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16 Jan 2003 : Column 795W—continued

Nuclear Accident

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what her Department's role is in the event of a nuclear accident. [90230]

Mr. Wilson: DTI would be the lead Government Department in the event of an emergency at a civil nuclear site in England or Wales and would be responsible for co-ordinating the response to the emergency at the national level. In Scotland, this responsibility would fall to the Scottish Executive.

As lead Department, DTI would set up its Nuclear Emergency Briefing Room in London to liaise closely with all relevant local and national agencies and departments, and co-ordinate necessary action at national level; be the main source of information from central Government to the public and media; alert the UK's international partners; brief Ministers on the emergency; and appoint a Government Technical Adviser (GTA) from HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate to advise the police and emergency services on measures to protect the public. DTI would work closely with the Scottish Executive which has parallel arrangements for an emergency in Scotland. DTI

16 Jan 2003 : Column 796W

Ministers would report to the Houses of Parliament in respect of an emergency at any civil nuclear site in the UK.

DTI participates in the regular programme of off-site nuclear exercises held for all nuclear sites to help maintain constant readiness and, through the lessons of those exercises, seek improvements.

Nuclear Installations (Consequence Management)

Llew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if she will make a statement on the major programme of activities to reduce vulnerabilities and strengthen the arrangements for consequence management at nuclear installations. [90315]

Mr. Wilson: The Department is working with the Health and Safety Executive's Nuclear Installations Inspectorate and the civil nuclear industry to both identify and reduce vulnerabilities and strengthen arrangements for consequence management. It is not Government policy to discuss details of security arrangements at civil nuclear sites.

Oil Reserves

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what has been the annual global (a) production and (b) consumption of oil each year since 1997. [90786]

Mr. Wilson: Estimates of global production of crude oil and natural gas liquids together with estimates for global oil demand are produced by the International Energy Agency and are given in the following table.

Million metric tonnes

YearWorld production of crude oil and natural gas liquidsWorld oil demand
19973,4643,393
19983,5323,419
19993,4563,474
20003,5853,516
20013,5793,519

Source:

International Energy Agency (Oil Information 2002)


Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what has been the average (a) gross and (b) net price received per barrel of oil extracted from the UK section of the North Sea in each year since 1974; and what the average price of oil per barrel was on the world market in each of those years. [90792]

Mr. Wilson: The DTI surveys which collect data giving the average price received per barrel of oil extracted from the UK were begun only in 1976. The prices from these surveys have been converted to $/barrel and are shown in the table against the spot prices of the three major world benchmark crudes. The prices shown are gross; prices net of costs and taxes/royalties cannot be estimated because data restricted to oil production are unavailable.

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Crude Oil Prices 1976–2001

Spot marker prices
Average UK price received BrentDubaiWest Texas intermediateExchange rate
#/tonne$/bbl 1 $/barrel 2 $/barrel 3 $/barrel 4 $/#
197655.013.212.811.612.21.80
197759.413.813.912.414.21.75
197853.213.614.013.014.61.92
197973.720.931.629.825.12.12
1980111.934.736.835.738.02.33
1981138.337.335.934.336.12.03
1982142.033.133.031.833.71.75
1983148.330.029.628.830.31.52
1984164.929.428.728.129.41.34
1985158.327.427.527.528.01.30
198673.314.314.413.015.01.47
198781.717.918.416.919.21.64
198863.415.015.013.216.01.78
198981.017.718.215.719.71.64
199094.622.523.820.524.51.79
199186.020.320.016.621.51.77
199283.419.619.417.220.61.77
199385.817.217.114.918.41.50
199477.015.716.014.817.21.53
199581.117.117.216.118.41.58
199696.920.220.818.622.21.56
199787.419.119.318.120.61.64
199860.013.313.112.214.41.66
199980.017.318.317.319.31.62
2000138.027.929.026.230.41.52
2001125.624.124.822.825.91.44

Notes:

1. Assuming 1 tonne = 7.5 barrels

2. 1976–1984 Forties, 1985–2001 Brent

3. 1972–1985 Arabian Light, 1986–2001 Dubai

4. 1976–1983 Posted WTI prices, 1984–2001 Spot WTI prices

Sources:

UK price received: DTI PQ1100 Quarterly Enquiry and preceding surveys.

Spot marker prices: BP Statistical Review of World Energy (2002).

Exchange rate: ONS.


Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what estimate she has made of (a) the quantity of oil in the world that remains unextracted and (b) how long this will last at present rates of extraction. [90787]

Mr. Wilson: The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimates that proven global reserves of conventional crude oil and natural gas liquids are 959 billion barrels. In addition, the IEA estimates undiscovered resources of conventional crude oil and natural gas liquids to be 939 billion barrels and recoverable non-conventional reserves, such as oil shales, to be 580 billion barrels. In their 2002 publication World Energy Outlook, the IEA commented that resources of conventional crude oil and natural gas liquids are adequate to meet the projected increase in demand to 2030, although new discoveries will be needed to renew reserves.

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how much oil has been extracted from the UK section of the North Sea in each year since 1974; and what the estimated total left unextracted is. [90789]

Mr. Wilson: Information on offshore UK production of crude oil and natural gas liquids is provided in the table.

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YearMillion tonnes
19740.3
19751.5
197612.1
197738.2
197853.9
197977.6
198080.2
198189.2
1982103.0
1983114.6
1984125.7
1985127.2
1986126.6
1987122.8
1988113.7
198991.0
199089.8
199187.6
199290.3
199396.5
1994121.9
1995124.8
1996124.5
1997123.3
1998127.3
1999132.8
2000123.0
2001113.8

As at the end of 2001, oil reserves on the United Kingdom Continental Shelf (including onshore and outside the North Sea) were estimated to range between 605 and 1,430 million tonnes for remaining reserves in existing discoveries and between 205 and 1,930 million tonnes in potential future discoveries.


16 Jan 2003 : Column 799W

Nuclear Power

Mr. Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many of the nuclear power stations proposed to be built under the new nuclear programme will be built in Scotland. [90760]

Mr. Wilson [holding answer 14 January 2003]: There is no such programme. Development consent for any new nuclear power station in Scotland would be a matter for Scottish Ministers, if such a proposal should arise.

REPPIR

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how much each local council is expected to spend on implementing REPPIR; how much each local council has spent on formulating their latest REPPIR plan; how much each local council has spent on acquiring the necessary equipment; and what stocks of equipment each REPPIR council has. [90231]

Mr. Wilson: Information about the expenditure local authorities have incurred in complying with the Radiation (Emergency Preparedness and Public Information) Regulations 2001 (REPPIR) is not collected by the Health and Safety Executive who enforce the Regulations and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

To date, off-site plans under REPPIR have been identified as necessary for all sites licensed under the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 and certain Ministry of Defence sites. REPPIR allows local authorities to charge site operators for their costs in preparing, reviewing, revising and testing off-site plans and has formalised local arrangements that existed for many nuclear sites prior to the Regulations coming into force. I would not expect the additional costs to local authorities of complying with REPPIR to be significant.


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