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CCTV Schemes

Mr. Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many CCTV schemes have been funded by the Government in each of the last 10 years; and what is the planned expenditure in future years. [128386]

Mr. Charles Clarke [holding answer 3 July 2000]: The available information is shown in the table:

Funded schemes Cumulative totals
YearNumberValue £ millionNumberValue £ million
1994-9510651065
1995-960--1065
1996-972591736522
1997-981901555537
1998-99321.558738.5
1999-200034259.692998.5

Between 1994-95 and 1998-99, schemes were funded under a Home Office Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) Challenge Competition. From 1999-2000, schemes are funded under the Crime Reduction Programme CCTV initiative. Around £90 million remains to be allocated under this initiative, which runs to the end of December 2001.

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Information prior to 1994-95 is not available. CCTV measures under the earlier Safer Cities and Single Regeneration Budget Programmes (pre 1994) are not separately identifiable.

Special Units (Prisons)

Dr. Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many alarm bells were rung in each calendar year from 1986 to date (a) in the Special Close Supervision Unit in C Wing Parkhurst Prison, (b) in the remainder of Parkhurst Prison and (c) on average in the remainder of the other Special CS Units, with particular reference to Lincoln, Hull, Woodhill and Durham. [128618]

Mr. Boateng: The information requested in relation to Parkhurst could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. The information requested in relation to the special units at Lincoln or Hull is not available. In relation to Durham and Woodhill, the information requested is only available from 1998, when the Close Supervision Centre (CSC) system came into operation. Since 1998, there has been an annual average of four other occasions when the alarm bell has rung. At Woodhill, there has been an annual average of 12 occasions when the alarm bell has rung.

Young Offenders

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what health services are available to young people (a) sentenced and (b) remanded in custody; what specialist mental health services are available to repeat young offenders; and if he will make a statement. [128784]

Mr. Boateng: Young people held in prison custody, whether on remand or sentenced, have access to a full range of primary and specialist healthcare services through the institution's healthcare centre. Prison doctors will arrange for any necessary specialist treatment to be provided either within the institution or as an in or out patient at an outside hospital, as appropriate.

Young offenders needing in-patient treatment for mental disorder may be transferred to psychiatric hospitals. The care and treatment of inmates who do not need to be admitted to hospital is generally undertaken by prison healthcare staff under the supervision of visiting NHS specialists. Part of the substantial programme of reform to prison healthcare now underway is aimed at extending inreach from community mental health teams into prison to improve standards of care for such prisoners.

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what academic and vocational education and training is available to young people serving custodial sentences; and if he will make a statement. [128630]

Mr. Boateng: Education in Prison Service establishments is provided by education contractors. For all prisoners it focuses on a core curriculum of basic educational skills (literacy and numeracy), life and social skills, information technology and generic preparation for work. Prisoners of compulsory school age as defined in section 8 of the Education Act 1996 must be provided with at least 15 hours a week of education or training, plus five hours of physical education. For juveniles, life and social skills must include citizenship, sex and relationships education, and preparation for work.

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Education contractors are expected to support students taking General Certificate of Secondary Education examinations by liaising with their previous school.

Education for prisoners over school leaving age is entirely voluntary. Prisoners aged between 17 and 21 should be offered at least two hours a week of physical education.

There is a wide range of accredited vocational training available in Young Offender Institutions. Areas covered includes construction industry training; engineering; motor vehicle maintenance; industrial cleaning; catering; office skills; information technology; and agriculture and horticulture.

Life Tariffs

Mr. Stinchcombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners have a whole life tariff. [129219]

Mr. Boateng: There are at present 23 people in custody in England and Wales with whole life tariffs.

Hilda Murrell

Mr. Paul Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on progress made to establish the identity of the DNA tested by the Forensic Science Service in connection with the Hilda Murrell murder case. [128864]

Mr. Charles Clarke: I understand from West Mercia Constabulary that they are awaiting the outcome of investigations by the Forensic Science Service into the remaining forensic evidence.

Women Prisoners

Mr. Stinchcombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many women prisoners are held in prison establishments (a) over 25 miles, (b) over 50 miles and (c) over 100 miles from their committal Crown court. [129198]

Mr. Boateng: The following information is based on the distance that female prisoners are held from their committal court town. The Prison Service does not distinguish between prisoners who have been committed from Crown court or magistrates' court. The data were collected on 15 June 2000 and are set out in the table in the nearest format to that requested. There are in the region of 1,000 female prisoners held under 25 miles from their committal court town.

Distance from home areaNumber of female prisoners(19)
Between 25 and 50 miles800
Between 50 and 100 miles900
Over 100 miles600
Total over 25 miles2,300

(19) Rounded to nearest hundred


Prison Facilities

Mr. Stinchcombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisons have visiting areas with a supervised children's play area. [129200]

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Mr. Boateng: We estimate that there are around 90 play areas in visiting areas of prison establishments. Not all of these are supervised at all times.

Mr. Stinchcombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which prisons (a) have and (b) do not have prisoner representation on their anti-bullying committees. [129197]

Mr. Boateng: Prison Service Order number 1702 (PSO 1702) sets out the requirement for all prison establishments to have a local strategy to reduce bullying. It defines the elements that the strategy must contain and those that may be considered for inclusion.

The expected practice is that every establishment will have an anti-bullying committee. PSO 1702 suggests that committees may include prisoner representatives, but urges establishments to exercise caution to avoid these prisoners being viewed as informants. It also suggests there are alternative ways of enabling prisoners to put their views forward.

The statistics required are not held centrally and could not be obtained reliably in time to answer the question. A brief audit of copies of some local strategies held in Prison Service headquarters suggests that establishments have opted for the cautious approach and do not have prisoner representatives on their committee.

Incentives Scheme

Mr. Stinchcombe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department in which prisons, prisoners who maintain their innocence are ineligible for progression to the enhanced stage of the incentives and earned privileges scheme. [129201]

Mr. Boateng: Under the national framework for incentives and privileges the criteria for the earning and retention of privileges do not include acceptance of guilt by the prisoner but do include constructive participation in the sentence planning process.

Sentence planning may include the completion of an offending behaviour programme. If a prisoner then refuses to address his or her offending behaviour this will be of relevance in assessing his or her privilege level and may be sufficient to deny him or her enhanced status.


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