lengths.

    —  Journey times.

    —  Modal choice: for passengers and freight.

    —  Effective enforcement of limits.

5. MEANS OF ENFORCEMENT

  (A) Conventional means and how they might be improved: physical measures, traffic calming and highway design; policing; traffic law and penalties; speed cameras: other highway technology.

  (B) The future: variable speed limiters, activated internally and externally; using Construction and Use regulations to limit top speeds and acceleration; new categories of environmental, low speed vehicles.

  (C) Cultural attitudes and peer pressure; new drivers; boy racers; motoring press and wider media.

6. DETERMINING SPEED LIMITS FOR DIFFERENT CLASSES OF ROAD

  How to get the best mix of four and five above.

  Other vital elements:

    —  Road design

    —  Traffic mix

    —  Weather

    —  Road capacity

    —  Traffic flow

    —  Rural issues

    —  Road hierarchy

    —  Time of day

    —  Homezones

7. RESEARCH AND TRIALS

  What areas of data collection need improving?

  Opinion surveys of:

    —  Car drivers

    —  Cyclists

    —  Elderly

    —  Lorry drivers

    —  Pedestrians

    —  People with disabilities

    —  Coach/bus drivers

    —  Children

    —  Residents (urban and rural)

  Controlled trials mixing elements of five and six above.

8. CONSULTATION

    —  Transport experts

    —  Highways Agency

    —  Motoring bodies

    —  Rail/bus operators

    —  Community groups

    —  Pedestrians

    —  Land use planners

    —  Local government

    —  Road safety organisations

    —  Health bodies

    —  Disabilities groups

    —  Schools/Home Zones

    —  Legal profession

    —  Police

    —  Car manufacturers

    —  Environmental groups

    —  Cyclists

    —  Market researchers

9. INDICATE LIKELY CHANGES IN POLICY AND MECHANISMS

10. ESTABLISH MOST EFFECTIVE METHODS OF PRESENTING NEW THINKING TO GENERAL PUBLIC IN A POSITIVE WAY

Slower Speeds Initiative

September 1998


 
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Prepared 28 April 1999