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Eurocorps and EUROFOR

Mr. Redwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many troops from (a) the UK and (b) other EU countries are committed to (i) Eurocorps and (ii) EUROFOR. [120820]

Mr. Hoon [holding answer 5 May 2000]: The UK has no troops committed to either the 5-nation (France, Germany, Belgium, Luxembourg and Spain) EUROCORPS or the 4-nation (France, Italy, Portugal and Spain) EUROFOR as a matter of course, though we have one Liaison Officer attached to HQ EUROCORPS.

Numbers of troops contributed to the forces in question by other countries are a matter for the countries concerned.

British Beef

Mr. Gerald Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what is his Department's policy regarding the supply of British beef for consumption by members of Her Majesty's armed forces. [121073]

Dr. Moonie: The supply of food for the armed forces has been contracted out to "3663" and we require them to seek the best price in the open market, consistent with meeting our quality standard. I am as keen, however, on seeing our servicemen and women eating British products as I am for our contractor to secure best value for money. In the case of British beef, since autumn of 1998 we have been supplying 100 per cent. British beef to our armed forces personnel based in the United Kingdom. Supplies for armed forces personnel based overseas are currently sourced from a number of countries.

ENVIRONMENT, TRANSPORT AND THE REGIONS

Health and Safety Executive

Mr. Bennett: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions what proportion of oral and written complaints made by members of the public were fully investigated by inspectors of health and safety in field offices of the Field Operations Division in fiscal year 1999-2000. [118410]

Mr. Meacher: The information requested can not be produced at this time, because full year data on inspectors' work for the year ended 31 March 2000 are not yet available. However, data on the number of complaints followed-up by staff in HSE's Field Operations Directorate for the years 1997-98 and 1998-99 are set out in the table. The table also shows, for information, the number of complaints investigated as a percentage of those received.

8 May 2000 : Column: 265W

Complaints followed-up by HSE's Field Operations Directorate by route of complaint

1997-981998-99
Telephone18,02018,686
Letter2,6553,042
Oral (other)322276
Complaints followed up as a percentage of complaints received72.676.7

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions what was the average number of businesses dealt with by band 3 inspectors in the Health and Safety Executive in the last 12 months for which figures are available. [120390]

Mr. Meacher [holding answer 2 May 2000]: Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Band 3 inspectors are used in the majority of sectors for which HSE has enforcement responsibility. Inspector contacts with businesses can vary considerably, depending on the sector and circumstances. Inspectors may contact the same business more than once during the course of the year, or may contact several operating sites owned by the same business. Also, a contact could involve an in depth audit, taking several days, or a short visit or meeting.

In total, HSE staff made 183,000 regulatory contacts with dutyholders and businesses in 1998-99, the last year for which figures are available. Of these, about 8,000 were made by administrative staff in HSE's Field Operations Directorate (FOD), and 33,000 by FOD inspectors other than Band 3 inspectors. A proportion of the rest may have involved inspectors other than Band 3 inspectors, but these could be disaggregated from the date only at disproportionate cost.

In total, approximately 500 Band 3 inspector staff years spent by HSE Operating Directorates and Divisions in 1998-99 on inspection, investigation and enforcement activity which would have generated the vast majority of regulatory contacts.

Air Traffic Control

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions when the New En-route Centre at Swanwick will be fully operational. [120786]

Mr. Mullin: The Swanwick Centre is scheduled to come into operation by spring 2002.

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions how many overseas consultancy projects have been undertaken by National Air Traffic Services in the last three years; and where these projects were undertaken. [120789]

Mr. Mullin: In the past three years, NATS has undertaken a total of 30 consultancy projects. Projects were undertaken in, or on behalf of, the following countries: Abu Dhabi, Antigua, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Eire, Finland, Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Libya, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Oman, Portugal, Singapore, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Syria, Switzerland, and the UK. In addition, NATS has participated in a number of consortiums on behalf of the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol).

8 May 2000 : Column: 266W

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions how many aircraft movements there were at UK airfields without air traffic control services in the last 12 months. [120788]

Mr. Mullin: There are 142 airports licensed by the CAA. Eighty-eight do not have air traffic control services but published data on aircraft movements are available only for 11 of these. For these 11 airports, there were 100,000 movements, both commercial and non-commercial. There were a total of 3.5 million aircraft movements at all UK airports for which data are available.

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions what is the average length of time taken to train an air traffic controller; how many are in training; and how many controllers are required to staff the airfields and centres under NATS control. [120784]

Mr. Mullin: Area Control (AC) Air Traffic Control Officers (ATCOs) receive 78 weeks training at the College of Air Traffic Control at Hurn followed by between 12 and 24 months on the job training before achieving validation. Airports ATCOs receive 52 weeks training at the College also followed by between 12 and 24 months on the job training before achieving validation. NATS has a total of 255 controllers currently in training (132 AC and 123 Airports--including part valid controllers). 436 controllers are required to staff the airfields under NATS control and 1,010 to staff the centres.

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions if he will list the suppliers of distress and diversion air traffic control to UK aircraft and aircraft using UK airspace. [120783]

Mr. Mullin: The Distress and Diversion (D&D) Air Traffic Control Service in the UK is provided to civil or military aircraft in distress or emergency in UK airspace. This service is supplied by RAF Air Traffic Control personnel located at the London Area and Terminal Control Centre (LATCC) and Scottish Area Control Centre (ScATCC).

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions how many air traffic controllers are needed to bring Heathrow up to full complement; and how many controllers are being trained at Swanwick. [120785]

Mr. Mullin: The total operational requirement for the Heathrow Visual Control Room and Thames Radar/SVFR is 61. There are currently 58 validated controllers. Two trainees are expected to validate within the next six to eight weeks together with one experienced ATCO undergoing retraining who is expected to regain validation within the same period. In addition, there are seven operationally valid Watch Managers at Heathrow.

The New En-Route Centre at Swanwick is scheduled to come into operation by spring 2002. Operational Conversion Training will begin in January 2001 to meet this requirement. A total of 380 Area Control ATCOs will undergo Operational Conversion Training prior to the operational date.

8 May 2000 : Column: 267W

Mrs. Dunwoody: To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Transport and the Regions if he will list those UK airports where (a) there is no air traffic control and (b) only (i) an air ground and (ii) flight information service is provided. [120787]

Mr. Mullin: The table lists UK airports where there is no air traffic control. Those with an Air/Ground service are indicated by A/G and those with a Flight Information Service, by FISO.

UK Airports
AndrewsfieldFISO
BarraFISO
BembridgeFISO
BeverleyA/G
BlackbusheFISO
BodminA/G
BournA/G
BroughA/G
CaernarfonA/G
CampbeltownFISO
ChalgroveA/G
Chichester GoodwoodFISO
Clacton-on-SeaA/G
Compton AbbasA/G
CumbernauldFISO
DenhamFISO
DerbyA/G
DunkeswellA/G
DuxfordFISO
EaglescottA/G
Earls ColneA/G
EdayA/G
ElmsettA/G
ElstreeFISO
Enniskillen St. AngeloFISO
Fair IsleA/G
FairoaksFISO
FenlandFISO
FifeA/G
FowlmereA/G
Full SuttonA/G
Glasgow Helipad SECCA/G
Halfpenny GreenFISO
HaverfordwestA/G
HucknallA/G
InvernessFISO
Islay Port EllenFISO
Lashenden HeadcornA/G
LeicesterA/G
Little GransdenA/G
LyddFISO
Manchester BartonFISO
NetherthorpeA/G
NewtownardsA/G
North RonaldsayA/G
Northampton SywellFISO
NottinghamA/G
Old BuckenhamA/G
Old SarumA/G
Oxford KidlingtonFISO
PanshangerA/G
Papa WestrayA/G
Penzance HeliportA/G
PerthA/G
PerranporthA/G
Peterborough/ConingtonA/G
RedhillFISO
RendcombA/G
Retford GamstonA/G
RochesterFISO
SandayA/G
Sandown Isle of WightA/G
SandtoftA/G
SeethingA/G
Sheffield CityA/G
Sherburn-in-ElmetA/G
ShipdhamFISO
ShobdonFISO
Sibson PeterboroughA/G
Silverstone HeliportA/G
SleapA/G
StaplefordFISO
StronsayA/G
SturgateA/G
TatenhillA/G
ThruxtonA/G
TingwallA/G
TireeFISO
Tresco HeliportA/G
TruroA/G
TurwestonA/G
UnstFISO
Wellesbourne MountfordFISO
WelshpoolA/G
WestrayA/G
WhalseyA/G
White WalthamFISO
WickenbyA/G

8 May 2000 : Column: 268W


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