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Primary Care Group Board

Mr. Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many Primary Care Group Board members are from the Professions Allied to Medicine. [120064]

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Ms Stuart [holding answer 20 April 2000]: The composition of primary care groups governing boards reflects the need to ensure that general practitioners and nurses are in the driving seat for the shaping of local health care services. Professions Allied to Medicine may become co-opted members on the boards of local primary care groups but that information is not held centrally.

Mr. Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health, pursuant to his answer of 16 March 2000, Official Report, column 306W, for what reason the completion of equal opportunities forms by primary care group board members is not compulsory; and if he will make their completion compulsory. [120061]

Ms Stuart [holding answer 20 April 2000]: Committees of National Health Service organisations are not statutory bodies and therefore members of such committees are not subject to the same requirements to submit equal opportunity information as are board members of NHS organisations. A primary care group is a committee of a health authority

There are no plans to introduce compulsory equal opportunity forms for primary care group board members.

Mr. Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many primary care group board members are nurses, midwives or health visitors from ethnic minority backgrounds. [120062]

Ms Stuart [holding answer 20 April 2000]: Based on the information provided by primary care groups last year, there are 12 primary care group board nurse, midwives or health visitor members from ethnic minority backgrounds. This information is currently being updated to reflect any changes in primary care groups and the creation of 17 primary care trusts from 1 April 2000.

Nurses and Health Visitors

Mr. Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many (a) health visitors and (b) district nurses are aged 55 years old and over; and what proportion of the current workforce in each case they represent; [120006]

Ms Stuart [holding answer 20 April 2000]: The available information is shown in the tables. 2000-01 training figures are forecast and 2001-02 are not available.

NHS Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS): All health visitors and district nurses, who are 55 years of age and over, within England, as at 30 September 1998
Whole-time equivalents

Health visitorDistrict nurse
Staff 55 years of age and over1,3301,270
Percentage of staff 55 years of age and over1311
Total staff10,07011,430

Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

2. Figures exclude learners and agency staff.

3. Percentages were calculated from numbers of staff expressed as whole-time equivalents.

Source:

Department of Health Non-Medical Workforce Census


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NHS funded pre-registration training commissions forecast figures for 2000-01

Commissions
Health visitor662
School nurses162
District nurses619

Sources:

Department of Health Financial and Workforce Information Return


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Health Visitors (Ethnicity)

Mr. Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the breakdown was by ethnic origin of health visitors employed in London by NHS trusts in each of the last four years. [120063]

Ms Stuart [holding answer 20 April 2000]: The data requested for each of the last four years for which information is available are given in the table:

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YearTotalWhiteBlackAsianOtherUnknown
19951006918454
19961006820453
19971006322473
19981005926456

Notes:

1. Figures are expressed as percentages.

2. Information as at 30 September each year.

3. Percentages were calculated from numbers of staff expressed as whole-time equivalents.

Source:

Department of Health Non-Medical Workforce Census.


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Speech Therapists

Dr. Brand: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many speech therapists are employed by region; and how many vacancies there are for speech therapists. [120308]

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Mr. Denham: Information on how many speech therapists are employed by region; and how many vacancies there are for speech therapists are set out in the tables.

2 May 2000 : Column: 53W

NHS Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS): All speech and language therapy staff by Regional Office Area, in England as at 30 September 1998
Whole-time equivalent

All speech and language therapy staffManagerTherapistTutorStudent/traineeHelper/assistant
England4,1301003,730(8)--(8)--300
Northern and Yorkshire480204300030
Trent360103300020
Anglia and Oxford380(8)--3500020
North Thames70010640(8)--040
South Thames650105900050
South West490104500(8)--30
West Midlands480104200050
North and West590105200050
Other(8)--0(8)--000

(8) Five or less and greater than zero

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest ten

Source:

Department of Health 1998 non-medical work force census


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Department of Health Recruitment, Retention and Vacancies Survey--total and three month vacancies in NHS Trusts by region--speech and language therapy staff at 31 March 1999
Whole-time equivalent

Total vacanciesThree month vacancies
England18050
Northern and Yorkshire2010
Trent20(9)--
Anglia and Oxford100
North Thames4010
South Thames3010
South West20(9)--
West Midlands10(9)--
North and West3010

(9) Five or less and greater than zero

Notes:

1. Figures are rounded to the nearest ten.

2. Total vacancies are the total posts that Trusts were actively trying to fill at 31 March 1999.

3. Three month vacancies are those posts that had been vacant for three months or more at 31 March 1999.

4. All figures rounded to the nearest whole number.


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Dr. Brand: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many speech therapists are employed by the NHS by region who have special training in communication aids. [120309]

Mr. Denham: The information requested is not available centrally.

Dr. Brand: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many speech therapists are in training. [120307]

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Mr. Denham: There are currently 825 National Health Service funded speech and language therapists in training. This figure reflects those who have entered training since 1 September 1998 (the date on which the Department assumed responsibility for supporting new entrants on pre-registration speech and language therapy courses). Students who started their training prior to this date are funded under mainstream student support arrangements, which are a matter for the Department for Education and Employment.

Nurse Consultants

Mr. Austin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the breakdown is by (a) gender and (b) ethnic origin of the newly-appointed nurse consultants. [120005]

Ms Stuart [holding answer 20 April 2000]: On 18 January approval was given for National Health Service bodies to establish 141 new nurse, midwife and health visitor consultant posts. The appointment process is under way but has not been completed. Data on the gender and ethnic origin of those appointed are not yet available.

Birth Certificates

Mr. Caton: To ask the Secretary of State for Health for what purposes his Department requires a birth certificate to be furnished by (a) employees, (b) contractors, (c) those applying for employment and contracts and (d) other persons. [120318]

Ms Stuart: All those working for or on behalf of the Department may be called upon to produce a birth certificate, or other similar documentation, to prove their identity, eligibility under Civil Service nationality rules or age.


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