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16 Dec 2002 : Column 665W—continued

Anatomy Act

Mr. Gordon Prentice: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to review the application of the Anatomy Act 1984; and if he will make a statement. [86591]

Mr. Lammy: A comprehensive review of the law relating to human organs has been undertaken. Consultation has taken place through the report, XHuman Bodies, Human Choices", published in July 2002.

We expect to legislate when parliamentary time allows.

Autism (Good Practice Guidelines)

Dr. Ladyman: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what steps he is taking to monitor progress in implementing his Department's good practice guidelines in respect to autism. [84503]

Jacqui Smith: I refer my hon. Friend to the reply given by my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State (Mr. Ivan Lewis) at the Department for Education and Skills, on 9 December 2002, Official Report, column 96W.

Care Homes

Mr. Pickthall: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what statistics he collates on the (a) abuse and (b) neglect of residents in (i) private care homes, (ii) local authority care homes and (iii) NHS hospitals. [86507]

Jacqui Smith: Statistical data on the incidences of abuse or neglect of residents in care homes or inpatients in national health service hospitals is not collected centrally.

Local councils are required to keep clear and accurate records of complaints or allegations of abuse. They should be kept in such a way that they create statistical information as a by-product.

Child Protection

Mr. Wray: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the timetable is for the introduction of legislation to change the child protection system following the inquiry into the death of Victoria Climbie. [83217]

Jacqui Smith: We expect to receive Lord Laming's report into the circumstances that led to the death of Victoria Climbie later this year or early next year. The Government will consider the report's recommendations fully, before deciding what, if any, action, which might include legislation, needs to be taken as a result.

Drug Rehabilitation

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many drug rehabilitation centres treat addicts of (a) cocaine and (b) heroin. [86397]

Ms Blears: There are 715 drug treatment services in England that treat addicts of cocaine and heroin.

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Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost of drug rehabilitation was in each of the last five years; and how much was spent per person treated in (a) England, (b) the North East of England and (c) the constituency of Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland. [86398]

Ms Blears: This information is not available centrally.

There are 138 drug treatment residential rehabilitation services in England, providing over 3000 bedspaces within the drug and alcohol residential rehabilitation sector. The cost per week, per patient, varies from around 300 to around 1000 for a placement within a medical/clinical facility.

There is no information at present on community rehabilitation programmes, although work on unit costs is being developed by the National Treatment Agency.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of those receiving drug treatment are private patients. [86696]

Ms Blears: This information is not available centrally.

In England, during the year 2000–2001 the overall number of drug users reported as being in treatment was around 118,500.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people are undergoing drug treatment, broken down by drug action team area. [86691]

Ms Blears: Information on the numbers of drug misusers in contact with drug treatment agencies in England, broken down by drug action team area of treatment, is given in table 11 of the Statistical Bulletin, Statistics from the Regional Drug Misuse Databases on drug misusers in treatment in England, 2000–01—http://www.doh.gov.uk/public/sb0133.htm. This document is available in the Library.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what menu of treatments he requires to be available in each drug action team area. [86693]

Ms Blears: The overall menu of treatment services that residents of a drug action team (DAT) area should have access to, located either within the DAT area or located outside, is as follows:


John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many former drug addicts there are, broken down by (a) treatment method and (b) type of drug use. [86694]

Ms Blears: This information is not available centrally.

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Recent research evidence demonstrates that around half (47 per cent.) of drug users who have gone through residential programmes, and more than a third (35 per cent.) of those from methadone programmes are still abstinent from opiates at four to five years. More than a third (38 per cent.) of all the residential clients were also abstinent from all six illicit target drugs (illicit heroin, non-prescribed methadone, non-prescribed benzodiazepines, crack cocaine, powder cocaine, amphetamines) at four to five years.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what proportion of ex-drug addicts who have undergone treatment are drug free. [86699]

Ms Blears: Recent research evidence demonstrates that around half (47 per cent.) of drug users who have gone through residential programmes, and more than a third (35 per cent.) of those from methadone programmes are still abstinent from opiates at four to five years. More than a third (38 per cent.) of all the residential clients were also abstinent from all six illicit target drugs (illicit heroin, non-prescribed methadone, non-prescribed benzodiazepines, crack cocaine, powder cocaine, amphetamines) at four to five years.

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many former drug addicts have remained drug free for (a) over one year and (b) over five years following treatment. [86700]

Ms Blears: Recent research evidence noted that:

The percentage of residential clients who were abstinent from illicit opiates (heroin and illicit methadone) was around 50 per cent. at one year. Abstinence rates from stimulants (all forms of cocaine and amphetamines) was around 68 per cent. at one year. Abstinence from crack cocaine was around 82 per cent. The percentage of clients treated in community methadone treatments who were abstinent from illicit opiates at one year was around 22 per cent. Abstinence rates from stimulants (all forms of cocaine and amphetamines) was around 64 per cent. at one year. Abstinence from crack cocaine was around 79 per cent.

These reductions in illicit drug use were generally maintained throughout the four to five year follow-up period. Almost half (47 per cent.) of the residential, and more than a third (35 per cent.) of those from the methadone programmes were still abstinent from opiates at four to five years. More than a third (38 per cent.) of all the residential clients were abstinent from all six illicit target drugs (illicit heroin, non-prescribed methadone, non-prescribed benzodiazepines, crack cocaine, powder cocaine, amphetamines) at four to five years.

Harefield Hospital

Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans he has to improve cardiac surgery facilities at Harefield Hospital and when they will be operational. [86433]

Mr. Hutton: The Royal Brompton and Harefield National Health Service Trust has planned the replacement of a catheter laboratory and two cardiac

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operating theatres at Harefield Hospital. The former will be in operation by July 2003 and the latter by May 2003.

Heroin

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many deaths from heroin overdoses there were in (a) 2001 and (b) 2002. [82268]

Ruth Kelly: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician. I have asked him to reply.

Letter from Len Cook to Mr. Mann dated 16 December 2002:















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