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Consultant

Dr. Murrison: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make a statement on the number of whole-time equivalent consultant vacancies in the NHS by specialty. [4421]

Mr. Hutton: Information is not available about the number of whole-time equivalent consultant vacancies. The Department collects information about vacant consultant posts, and information by speciality, taken from the 2001 vacancy survey, is provided in the table.

Department of Health vacancies survey, March 2001—vacancies in national health service trusts in England—consultants three month vacancy rates(26),(27) and numbers(28) for total of each group

Rates (percentage)Vacancies
Total consultants3.0670
Specific specialities
Accident and emergency7.940
Anaesthetics (inc. intensive care)1.760
General surgery1.720
Obstetrics and gynaecology1.520
Ophthalmology0.810
Oral and Maxillo Facial Surgery5.610
Otolaryngology2.910
Paediatric surgery5.710
Plastic surgery2.910
Trauma and orthopaedic surgery2.230
Urology2.710
Cardiology2.610
Cardiothoracic surgery1.60
Clinical oncology3.810
Clinical radiology4.670
Haematology2.110
Histopathology6.050
Medical oncology3.80
Palliative medicine7.410
Forensic psychiatry5.210
General psychiatry7.8130
Learning Disabilities13.330
Geriatric medicine3.020
Old Age Psychiatry9.330
Diabetes medicine2.710

(26) Three month vacancies are vacancies as at 31 March 2001 which trusts are actively trying to fill, which had lasted for three months or more (whole-time equivalents)

(27) Three month vacancy rates are three month vacancies expressed as a percentage of three month vacancies plus staff in post from the September 2000 medical and dental and non-medical work force censuses (whole-time equivalent)

(28) Numbers are rounded to the nearest ten

Notes:

1. Percentages rounded to one decimal place

2. England totals include staff from Special Health Authorities

3. Totals may not equal sum of component parts due to rounding

Source:

Department of Health Vacancies Survey 2001


19 Jul 2001 : Column: 436W

Mr. Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many consultants left the NHS in (a) England and (b) Buckingham in each year since 1980. [5644]

Mr. Hutton: The information requested is not available centrally.

Information about consultant vacancies in England and in Buckinghamshire health authority are shown in the table.

Department of Health Vacancies Survey, 1999–2001
Consultant vacancies in Buckinghamshire health authority(31)Three-month vacancy rates(29),(30) and numbers(32)

Number of three-month consultant vacanciesThree-month consultant vacancy rate (percentage)(33)
1999
England4702.3
Buckinghamshire HA102.6
2000
England6002.8
Buckinghamshire HA(32)00.8
2001
England6703.0
Buckinghamshire HA(32)00.4

(29) Three-month vacancies are vacancies as at 31 March 2001 which trusts are actively trying to fill, which had lasted for three months or more (whole time equivalents).

(30) Three-month vacancy rates are three-month vacancies expressed as a percentage of three-month vacancies plus staff in post from the September 2000 medical and dental and non-medical work force censuses (whole time equivalent).

(31) HA figures are based on Trusts, and do not necessarily reflect the geographical provision of health care.

(32) Numbers are rounded to the nearest 10.

(33) Percentages are calculated on unrounded figures and rounded to one decimal place.

Source:

Department of Health Vacancies Survey 2001


Hospital Travel Costs Scheme

Ms Walley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to extend the hospital travel costs scheme; and if he will make a statement. [4642]

Mr. Hutton: We have no immediate plans to extend the hospital travel costs scheme. However, the scheme is being kept under review.

National Service Framework

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will set out the terms of reference, work programme and schedule for the national service framework reviews. [4081]

19 Jul 2001 : Column: 437W

Mr. Hutton [holding answer 17 July 2001]: The Commission for Health Improvement (CHI), with the Audit Commission—and Social Services Inspectorate where appropriate—will review the implementation of each national service framework (NSF) at an appropriate time following their publication to allow for a period of early implementation prior to review.

NSFs which have already been published are: Mental Health NSF, September 1999; Coronary Heart Disease NSF, March 2000; and Older People NSF, March 2001.

The next NSF due to be published in 2001 is the Diabetes NSF. We have announced further NSFs on Renal Services, Children's Services, and Long Term Conditions.

CHI will publish details of the broad scope and timing of each review once this has been agreed.

CHI and the Audit Commission have already undertaken a review of the implementation of the Calman-Hine/Cameron reports on commissioning cancer services in England and Wales. The report is expected in the autumn.

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment his Department has made of the implications of the National Service Framework for Older People set out in paragraph 29, page 141 of the NSF; and what plans his Department has to analyse the impact of them. [4873]

Jacqui Smith: A general assessment of implications for wider areas of education and training was provided within the National Service Framework (NSF) for Older People. A more detailed assessment and analysis to ensure achievement of the NSF milestones will be undertaken nationally by the National Workforce Development Board, informed by the Care Group Workforce Team for older people to be established shortly, and working with education and training bodies. Regional directors of workforce development and local workforce development confederations working with local education and training organisations will play a local role.

Child Protection Register

Mr. Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many children in each London borough council are registered on the child protection register; and if he will make a statement. [4788]

Jacqui Smith: The latest figures available show the number of children on the child protection register of each London borough council as at 31 March 2000. These are as shown in the table.

Numbers of children on child protection registers at 31 March 2000, and rates per 10,000 of the population

Numbers of children on the CPR at 31 March 2000Rate per 10,000 population
London4,80929
Inner London
Camden17948
City of London112
Greenwich25547
Hackney26351
Hammersmith and Fulham15350
Islington22158
Kensington and Chelsea7022
Lambeth21234
Lewisham21737
Southwark16428
Tower Hamlets13025
Wandsworth14229
Westminster9826
Outer London
Barking and Dagenham11027
Barnet18124
Bexley13727
Brent11219
Bromley17227
Croydon29437
Ealing8412
Enfield10116
Haringey22644
Harrow14830
Havering10621
Hillingdon12922
Hounslow21443
Kingston-upon-Thames3712
Merton8721
Newham22331
Redbridge7313
Richmond-upon-Thames8322
Sutton10125
Waltham Forest8616

19 Jul 2001 : Column: 438W

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of children aged under 18 years registered during 1999–2000 on the child protection register had previously been registered. [5233]

Jacqui Smith: Of those children registered on a child protection register in England during the year ending 31 March 2000, 14 per cent. had previously been registered.

Health Care (Undergraduates)

Caroline Flint: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what his estimate is of the annual cost of providing to undergraduate students (a) free dental care, (b) free eye tests and (c) free prescriptions. [4911]

Mr. Hutton: The estimated costs of extending free treatment to undergraduate students in England are shown in the table:

Free treatmentApproximate figure £ million
Dental care12
Eye tests5
Prescriptions34


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