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Education Budget (Sefton)

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment what percentage of the total education budget of Sefton Metropolitan Borough was spent on administration in each year from 1992 to 1998. [98597]

Ms Estelle Morris: For the years from 1992 to 1998, the percentage of the total education budget of Sefton Metropolitan Borough which was spent on administration was as follows:

YearPercentage
1992-933.7
1993-944.0
1994-952.9
1995-962.8
1996-972.8
1997-982.8

New Deal (Yorkshire)

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment how many people in (a) Don Valley, (b) Doncaster and (c) South Yorkshire will benefit from the extended New Deal. [98455]

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Ms Jowell: The Chancellor announced in his pre-Budget report that the existing New Deal 25 plus pilots should be extended until March 2001. This will give us a valuable opportunity to learn more lessons to inform the detail of the enhanced New Deal for people aged 25 and over which we intend to introduce in April 2001. There are currently two pilots in South Yorkshire, but we cannot at this stage say how many additional people in those areas will be helped as a result of this extension, because there are a number of detailed issues which we need to explore on a pilot by pilot basis.

Civil Servants (Darlington)

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment how many civil servants are employed at his Department's offices in Darlington; and how many he expects to be employed there in (a) 2000, (b) 2001 and (c) 2002. [99054]

Mr. Wills: The number of civil servants employed by the Department for Education and Employment at its headquarters office in Darlington as at 1 April 1999 was 498. Staffing projections for future years are not available. However, when the Secretary of State spoke to staff in Darlington and Runcorn, in 1997, he indicated, that for the lifetime of this Parliament, there would be a continuing need for both sites.

Education Initiatives

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will list for each of the education initiatives launched since May 1997 and for each financial year, the amount of departmental expenditure which has been identified as additional to that which would have been incurred as part of normal operational activity. [98835]

Mr. Wills [holding answer 22 November 1999]: The figures for central government spending on education in England which were published in DfEE's 1999 Departmental Report together with the year on year increases, are in the following table. They do not include Ofsted or local authority expenditure on education.

Year£ million
1996-9711,266
1997-9811,642
1998-9912,054
1999-200013,474
2000-0115,282
2001-0216,617

Note:

1997-98 does not include the £527 million which was transferred from local to central government spending in that year only for nursery vouchers.


These figures show that, by 2001-02, we will be spending nearly £5.4 billion more from central government resources on education than was spent under the previous administration in 1996-97. This is as a result of the extra £16 billion for total education spending in England over the years 1999-2000, 2000-01 and 2001-02 provided by the Comprehensive Spending Review, and the extra £400 million for England over this period from the Capital Modernisation Fund as announced

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in the March 1999 Budget. In addition, over £140 million of extra resources have been allocated for capital in English schools as part of the pre-Budget package.

Details of DfEE initiatives launched since May 1997 can be found in the Department's 1998 and 1999 annual reports (Cm 3910 and Cm 4202), copies of which have been laid in the Library.

Dyslexia

Mr. Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment what recent guidance he has given to education authorities about the extent and nature of support to be given to pupils affected by dyslexia. [99419]

Jacqui Smith: Under the Education Act 1996, schools and local education authorities (LEAs) have a duty to identify and make suitable provision for all children with special educational needs, including children with dyslexia. The Code of Practice on the Identification and Assessment of Special Educational Needs, which came into effect on 1 September 1994, gives guidance to schools and LEAs on how to meet this duty. Paragraphs 3.60 to 3.63 provide guidance on specific learning difficulties and have particular reference to dyslexia. The Code is currently being revised to update the guidance and provide examples of good practice, with an increased emphasis on early identification and support.

To assist schools in recognising dyslexia, we have produced simple guidance which provides hints to primary school teachers to help them identify children who may be dyslexic. In addition, the Department has recently provided a grant to help the British Dyslexia Association produce a schools resource pack entitled "Achieving dyslexia friendly schools". Two copies of the pack have been distributed to all local education authorities in England .

Education Action Zones

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment when the annual audited accounts of each education action zone in Round 1 were due to be submitted to his Department. [99231]

Ms Estelle Morris: The accounts are not submitted to the Department. The National Audit Office will lay the 25 sets of accounts before Parliament. The NAO expects to lay the first of these in December.

Capital Expenditure (Schools)

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will state for each financial year to 2001-02, how much of the money announced for capital expenditure on schools (a) amounts to additional spending above the level included in expenditure plans announced before May 1997 and (b) is included in the additional expenditure announced in the Comprehensive Spending Review (Cm. 4011). [98644]

Jacqui Smith [holding answer 22 November 1999]: Since May 1997, we have announced for England £1.085 billion for the New Deal for Schools programme; £90 million for class size reduction and heating systems and outside toilet replacements; and an additional £660 million in PFI credits. All of those amounts are additional to the £19 billion increase in UK education

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spending announced in the Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR). As well as those increases, the Chancellor's Pre-Budget Statement this month announced a further £143 million for PFI credits and New Deal for Schools funding in England.

The total expenditure on schools buildings in the three year CSR period is £5.5 billion, following the additional funds announced in the Chancellor's Pre-Budget Statement. This breaks down as follows: £1.3 billion in 1999-2000, £1.6 billion in 2000-01 and £1.9 billion in 2001-02, plus an estimate of additional contributions from local education authorities and school governors. In 1996-97, planned central Government expenditure in the main schools capital programme was £661 million (as set out in the Department's Report in March 1996, Cm 3210).

Capital spend per pupil has increased from £348 in 1994-98 to an estimated £780 in 1998-02.

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will list separately for each financial year covered by the Comprehensive Spending Review (Cm. 4011) for all capital expenditure on schools (a) the amounts to be spent in the form of cash grants to local education authorities and schools, (b) the amounts to be spent in the form of credit approvals and (c) amounts to be spent by other means. [98653]

Jacqui Smith [holding answer 22 November 1999]: In 1999-2000, the Department expects to allocate £454 million in credit approvals out of the £713 million for the main schools capital programme. The remaining £259 million will be given out as grant, including that for Voluntary Aided and Grant Maintained Schools. The main schools capital programme will total £963 million in 2000-01 and £1.3 billion in 2001-02. The proportion of credit approvals for those two years has not yet been finalised. In addition to the main programme, the Department will be providing grant funding of over £200 million in each of the three years for the National Grid for learning, class sizes reduction, Sure Start and specialist schools. The Department will also be providing funding under the New Deal for Schools of £250 million in 1999-2000, £293 million in 2000-01 and £250 million in 2001-02; and PFI credits of £350 million in 1999-2000, £350 million in 2000-01 and £450 million in 2001-02.

From April 2000, the Department will be providing nearly £200 million each year to schools in the form of formula grant. Schools will also have the opportunity to bid for £30 million of seed challenge funding for innovative investment programmes.

We expect the Department's funding to be enhanced by partnership contributions from local education authorities and school governors of £800 million over the CSR period.

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment what funds allocated from the windfall tax levy to the New Deal for Schools were counted as part of the additional expenditure on education announced as part of the Comprehensive Spending Review (Cm. 4011). [99424]

Mr. Blunkett [holding answer 23 November 1999]: None. The £1.085 billion for the New Deal for Schools announced in July 1997 is additional to the £19 billion

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increase in UK education spending announced in the Comprehensive Spending Review. A further £43 million for the New Deal for Schools was announced by the Chancellor in the Pre-Budget statement on 9 November, together with the extension of the PFI credits by £100 million.


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