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Disability Living Allowance

Dr. Iddon: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if section 10 of the Social Security Act 1998 and Regulation 7(c)(ii) of the Social Security (Decision and Appeals) Regulations 1999, which allows supersession at a later date of an original decision to award Disability Living Allowance when it is believed there has been a change of circumstance, can be applied following an appeal tribunal decision that has found in favour of the claimant using the same evidence available for the same period of time. [105175]

Angela Eagle: Yes.

The Secretary of State is empowered by section 10 of the Social Security Act 1998 and regulation 6 of the Social Security and Child Support (Decisions and Appeals) Regulation 1999 to supersede both his own decisions and those of appeal tribunals. Regulation 7(2)(c)(ii) allows, for instance in Disability Living Allowance, a superseding decision to be effective from the date the Secretary of State is satisfied a disadvantageous change of circumstances took place.

Where a tribunal finds in favour of an appellant, but in doing so does not (or is unable to) consider the available evidence, the Secretary of State may subsequently supersede on the basis of that same evidence. There is, of course, a further right of appeal against this new decision.

State Pension

Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate the cost of raising the basic State Pension (a) to the level of income support, (b) by £5 per week, and (c) by £10 per week. [106516]

Mr. Rooker: The information is in the table:

Estimated cost of raising the basic State Pension, including linked benefits for 2000-01 £ million

GrossNet
To minimum income guarantee level6,2804,830
By £5 per week2,8702,200
By £10 per week5,7404,410

Notes:

1. Gross estimates have been provided by the Government Actuary's Department.

2. For part (a), the full Category A rate of pension has been raised to the level of the Minimum Income Guarantee for a single pensioner aged 60-74 (£78.45 per week in 2000-01). Other categories of State Pension have been increased pro-rata.

3. For parts (b) and (c), the increases shown apply to the full Category A rate. Other categories of State Pension have been increased pro-rata.

4. Means-tested benefit offsets have been estimated using the Income Support Simulation Model and the Policy Simulation Model.

5. Estimates are in 1999-2000 prices and are rounded to the nearest £10 million.


Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate the cost of introducing a top up on the basic state pension of (a) £3 at age 75 years and £5 at age 80 years and (b) £5 at age 75 years and £10 at age 80 years. [106518]

24 Jan 2000 : Column: 86W

Mr. Rooker: The information is in the table.

Estimated cost of introducing a top up on the basic state retirement pension for 2000-01

£ million
GrossNet
£3 per week for ages 75-79, £5 per week for ages 80 and over940640
£5 per week for ages 75-79, £10 per week for ages 80 and over1,8101,220

Notes:

1. Gross estimates have been provided by the Government Actuary's Department.

2. Age-related increases are assumed to be paid in full irrespective of the proportion of the full Category A rate of basic state pension received.

3. Means-tested benefit offsets have been estimated using the Income Support Simulation Model and the Policy Simulation Model.

4. Estimates are in 1999-2000 prices and are rounded to the nearest £10 million.


Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate the cost of raising the over 80 top-up on the state pension from 25 pence per week to (a) £5 per week, (b) £10 per week, and (c) £15 per week; and if he will make a statement. [106517]

Mr. Rooker: The information is in the table.

Estimated cost of raising the age addition to the basic state retirement pension for 2000-01
£ million

GrossNet
£5 per week620390
£10 per week1,280810
£15 per week1,9301,270

Notes:

1. Gross estimates have been provided by the Government Actuary's Department.

2. Age-related increases are assumed to be paid in full irrespective of the proportion of the full Category A rate of basic state pension received.

3. Means-tested benefit offsets have been estimated using the Income Support Simulation Model and the Policy Simulation Model.

4. Estimates are in 1999-2000 prices and are rounded to the nearest £10 million.


Mr. Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many recipients of the basic state pension are aged (a) under 75 years, (b) 75 years and over, and (c) 80 years and over; and if he will make a statement. [106519]

Mr. Rooker: The information is in the table.

Number of recipients in Great Britain and overseas in receipt of the basic state retirement pension at 31 March 1999

Million
Age under 756.3
Age 75 and over4.5
Age 80 and over2.4

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest hundred thousand

Source:

5 per cent. sample from the Pension Strategy Computer System


24 Jan 2000 : Column: 87W

Habitual Residence Test

Mr. Keetch: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what criteria are used to determine whether individuals are habitually resident in the UK; and if he will make a statement. [106166]

Mr. Bayley: The purpose of the habitual residence test is to ensure that the income related benefits are paid to people with reasonably close ties to the United Kingdom and an intention to settle here. Each case is considered on its own merits. Guidance to decision makers and caselaw stresses the need to consider a wide range of factors, including the reason for a person coming (or returning) to the United Kingdom, the length of their stay, a settled intention to reside and any previous links with the country. The weight given to each factor will depend upon the individual's circumstances. Guidance to decision makers is contained in the Decision Makers Guide Volume 2 at paragraph 070719.

Correspondence

Mr. Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security when he will reply to the letter of 22 September 1999 from the hon. and learned Member for Harborough to the Under-Secretary of State, the hon. Member for Wallasey (Angela Eagle), on behalf of the estate of Mr. A. J. H. Boulter of Wigston, Leicestershire. [105983]

Angela Eagle: A reply was sent to the hon. and learned Member on 24 January.

CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT

Wembley Stadium

Mr. Paul Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if he will list the bodies consulted on the design of the proposed ramped area from the external road to the olympic track of the English National Stadium Project; and if he will make a statement. [102391]

Kate Hoey: The design of the ramp area was a matter for Wembley National Stadium Ltd. (WNSL) as part of its overall brief for the design of the stadium.

Mr. Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport on what basis he seeks to recover moneys from the Lottery award for the development of the English National Stadium at Wembley. [104327]

Kate Hoey [holding answer 10 January 2000]: Sport England, the Football Association and WNSL are currently considering whether amendments are necessary to the existing Lottery Funding Agreement to reflect Wembley's new role as the centrepiece for football and rugby league in England. In the light of the prospective agreement, the Football Association has proposed that £20 million be returned to Sport England.

Mr. Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what estimate he has made of the additional costs of building the new Wembley Stadium in athletics mode with a capacity of 80,000, rather than in football mode with a capacity of 90,000. [104326]

24 Jan 2000 : Column: 88W

Kate Hoey [holding answer 10 January 2000]: I understand that although preliminary discussions took place between Wembley National Stadium, Sport England and UK Athletics about proposals to build the new stadium at Wembley in athletics mode with a capacity of 80,000, no estimates of additional costs were made.

Mr. Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment he has made of proposals to offset the costs of building the athletics platform at Wembley Stadium against the corporate hospitality rights owned by UK Athletics. [104338]

Kate Hoey [holding answer 10 January 2000]: The use of corporate hospitality rights at the new Wembley Stadium during an athletics event would be a matter for commercial negotiation between Wembley National Stadium Ltd. (WNSL) and the event organiser, UK Athletics. While preliminary discussions had taken place between WNSL and UK Athletics in which the Government did not take part, I understand that no firm agreements had been reached.

Mr. Gardiner: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport which condition of the Lottery Funding Agreement for the development of the English National Stadium at Wembley has been breached. [104328]

Kate Hoey [holding answer 10 January 2000]: The question of whether the conditions of a Lottery Funding Agreement have been breached are a matter for the Lottery distributor, in this case Sport England.


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