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Duty Roster

Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will publish the daily ministerial duty roster for his Department during the summer adjournment. [133057]

Mr. Rooker: It is not normal practice of Government to publish the daily ministerial duty roster. The Department will ensure that it has sufficient cover through the summer recess in line with the requirements of the Ministerial Code.

Working Families Tax Credit

Mr. Love: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what plans he has to introduce a disregard for Working Families Tax Credit when assessing an individual's entitlement to Housing Benefit; and if he will make a statement. [133150]

Angela Eagle: Limited situations exist where Working Families Tax Credit (WFTC) is partly disregarded in the assessment of Housing Benefit (HB). People who work 30 hours a week or more and who have children may get a partial disregard of WFTC if their earnings are very low. In addition, people with relevant child care costs which cannot be fully met from earnings can have the balance of those costs deducted from WFTC. We have no plans to introduce a wider disregard of WFTC.

SERPS

Mr. Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will estimate for (a) 2000, (b) 2001 and (c) 2002 the number of men turning 65 years who will receive (i) 0 to 25 per cent., (ii) 26 to 50 per cent., (iii) 51 to 75 per cent. and (iv) 76 to 100 per cent. of the maximum SERPS pension; [133044]

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Mr. Rooker: The information requested is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available in the tables.

The tables are based on current statistics for recently retired pensioners.

Numbers of women aged 60 and men aged 65 with the relevant percentage of the maximum SERPS pension payable in their own right, including cases with a zero entitlement to a SERPS pension
Thousand

All men aged 65All women aged 60
All cases256.9242.6
0 to 25 per cent.97.2206.3
26 to 50 per cent.74.424.4
51 to 75 per cent.66.39.4
76 to 100 per cent.19.02.5

The numbers of women aged 60 and men aged 65 receiving a SERPS pension in their own right, excluding cases with a zero entitlement to a SERPS pension

Thousand
All cases370.1
Men aged 65227.6
Women aged 60142.5

Note:

Figures are rounded to the nearest hundred

Source:

5 per cent. sample from the Pension Strategy Computer System as at 30 September 1999


Mr. Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate the monetary value of 25 per cent. of the maximum SERPS pension for each of the years 2000 to 2003. [133042]

Mr. Rooker: The information is in the table.

Estimates of the monetary value of 25 per cent. of the maximum SERPS pension for each of the years 2000 to 2003

Maximum additional pension (£ pw)25 per cent. of maximum
2000-01124.9531.23
2001-02130.9632.74
2002-03134.5533.64
2003-04138.0834.52

Notes:

1. Figures beyond 2001-02 are based on projected changes in earnings and prices.

2. The upper earnings limit for National Insurance contributions is assumed to rise in line with prices beyond 2001-02.

Source:

Estimates provided by the Government Actuary's Department


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Personal Pensions

Mr. Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security if he will estimate the number of group personal pension plans. [132943]

Mr. Rooker: The information is not collected.

PFI Contracts

Mr. Alan Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security in how many of his Department's PFI contracts KPMG has been an adviser. [132858]

Mr. Rooker: The Department has two PFI projects; PRIME (Private Sector Resource Initiative for Management of the Estate) and ACCORD (Access to Corporate Data).

KPMG are providing input into the Network and Office Services project (NOSP) strand of the ACCORD programme. The NOSP stand is at the Invitation to Tender stage and is not yet a formal contract. Charterhouse are providing overall strategic direction across the ACCORD Outsourcing, CSR and NOSP strands.

KPMG have not provided advice to the PRIME project.

Occupational Pensions

Mr. Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many occupational pension schemes are in existence; and how many of them were (a) defined benefit and (b) defined contribution in each of the last five years. [132944]

Mr. Rooker: The information is not available in the format requested as the information is not collected on an annual basis. Such information as is available is as follows.

At the end of 1995 there were around 151,000 occupational pension schemes. 37,980 defined benefit, 109,440 defined contributions and 3,580 schemes which have elements of both defined benefit and defined contribution.



State Pensions

Mr. Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security how many women who turned 60 years in each of the last three years had a full basic state pension (a) in their own right and (b) by virtue of their husband's national insurance contribution. [132972]

Mr. Rooker: The information is in the tables.

Retirement pensioners--women aged 60 with full amount of basic state pension based on their own and/or their late husband's contributions
Thousand

March
199719981999
All cases54.856.649.8
Based on own contributions32.935.230.3
Based on own and/or husband's contributions21.921.519.6


27 Jul 2000 : Column: 843W

Retirement pensioners--women aged 60 with 60 per cent. of basic state pension based on their own and/or their husband's contributions
Thousand

MarchAll cases
199735.4
199836.1
199935.5

Note:

The figures are rounded to the nearest hundred

Source:

5 per cent. sample from the Pension Strategy Computer System at 30 September 1999


Mr. Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security (1) if he will estimate for (a) 2000, (b) 2001 and (c) 2002 how many women turning 60 will receive (i) 0 to 25 per cent., (ii) 26 to 50 per cent., (iii) 51 to 75 per cent. and (iv) 76 to 100 per cent. of the basic state pension; [132949]

Mr. Rooker: Information is not available in the format requested. Such information as is available is in the table.

Women aged 60 and men aged 65 with the relevant percentage of the basic State pension(1)
Thousand

All men aged 65All women aged 60
All Cases256.9242.6
0 to 25%2.721.6
26 to 50%9.456.1
51 to 75%10.983.4
76 to 100%233.981.5

(1) As Government Actuary's Department does not produce forecasts for the future we have produced estimates on current data

Notes:

1. The figures are rounded to the nearest hundred, and include cases with a zero entitlement to the basic State pension

2. Married women with a 60 per cent. Category B pension are shown in the 51-75 per cent. bracket

Source:

5 per cent. sample from the Pension Strategy Computer System at 30 September 1999


Statutory Maternity Pay

Ms Harman: To ask the Secretary of State for Social Security what percentage of women's average earnings flat rate Statutory Maternity Pay constituted in each year since 1970. [133139]

Mr. Bayley: Statutory Maternity Pay was introduced in April 1987. The table shows the percentage of women's average earnings that the flat rate of statutory maternity pay has constituted in each year from that date.

Ratio of women's earnings to flat rate of Statutory Maternity Pay

Percentage
April 198728.5
April 198827.7
April 198926.8
April 199026.5
April 199128.0
April 199227.2
April 199327.1
April 199426.8
April 199527.9
April 199627.9
April 199727.7
April 199827.4
April 199926.8

Note:

Average earnings figures are for full-time female manual employees and come from the New Earnings Survey, taken in April each year.


27 Jul 2000 : Column: 844W


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