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Health Authority Allocations

Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will state in respect of (a) Buckinghamshire health authority, (b) Oxfordshire health authority and (c) Berkshire health authority, (i) their allocations from his Department for 2002–03 and (ii) the amount by which these allocations differ from their national level if they were funded in accordance with his Department's weighted-capitation funding formula. [26558]

Ms Blears [holding answer 21 January 2002]: The 2002–03 allocations and the amounts each health authority are under their targets determined by the weighted capitation formula are shown in the table.

£ million

Health authority2002–03 allocation2002–03 distances from targets
Buckinghamshire493.96-12.20
Oxfordshire445.46-8.88
Berkshire588.57-23.16

Pulmonary Disease

Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) if he will make it his policy to collect statistics for the number of patients in each health authority area with chronic pulmonary illnesses; [29356]

Jacqui Smith: Information on the incidence of individual conditions is not routinely collected centrally. We consider that it would not be cost effective to do this, due to the many conditions involved and the large

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investment in manpower and other resources that would be required to collect, maintain and update this type of statistical information.

In 1999, however, the Department commissioned the Wessex Institute for Health Research and Development to produce a report on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The report estimated that, in a typical health authority of 500,000 people, around 3,000 in the 45 plus age group would have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

No estimates have been made on the prevalence of disability although the Government do recognise that lung disease can be very debilitating.

Figures from the Office for National Statistics for causes of death show that, in 1999, around 150,000 people died from respiratory disease.

Health Care (Gloucestershire)

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the number of delayed discharges at hospitals in Gloucestershire; and if he will make a statement. [29303]

Ms Blears [holding answer 22 January 2002]: The Gloucestershire Health Community has been working closely with Gloucestershire county council social services and the independent sector in order to reduce the number of patients who although fit to be discharged from hospital are still occupying an acute bed. Since July local information shows the average number of patients waiting for discharge has declined from 109 to 47 on 20 January.

The national health service regional office and social care region are closely monitoring the action being taken in Gloucestershire to reduce delayed discharges.

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make a statement on the anticipated impact on Gloucestershire of the structural reforms proposed for the NHS. [29310]

Ms Blears [holding answer 22 January 2002]: The structural reforms proposed for the national health service will mean that as from April 2002, primary care trusts will be responsible for securing services, improving health and integrating health and social care in their areas. PCTs are local organisations led by clinicians and local people. They will work with partners from the local community to ensure that the local health service is responsive to local needs and best represents the needs of patients. By 2004, PCTs will receive 75 per cent. of the NHS budget to help them achieve their new agenda. All three PCTs in Gloucestershire will be located within the newly created Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire health authority, an organisation which will help to develop and performance manage the health service within its borders.

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of the availability of carers in Gloucestershire; and if he will make a statement. [29307]

Ms Blears [holding answer 22 January 2002]: Gloucestershire county council have the statutory duty to provide home care in that county.

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The most recent statistics on domiciliary staff numbers employed by Gloucestershire county council returned to the Department, for the year 2000, are as follows:

Number
Home/domiciliary care/help organizers58
Assistant and trainee home care/help organizers16
Home care staff/home helps561

Councils generally provide a significant proportion of their home care by contracting private and voluntary sector agencies. Central data on the level of this provision are not kept.

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment he has made of shortages of (a) doctors, (b) nurses and (c) scientific staff in the NHS in Gloucestershire; and if he will make a statement. [29306]

Ms Blears [holding answer 22 January 2002]: Information on the number of vacancies at national health service trusts within Gloucestershire health authority in March 2001 that had been unfilled for more than three months are given in the table.

Vacancies in NHS trusts in Gloucestershire HA, all staff groups,
three month vacancies(36) for total of each group

Number
Medical and dental staff0
Total consultants0
Other doctor and dentists (excluding training grades)0
Qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff50
Qualified Allied Health Professionals10

(36) Three month vacancies are vacancies as at 31 March 2001 which trusts are actively trying to fill, which had lasted for three months or more (whole-time equivalents).

Notes:

1. Numbers are rounded to the nearest 10.

2. Qualified Allied Health Professionals includes qualified staff from the following occupational groups: chiropody, dietetics, occupational therapy, orthoptics/optics, physiotherapy, diagnostic and therapeutic radiography.

Source:

Department of Health Vacancies Survey 2001


Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) nursing home and (b) residential care home places there were (i) in May 1997 and (ii) at the latest date for which figures are available, in Gloucestershire; and if he will make a statement. [29304]

Ms Blears [holding answer 22 January 2002]: The table shows the number of registered nursing beds in nursing homes, private hospitals and clinics and the number of places in residential care homes in Gloucestershire in 1997 and 2001.

Number of nursing beds and residential places(37) in Gloucestershire, 1997 and 2001—as at 31 March

Nursing care(37),(38)Residential careTotal care beds
19974,0473,7377,784
20013,0644,2417,305

(37) Excludes places in childrens' homes

(38) Registered beds in general and mental nursing homes, private hospitals and clinics.

(39) Information for registered nursing beds for 1997 relates to the period 1 October 1996 to 31 March 1997.

Source:

Department of Health Annual Statistical returns


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Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) nurses and (b) doctors were employed in the NHS in Gloucestershire (i) in May 1997 and (ii) at the latest date for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [29308]

Ms Blears [holding answer 22 January 2002]: The numbers of doctors and nurses employed in the national health service in Gloucestershire are shown in the table and show a 13.8 per cent. rise in the number of doctors and 2 per cent. rise in the number of nurses employed in the NHS in Gloucestershire between September 1997 and September 2000.

NHS Hospital and Community Health Services (HCHS): medical and dental staff(40), general medical practitioners(41) and nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff in Gloucestershire health authority each year as at 30 September
Headcount

19972000
Gloucestershire HA
All doctors870980
of which:
HCHS doctors500610
Practitioners (excluding GP retainers)360380
All nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff5,4205,530
of which:
Qualified3,3603,590
Unqualified1,8301,720
Practice nurses230220

(40) Figures exclude medical hospital practitioners and medical clinical assistants, most of whom are also GPs working part time in hospitals.

(41) All practitioners (excluding GP retainers) include UPEs, restricted principals, assistants, GP registrars, salaried doctors (para. 52 SFA) and PMS others. GP retainers were collected for the first time in 1999, in 2000 there were 1,117 in England, 224 in South West RO and 44 in Gloucestershire HA.

Notes:

1. Due to the new regional office boundaries in 1999 the 1997 figures are an estimated regional split.

2. Figures exclude learners and agency staff.

3. Due to rounding totals may not equal the sum of component parts.

4. Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Sources:

Department of Health Medical and Dental Workforce Census.

Department of Health General and Personal Medical Services Statistics.

Department of Health Non-Medical Workforce Census.



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