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Pupil Expenditure

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will list for (a) Great Britain and (b) each local authority real terms expenditure per pupil in (i) 1979, (ii) 1990 and (iii) each year since 1992 for which figures are available. [147252]

Ms Estelle Morris: The information requested on local education authority real terms expenditure per pupil is contained in tables, copies of which have been placed in the Library. The tables cover England, for which I have ministerial responsibility. Information based on net institutional expenditure is given for each local education authority for 1979-80, 1990-91 and each year from 1992-93 to 1998-99, the latest year for which this information is currently available. In addition, further tables for each local education authority based on funding

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per pupil, through the education standard spending assessment and central government grants, have been provided for the years 1997-98 to 2000-01.

Graduates (Starting Salaries)

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment if he will list the average starting salary for graduates in each employment sector in each year since 1974. [148710]

Mr. Wicks: Information on the average starting salary for each employment sector is not available. The table shows the median of the starting salaries paid by employers to graduates from 1974 to 2000 from the Association of Graduate Recruiters' Annual Graduate Salaries and Vacancies Surveys. 50 per cent. of employers in the sample pay less than this and we do not have figures for the lowest starting salary or the statistical mean. Members of the Association of Graduate Recruiters tend to be large employers recruiting graduates to professional and fast track managerial jobs and probably pay higher starting salaries than the overall average, but information on the latter is not available. A more detailed breakdown by sector than industrial and non-industrial is not available from this survey. I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to him on 8 January 2001, Official Report, column 403W, for figures on the starting pay for honours

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graduate teachers which from April will be £20,000 in inner London. Figures for other sectors are not collected centrally.

£

Employment sector
YearNew graduate median starting salariesIndustrialNon-industrial
19741,905n/an/a
19752,423n/an/a
19762,735n/an/a
19773,000n/an/a
19783,435n/an/a
19793,970n/an/a
19804,745n/an/a
19815,240n/an/a
19825,690n/an/a
19836,125n/an/a
19846,680n/an/a
19857,300n/an/a
19868,000n/an/a
19878,500n/an/a
19889,300n/an/a
198910,32710,50010,000
199011,50011,50011,250
199112,50012,50012,000
199212,80013,00012,500
199313,00413,22512,950
199413,60013,69713,600
199514,36214,00014,000
199614,75015,00014,500
199715,50015,50016,000
199816,60016,50017,000
199917,40017,25017,850
2000(37)18,000(37)18,100(37)18,000

n/a = not available

(37) These figures are provisional (from 2000 survey)

Source:

Institute for Employment Studies/Association of Graduate Recruiters


Teachers' Pay

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment, pursuant to the answer of 29 January 2001, Official Report, column 33W, what the average salary has been, including relevant threshold payments, for (a) primary teachers, (b) secondary teachers, (c) graduates in other sectors and (d) all non-manual employees in each year since 1974. [148921]

Ms Estelle Morris [holding answer 6 February 2001]: It is estimated that the average pay of a full-time qualified teacher (including heads and deputy heads) in the maintained nursery, primary and secondary sector at April 2001 will be £27,900 (including the post-threshold pay scale). There is nothing further to add to the previous answer about teacher salaries.

Average gross weekly earnings for full-time non-manual adults in Great Britain, whose pay in the survey pay period was not affected by absence, in April each year, are as follows:

Year£
197028.2
197130.9
197234.4
197338.1
197443.5
197556.3
197667.6
197773.7
197882.7
197992.4
1980115.7
1981133.8
1982146.0
1983(38)159.4
1983(38)159.1
1984172.2
1985184.6
1986200.9
1987217.4
1988240.7
1989264.9
1990291.2
1991312.5
1992334.6
1993349.5
1994359.5
1995371.6
1996389.3
1997(39)406.8
1998(39)425.2
1999433.1
2000452.4

(38) 1970 to first row for 1983 compiled on basis of men aged 21+ and women aged 18+, second row for 1983 onwards compiled on basis of employees on adult rates.

(39) 1997 and 1998 data include late receipts.

Source:

New Earnings Survey.


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Press Releases

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment how many press releases were issued by his Department in the financial years (a) 1996-97, (b) 1997-98, (c) 1998-99 and (d) 1999-2000; how many have been issued in the current financial year; and what his estimate is of the total number for the current financial year. [149253]

Mr. Wills [holding answer 8 February 2001]: The number of press releases issued by my Department is as follows:

Financial yearNumber
1996-97382
1997-98538
1998-99582
1999-2000596
2000-01 (to end January 2001)523

It is not possible at this time to give an estimate of what the final figure will be for the financial year 2000-01.

Policy and Strategy Units

Mr. Tyrie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment when his strategy division was established; which of its reports are placed in the public domain; how many departmental or non-departmental special advisers participate in its work; how many regular (a) non-departmental and (b) departmental staff participate in its work; and how many of these work for the division on a full-time basis. [150367]

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Mr. Wills: The strategy division was originally created in 1996 to provide the Department with the capability to identify and plan for the external changes, developments and potential challenges that education, training and employment policy would need to take account of in coming years. One of its first tasks was to co-ordinate and produce the document: "Learning and Working together for the future--A strategic framework to 2002", which was published by the Department in November 1998. This was given a wide public circulation and remains available.

No special advisers participate in the division's work, through freelance consultants are occasionally used to provide specialist knowledge and support. Currently 25 full-time staff work in the division.

Mr. Tyrie: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment when his policy innovation unit was established; which of its reports are placed in the public domain; how many departmental or non-departmental special advisers participate in its work; how many regular (a) non-departmental and (b) departmental staff participate in its work; and how many of these work for the unit on a full-time basis. [150368]

Mr. Wills: The policy innovation unit in the DfEE was established in January 2000. Staff have been recruited from a variety of private, voluntary and public sector backgrounds to work alongside a core civil service team, looking at new policy ideas for Ministers and senior officials. Strategy and policy units typically provide internal advice to Ministers. Any resulting reports will be published by the Department, and not the unit. No departmental or non-departmental special advisers work in the unit. The unit currently has 13 externally recruited team members. Of these, four are on casual civil service contracts (all full-time), two are on secondment (both part-time) and seven are working as consultants (two full-time and five part-time). The unit also has five departmental staff, all of whom are full-time.

Teachers

Mr. Simon Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment what the wastage rate for teachers in each of the last five years was; what the average earnings of teachers in each of the last five years were; and how many days on average were lost per teacher due to sickness in each of the last five years. [150473]

Ms Estelle Morris: The statistics on full-time and part-time teachers leaving the maintained schools sector in England for the last five years for which data are available are as follows:

Financial yearLeavers(40),(41)Rate(42)
1994-9532,5107.8
1995-9631,1507.4
1996-9733,1507.9
1997-9834,2508.2
1998-99(43)27,5706.6

(40) Teachers leaving the maintained nursery, primary, secondary, special and PRU sector including those moving to the FE, HEE or the independent schools sector.

Teachers retiring but then rejoining the maintained nursery, primary, secondary, special and PRU sector have not been included in the figures. Teachers retiring and then joining the FE, HE or the independent schools sector are included.

Teachers barred from service and dying in service are included

(41) The number of teachers leaving on early or ill-health retirement has now stabilised at a lower level, following the reform of the Teachers Pensions Scheme in 1997.

(42) Leavers expressed as a percentage of teachers in post at the start of the year shown.

(43) Provisional.


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Average salaries of full-time teachers in the maintained schools sector in England for the last five years were as follows:

£
March 199622,180
March 199722,920
March 199823,570
March 199924,460
March 200025,320

Note:

The March 2000 salary is estimated by increasing the March 1999 figure by the 1 April 1999 pay rise of 3.5 per cent.


It is estimated that the average pay of a full-time qualified teacher (including heads and deputy heads) in the maintained nursery, primary and secondary sector at April 2001 will be £27,900 (including the post threshold pay scale).

From April 2001 new graduate recruits can expect to earn £17,000 a year (up 6 per cent. from the previous year) and starting salaries in Inner London will rise to £20,000 (up 9 per cent. from the previous year).

In calendar year 1999, full-time and part-time teachers in maintained schools in England took an estimated average of five days' sick leave. This is the only year for which data are available.

The number of regular teachers in maintained schools in England increased by 6,900 between January 1998 and January 2000,

There was a growth of more than 2,000 in the number of people training to be teachers between 1999-2000 and 2000-01, the first such increase since 1992-93.

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Employment what estimate he has made of (a) the number of qualified supply teachers and (b) the number of these that were in post in schools on 17 January for each of the last five years. [150091]

Ms Estelle Morris: The number of qualified supply teachers is not collected centrally.

The number of qualified short-term supply teachers on contracts of under one month employed in maintained schools in England for the whole day, on the third Thursday in January over the last five years, is as follows:

Year
199612,600
199713,600
199813,100
199914,100
200016,700

Note:

All numbers have been rounded to the nearest 100

A number of factors may have affected the demand for short term supply teachers in January 2000 including the requirement for schools to give teachers in their induction year a 10 per cent. reduction in timetable, and the flu epidemic that some LEAs reported at the time.

Supply, temporary and agency teachers on a contract of at least one month cannot be separately identified from teachers in regular service.The number of regular teachers (ie excluding short term supply) in maintained schools in England increased by 6,900 between January 1998 and January 2000.

There was a growth of more than 2000 in the number of people training to be teachers between 1999-2000 and 2000-01, the first such increase since 1992-93.


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