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Select Committee on Public Accounts Appendices to the Minutes of Evidence



APPENDIX 2


SUPPLEMENTARY MEMORANDUM SUBMITTED BY THE KEEPER OF THE PRIVY PURSE, BUCKINGHAM PALACE (PAC 2000-2001/37)

1.   Which office holders of the Royal Collection Trust pay rent, and at what percentage? What is the range, in money terms, of these rents? Which of these persons are members of Royal Household Pension Scheme?

  No office holders in the Royal Collection Trust (RCT) are provided with accommodation. Employees of the Household's Royal Collection Department, which is funded by the RCT, and Royal Collection Enterprises Limited provided with residential accommodation are as follows.
 
Rent paid
Rent as percentage of salary
Custodian of the Windsor Store
Y
16.7%
Registrar, Royal Archives
Y
16.7%
Deputy Registrar, Royal Archives
N
Assistant Registrar, Royal Archives
Y
16.7%
Curator, Photographic Collection
Y
16.7%
Librarian
Y
16.7%
Armourer
N
Deputy Visitor Manager
Y
12.1%
Surveyor, The Queen's Pictures
N
Inventory Clerk
Y
16.7%
Administrator
N
Director of the Royal Collection
N
Deputy Curator of the Print Room
N
Furniture Conservator
Y
16.7%
Exhibitions and Maintenance Conservator
N

  The rents range from £3,128 to £18,694 per annum. Those who do not pay rent entered into their contracts of employment before the Household assumed responsibility for Property Services. Rent is now set to equate to 16.7 per cent of before tax (ie gross) salary paid out of after tax earnings. Because the abatements are from gross salary, the actual deduction is higher than 16.7 per cent to take account of the tax effect.

  Of the 15 listed above, 11 are members of the Royal Household Pension Scheme. However, while no pension contributions are made for Civil List employees (until 1 April 2001), in line with normal past practice for Civil Service pension schemes, the Royal Collection Trust pays an employer's pension contribution of 16.2 per cent of salary. No Royal Collection employees have joined the Royal Household Pension Scheme since 1991.

2.   What is the range in money terms of rents paid for Grace and Favour accommodation in the Occupied Royal Palaces? How many residents pay no rent? Please provide a graph of current rents, showing the number at each level of rent?

  It may be helpful to start by explaining that the phrase "grace and favour accommodation" is used to describe accommodation provided by the Sovereign on an ex-gratia basis. Where the occupant is employed it is referred to as "job related accommodation" and where the occupant was employed as "pensioner accommodation".

  Rents (or salary abatements) range from nil to £45,784 per annum. Seventy residents pay no rent and 164 pay rent. An analysis of the 70 who pay no rent or abatement is:
No
Members of the Royal Family
7
Private Secretaries and Officials in The Queen's Household
13
Private Secretaries and Officials in other Households
4
Domestic staff in The Queen's Household
1
Domestic staff in other Households
5
Stable staff looking after the Civil List carriages and horses
0
The Queen's private staff
0
Chauffeurs in The Queen's Household
0
Chauffeurs in other Households
1
Staff in The Queen's Household responsible for the maintenance of the Occupied Palaces Estate
1
Gardeners in The Queen's Household
0
Gatekeepers and security staff
2
Firepatrolmen in The Queen's Household
0
Craftsmen and porters in The Queen's Household
2
Royal Collection Enterprises staff
0
Crown Estate gardeners
0
Military Knights at Windsor Castle (Pensioners)
13
Pensioners
21
Royal Collection curatorial staff
0
70

  When employees and pensioners pay no rent it is generally because they entered into their contracts of employment or licences for occupation before the Royal Household assumed responsibility for Property Services and completed its review of residential accommodation.

  For employees who pay no rent the provision of residential accommodation was taken into account in setting their salaries.

  Members of the Royal Family pay no rent because they are provided with accommodation in order to undertake official duties on behalf of The Queen. The Military Knights receive accommodation in return for performing ceremonial duties for which they would otherwise be paid.

  Of the 164 employees and pensioners who pay rent or salary abatements, the salary abatements for 17 employees benefit the Royal Collection Department or a Royal Household other than The Queen's, rather than public funds.

  A bar chart showing the current rent bands is given below.

rents.gif

3.   Please provide a list of non-employees occupying Grace and Favour accommodation, with details of the accommodation and indicating whether rent is paid.

  The only non-employees who occupy residential accommodation are pensioners. Details are given in the table below. Seven Members of the Royal Family have been excluded from the table because they are provided with accommodation in order to undertake official duties on behalf of The Queen. The 13 Military Knights have been excluded because they receive their accommodation in return for performing duties for which they would otherwise be paid.

  A list of the pensioners occupying accomodation is given below along with details of the accommodation and whether or not rent is paid.

Position when employed
Reception Rooms
Bedrooms
Rent Y/N
Photocopy Operator*
2
3
Y
Head Chauffeur
1
2
Y
Deputy Head Chauffeur
1
2
Y
Head Warden
1
2
Y
Senior Footman
1
2
Y
Chief Upholsterer
1
2
Y
Plumber*
3
3
Y
Queen's Page
1
3
N
Harness Cleaner
1
2
Y
Carriage Cleaner
1
2
Y
Courier
1
2
Y
Widow of Royal Mews Groom
1
2
N
Widow of Royal Mews Groom
1
2
N
Security Officer, Royal Mews
2
1
Y
Girl Groom
1
2
N
Horse Box Driver
1
2
Y
Nanny+
1
2
N
Chief Accountant & Paymaster*
2
3
Y
Head Gardener
1
2
Y
Widow of Deputy Palace Steward
1
1
N
Gamekeeper
2
3
N
Widow of Gatekeeper
2
2
N
Principal, Foundation of St Catherine+
2
3
N
Secretary to the Private Secretary
1
3
Y
Cousin of The Queen+
3
3
N
Administrative Officer
1
3
Y
Lady Clerk to the Marshal of the Diplomatic Corps
1
2
N
Personnel Officer
1
3
Y
Comptroller, Lord Chamberlain's Office
2
3
N
Palace Attendant
1
1
Y
Groom
1
1
N
Head Coachman
1
2
N
Widow of Caretaker
1
2
N
Accountant, Privy Purse
1
2
N
Comptroller of Stores
3
4
Y
Groom
1
2
Y
Widow of Royal Collection employee
3
3
N
Press Secretary to Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother
3
5
N
Assistant to the Master of the Household G Branch
2
3
Y
Stud Groom
2
2
N
Gardener
1
1
Y
Gatekeeper
2
2
N
Gatekeeper
2
3
N

  *  Due to move to smaller accommodation when available.

+  Not previously an official employee (ie provided with grace and favour accommodation).

4.   In the last full year before the Windsor fire, what were the annual receipts from charges to visitors to:

    (a)  Royal Collection Trust (State Apartments);

    (b)  St. George's Chapel;

    (c)  Privy Purse Charitable Trust (Queen Mary's Dolls House);

    (d)  Others.

    What would these receipts be worth at 1999-2000 values?

  Receipts from visitors to Windsor Castle are given below. In the case of the Royal Collection Trust (in respect of the State Apartments) and the Privy Purse Charitable Trust (in respect of Queen Mary's Dolls House), the figures are receipts net of costs of collection taken from management accounts for the year to 31 October 1992. The figures for St. George's Chapel are receipts net of costs of collection taken from the audited accounts for the year to 31 August 1992.


1991-92
Actua
£000
1991-92
Inflated
£000
1999-2000
Actual
£000
Royal Collection Trust1,660 1,9981,888
St George's Chapel573 695859
Privy Purse Charitable Trust280 344281
Grant-in-aid00 2,386
Total2,513 3,0375,414

  The second column shows figures for 1991-92 inflated using the retail price index to 1999-2000 pounds. In negotiation the Dean and Chapter of St. George's Chapel sought compensation to cover increased staff and maintenance costs following the envisaged increase in visitor numbers to the Chapel from about 400,000 per annum to 1.2 million.

5.   How much was received from visitors in each year since the Windsor Castle fire for:

    (a)  admission to Windsor Castle;

    (b)  admission to Buckingham Palace.

6.   How much was paid in each year since the fire from visitor income, at Windsor Castle for:

    (a)  costs of collection;

    (b)  management fee for Royal Collection Enterprises Ltd;

  and what was each year's allocation to:

    (a)  St George's Chapel?

    (b)  Privy Purse Charitable Trust?

    (c)  Royal Collection Trust?

7.   Since the Windsor Castle fire, how has each year's visitor income at Buckingham Palace disbursed?

8.   How much was provided for fire restoration work at Windsor each year by:

    1.  Buckingham Palace;

    2.  Windsor Castle (Royal Collection Trust).
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
Total
Year ended 31 March
£000
£000
£000
£000
£000
£000
£000
£000
Windsor Castle
Admissions income—Pre Precincts charges—9 months
1,941
0
0
0
0
0
0
Admissions income—Precincts charges
754
5,309
5,891
6,355
6,556
8,264
7,530
Admissions income—QMDH charges
272
200
301
278
300
0
0
2,967
5,509
6,192
6,633
6,856
8,264
7,530
Cost of collection
1,194
1,475
1,498
1,445
1,477
1,650
1,979
Royal Collection Enterprises Ltd management fee
57
100
115
121
127
131
137
1,716
3,934
4,579
5,067
5,252
6,483
5,414
Allocated:
Privy Purse Charitable Trust
42
68
250
257
263
281
281
1,442
St George's Chapel
180
720
741
829
842
897
859
5,068
Royal Collection Trust
1,394
1,541
1,680
1,724
1,766
1,889
1,888
11,882
Windsor Castle fire restoration
100
1,605
1,908
2,257
2,381
3,416
105
11,772
Property section grant-in-aid
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,281
2,281
1,716
3,934
4,579
5,067
5,252
6,483
5,414
32,445
Buckingham Palace
Admissions income
2,027
2,662
2,948
2,811
2,351
2,505
2,350
Retail gross profit
1,398
1,857
1,579
1,372
934
900
956
3,425
4,519
4,527
4,183
3,285
3,405
3,306
Cost of collection—admissions
837
1,201
1,228
1,071
1,213
1,389
1,443
Cost of collection—retail
310
409
366
340
268
240
390
Royal Collection Enterprises Ltd management fee
100
125
105
110
115
120
125
2,178
2,784
2,828
2,662
1,689
1,656
1,348
Allocated:
Windsor Castle fire restoration
2,178
2,784
2,828
2,662
1,689
1,563
14
13,718
Royal Collection Trust
93
1,334
1,427
2,178
2,784
2,828
2,662
1,689
1,656
1,348
15,145
Net trading surpluses for fire restoration—
Windsor Castle
100
1,605
1,908
2,257
2,381
3,416
105
11,772
Buckingham Palace
2,178
2,784
2,828
2,662
1,689
1,563
14
13,718
2,278
4,389
4,736
4,919
4,070
4,979
119
25,490
Interest income
78
203
313
108
0
0
0
702
Costs incurred directly by Grant-in-aid
(99)
0
(61)
(5)
(2)
0
0
--167
Total contribution to the fire restoration
2,257
4,592
4,988
5,022
4,068
4,979
119
26,025
Total received by Grant-in-aid
751
3,000
6,529
9,486
5,905
235
119
26,025

  The timing of the generation of income to fund the restoration and of the expenditure to pay for it were not the same, reflected in the timing differences between "Total contribution to the fire restoration" and "Total received by the Grant-in-aid" shown above. Initially income exceeded expenditure, with interest earned on the reserve carried forward. Towards the end of the project expenditure was incurred before the income was received, with the Royal Collection Trust borrowing to bridge the gap.

9.   A Parliamentary Question by Mr Alan Williams and Reply dated 31 October shows an ongoing exceptional work programme at Windsor updating the figures to those used in the C&AG's Report (1998-99 prices). Please deduct the figures in the Reply from those in Figure 8 of the Report to show the trend of non-exceptional maintenance.

  Set out below is a restatement of property maintenance expenditure excluding exceptional work at 1998-99 prices.

£m
1991-92
13.46
1992-93
9.01
1993-94
7.13
1994-95
7.49
1995-96
8.84
1996-97
7.21
1997-98
4.55
1998-99
6.16
1999-2000
6.25

  As well as the exceptional cost of rewiring Windsor Castle, exceptional fire protection work, with total expenditure over the period of £6.6 million on automatic fire detection and £6.4 million on fire compartmentation, has been excluded. Details are given in attachment A.

10.   Why are 160 Royal Household Staff paid from Grant-in-aid, especially the 56 working for Departments other than the Property Section? Do any of them have Grace and Favour accommodation, and if so, how many pay rent?

  The roles of the 163 Royal Household staff paid from the Grant-in-aid are set out on pages 12 and 13 of the Annual Report (attachment B). The 56 staff who work for Departments other than the Property Section are involved in maintenance activities. The craftsmen maintain and repair furnishings in official areas of the Palaces as explained on page 32 of the Annual Report. The porters and non-domestic cleaners move furniture, prepare rooms for various state and official functions and for building work, and undertake heavy duty cleaning (as explained on page 30 of the Annual Report). The staff at St James's Palace State Apartments undertake similar maintenance, furniture moving and custodial functions.

  Of the 163 staff, 47 are housed and 44 of these pay rent. The remaining three are long serving employees, one of whom retired in December 2000.

11.   What is the rationale for rent from Grace and Favour accommodation being paid to the Civil List; how much did the Civil List receive during the life of the last Civil List?

  The Royal Household is provided with funding from a number of sources in order to support The Queen in undertaking Her Majesty's duties as Head of State. An analysis of the funding provided from public sources is set out on pages 40 and 41 of the Report of the Royal Trustees of 3 July 2000 (attachment C).

  Funding is provided to meet specific areas of expenditure. For example, funding is provided to maintain the Occupied Royal Palaces, which are important parts of the national heritage and buildings in which The Queen undertakes official duties as Head of State, to provide travel services for official purposes, and to pay for the central staff who support The Queen as Head of State.

  In order to minimise administration and related costs, cross-charges are not made between the funding sources. For example, when The Queen travels to an official engagement a cross-charge is not made from the Royal Travel Grant-in-aid to the Civil List. Similarly, charges are not made to the Civil List for office occupation costs (such as rates, gas, electricity and telephones) by the Property Services Grant-in-aid.

  The same principle applies in respect of accommodation provided to Civil List employees as part of their remuneration package and to facilitate the performance of their duties. For the reasons explained above, the Civil List does not pay the Property Services Grant-in-aid for this accommodation but receives the benefit of lower salaries itself. If it did pay for the accommodation, there would be no net effect for the taxpayer since the reduction in the Property Services Grant-in-aid would be offset by an increase in the Civil List. In fact, as a result of more administration, the cost to the taxpayer would be greater.

  This is a system that has worked well. As shown in attachment C, costs of the Monarchy have reduced by 43 per cent (in money terms) in the 10 years to 2000-01 (55 per cent in real terms).

  However, although there is no cross-charging, detailed accounts are published for each of the major funding sources; that is the Annual Reports for the Grants-in-aid and the Report of the Royal Trustees for the Civil List.

  The benefit to the Civil List from salary abatements and charges was set out on pages 16 and 17 of the July 2000 Report of the Royal Trustees, as shown below. The figures include abatements paid by live-in staff (ie by those who do not have self-contained residential accommodation). As noted in the Royal Trustees' Report, abatements for live-in staff are to recover costs incurred by the Civil List (eg in respect of food and cleaning) as well as by the Property Services Grant-in-aid.

Year
Housing abatements
and charges
£
1991
24,422
1992
32,455
1993
32,124
1994
186,604
1995
304,745
1996
389,612
1997
469,074
1998
522,744
1999
586,939
2000
622,914

12.   With reference to Para 1.4 of the C&AG's Report, how much was spent on:

    (a) furnishings;

    (b) decoration and

    for whose accommodation?

  In paragraph 1.4 of the C&AG's report there is reference to "furnishings and equipment" and to "furnishings, decorations and works at the discretion of the Sovereign". The former amounted to £518,000 in both 1998-99 and 1999-2000. Almost 80 per cent of the expenditure related to restoration and repair work by craftsmen on furniture in official areas of the Palaces. The remaining 20 per cent related to the purchase of office furniture and equipment for staff paid from the Grant-in-aid and of carpets and furnishings for the Chapels and Central Chancery Offices at St James's Palace, and to the restoration of historic carpets.

  With respect to the allowance for furnishings etc at the discretion of the Sovereign, ie the Separate Allocation, this has remained at £75,000 for several years. In 1998-99 and 1999-2000 it was spent on the following.

1998-99
£000
1999-2000
£000
White Drawing Room at Windsor Castle
51
19
Office furniture and equipment for staff not paid from the Grant-in-aid
22
20
Cupid tapestry at St James's Palace
0
29
Other costs
3
7
75
75

  No amount under either category was spent on furnishings or decorations for self-contained residential accommodation.

13.   Please provide a break-down of the use of the £630,000 shown at Note 1 of Para 1.5 of the C&AG's Report; on whose accommodation it was spent and the comparable expenditure in each of the last Civil List years? Give the gross amounts.

  Salary abatements and charges for employees and rental payments from other occupants of self-contained residential accommodation are analysed below.
1998-99
£'000
1999-2000
£'000
Salary abatements and charges for employees
521
519
Rent from pensioners and non-official employees
60
63
Commercial rents
132
209
less costs related to commercial rents
(83)
(578)
630
213

  It is the intention that, taking one year with another, income received by the Property Services Grant-in-aid and the Civil List in respect of self-contained residential accommodation should more than cover related costs. This was not the case in 1999-2000 as a result of substantial expenditure to prepare properties for commercial letting. Expenditure on self-contained residential accommodation of £620,000 in 1998-99 and of £722,000 in 1999-2000 is analysed below.

Project Occupant
1998-99
£'000
1999-2000
£'000
Buckingham Palace Mews
Partial redecoration flats 5, 9 and 14 Groom, Luggage Porter and Footman
13
0
Reoccupation service flats 1 and 2 Grooms
22
0
Reoccupation service flat 26 Senior Groom
18
0
Reoccupation service 16-17 Lower Grosvenor Place Single person accommodation—F branch
18
0
Reoccupation service flat 21 Single persons accommodation—F branch
0
29
Partial redecoration flat 47 Single persons accommodation—F branch
0
10
Kensington Palace
Reoccupation service Wren House HRH Duke of Kent
4
0
Partial redecoration apt 1A HRH Princess Margaret
4
0
Partial redecoration apt 1 HRH Duke of Gloucester
0
5
Reoccupation service No 2 Old Barracks Commercially let
24
23
Reoccupation service Kent Cottage HRH Duke of Kent
27
0
Reoccupation service No 4 Upper Lodge Sergeant Footman
9
0
Reoccupation service No 3 Upper Stables Senior Building Surveyor
2
0
Reoccupation services 7 Upper Lodge Porter
0
6
Reoccupation service 6 Old Barracks Commercially let
0
4
Reoccupation services feasibility study for apts 7 and 9 see below
4
0
Reoccupation service apts 7 and 11 Deputy Master and Equerry to HRH Duke of Edinburgh
0
167
Reoccupation service apt 9 Assistant Private Secretary
0
35
Reoccupation service Notingham Cottage Private Secretary to HRH Duke of Edinburgh
0
133
Power operator for Old Barracks Block yard gates Commercially let
0
6
St James's Palace
Reoccupation service apt 6 HRH Princess Royal
32
21
Reoccupation service apt 15 Private Secretary to HRH Prince of Wales
0
3
Reoccupation service apt 32 HRH Prince of Wales
32
0
Reoccupation service apt 30B Lord Chamberlain
32
2
Reoccupation service apt 31A Commercially let
51
24
Reoccupation service apts 24 and 27B Senior Pastry Cook and Equerry
26
0
Reoccupation service No 2 Marlborough Road Doorkeeper to State Apartments
31
15
Reoccupation service No 1 Marlborough Road Deputy Page of the Chambers
0
32
Marlborough House Mews
Reoccupation service No 2 Single persons accommodation—F branch
9
2
Reoccupation service No 9 Palace Attendant
28
0
Reoccupation service No 10 Cook
3
0
Reoccupation service No 3 Dresser
0
8
Reoccupation service No 4 Maintenance Officer
0
8
Hampton Court Mews
Reoccupation service flat 9 Commercially let
1
¸5
Reoccupation service flat 3 Pensioner
0
¸3
Windsor Castle
Reoccupation service Winchester Tower Property Manager
5
0
Reoccupation service No 10 Lower Ward Military Knight
17
0
Reoccupation service Garter House Superintendent of Windsor Castle
97
11
Reoccupation service No 5 Lower Ward Fire Precautions Officer
3
52
Reoccupation service Norman Tower Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle
0
5
Windsor Royal Mews
Reoccupation service flat 4 Burford House Pensioner
7
0
Reoccupation service flat 5 Burford House Assistant Groundsman
2
0
Reoccupation service flat 8 Burford House Pensioner
9
0
Reoccupation service No 2 St Albans Street Commercially let
7
¸7
Riding School flat and flat A Burford House Girl Grooms
9
0
Reoccupation service 7 and 10 Burford House Pensioner and Senior Dining Room Assistant
0
26
Windsor Home Park
Reoccupation service Windsor Hall flat 2 Deputy Yeoman, Plate Pantry
1
0
Reocc and external repairs No 2 New Albert Lodge Cabinet Maker
33
0
Reoccupation service No 4 Windsor Hall Building Services Technician
6
0
Minor repairs flat 6 Windsor Hall Vacant
0
4
Reoccupation service flat 1 Victoria House Furniture Restoration Supervisor
19
60
Reoccupation service No 1 Frogmore House Cottage Chauffeur to HRH Princess Alexandra
0
25
Reoccupation service 6 Frogmore Stables Cook
1
0
Reoccupation service flat 3 Windsor Hall Porter
6
12
Reoccupation service flat 5 Windsor Hall Electrician
8
6
Reoccupation service Town Gate Lodge Gate Keeper
0
3
620
722

  Where recoveries are shown they relate to either VAT or the transfer of costs to a more appropriate cost centre eg to transfer costs related to commercial lettings from housing to commercial rents.

  The space at St. James's Palace, referred to under project five, is still used as a picture conservation studio but on a less intensive basis and with fewer staff occupying it for fire, health and safety reasons. It has been replaced as the main picture restoration facility by the new studio in the Windsor Home Park.

  The reason for the fall in the income from salary abatements etc. from £630,000 to £213,000 is due to significant expenditure in 1999-2000 on preparing properties for commercial letting, as shown in the table given in 13 above. Commercial lettings expenditure was almost £0.5 million higher in 1999-2000, reflecting the refurbishment for letting of several properties and also the decision to charge all related building costs to this heading unless the work was already underway in 1998-99 (previously only the cost of enhancements was charged against commercial rents, with repairs and refurbishment expenditure which would have been incurred even if the property had not been let commercially charged to Property Maintenance).

  Accommodation available for commercial letting is all situated outside the security cordons unless let to the Ministry of Defence or other related organisations. All use is residential, except where noted below. Letting has generally been by professional agents. All the rent is received by the Property Services Grant-in-aid. Details of commercial lettings are set out below.

14.   Fig 13 of the C&AG's Report: What space was made available at St James's Palace?

  1. Why has net income from salary abatements, etc down from £630,000 in 1998-99 to £213,000 in 1999-2000?

16.   What accommodation has become available for commercial lettting? What was its previous use? What type of commercial activity will be permitted? How will the letting be handled and by whom? What rental income is it hoped to achieve? Please indicate whether the recipient will be the Civil List or the Department.

Property
Initial letting Date
Annual Rent
Previous Occupier (position)
St. James's Palace
31a St. James's Palace+
15/03/1999
12,173
Private Secretary to The Queen Mother
Ascot Office*
Not known
21,800
Not known
33,973
Kensington Palace
1 The Old Barracks,
01/01/2000
37,704
Chief Clerk & Accountant to The Duke of Edinburgh
2 The Old Barracks,
02/08/1999
37,704
Butler to the Princess of Wales
3 The Old Barracks,
Not yet let
n/a
Assistant Press Secretary
4 The Old Barracks,
15/03/1996
67,959
Deputy Press Secretary to The Queen
5 The Old Barracks,
22/10/2000
39,000
Private Secretary to The Duke of Edinburgh
6 The Old Barracks,
21/12/1999
98,800
Private Secretary to The Queen
Apartment 11
05/05/2000
7,575
Offices for the Princess of Wales
288,742
Hampton Court Mews
Laurel Cottage, Hampton Court Road 01/12/1995
15,600
Stud Hand
Rose Cottage, The King's Field, Hampton Court Road
06/03/1998
15,600
Widow of former stud employee
9 Hampton Court Mews
01/07/1997
12,000
Upholsterer
3 Hampton Court Mews
17/10/1999
8,000
Insignia Clerk, Central Chancery
4 Hampton Court Mews
Not yet let
n/a
Chef—F Branch
51,200
Windsor Castle
Windsor Horse Show Office*
Not known
3,750
Not known
2 St. Albans Street, Windsor
07/10/1999
11,700
Chauffeurs mess room
3 St. Albans Street, Windsor
05/07/1997
11,700
Horsebox Driver
3 St. Albans Close, Windsor
11/07/1997
17,400
Gilder
2 St. Albans Close, Windsor
Not yet let
n/a
Supervisor, Windsor Castle
44,550
Total
418,465

*Office, rather than residential, use.

+Let to the Ministry of Defence.

  The total of £418,465 is considerably more than the £209,000 given in the table in 13 above, because a number of the properties were let part way through or since 1999-2000.

Dr Devra Kay,

Committee Assistant

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Attachment B

ESTABLISHMENT

Staff paid from the Grant-in-aid operate in nine sub-sections as set out below.
As at 31 March1999 2000
Administration and Accounting
Director of Finance0.3 0.3
Financial Controller0.4 0.4
Utilities Manager1.0 1.0
Internal auditors1.3 1.3
Accounts clerks4.55.0
Telephone operators9.0 9.0
16.517.0
Property Maintenance Central Unit
Director1.01.0
Director of Finance0.2 0.2
Financial Controller0.4 0.5
Property Accountant1.0 1.0
Senior Quantity Surveyor1.0 1.0
Senior Building Surveyor0.0 1.0
3.64.7
Buckingham Palace Maintenance Office
Manager1.01.0
Building surveyors7.0 8.0
Planned Maintenance Technician1.0 1.0
Maintenance staff11.0 11.0
Gardeners12.012.0
32.033.0
St. James's and Kensington Palaces Maintenance Office
Manager1.01.0
Building surveyors3.5 4.0
Maintenance staff3.0 4.0
Clerical staff1.01.0
8.510.0
Windsor Castle and Hampton Court Mews and Paddocks Maintenance Office
Manager1.01.0
Building surveyors5.0 5.0
Maintenance staff9.0 9.0
Gardeners3.03.0
Clerical staff0.50.5
18.518.5
Fire, Health and Safety Services
Manager1.01.0
Central staff3.53.0
Buckingham Palace fire surveillance officers 10.010.0
Windsor Castle fire surveillance officers 10.010.0
24.524.0
Craftsmen
Supervisor1.01.0
Buckingham Palace3.0 3.0
Windsor Castle14.214.2
18.218.2
Porters and Non-domestic Cleaners
Supervisors2.02.0
Buckingham Palace18.0 18.0
Windsor Castle12.512.2
32.532.2
St. James's Palace State Apartments
Superintendent1.01.0
Doorman and cleaners3.5 3.5
Assistant1.01.0
5.55.5
159.8163.1

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