10 Mar 2003 : Column 1WS

Written Ministerial Statements

Monday 10 March 2003

HOME DEPARTMENT

Prison Service Annual Report and Accounts 2001–02 (Erratum)

The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department (Hilary Benn): Due to an error, the expenditure figures reported in appendix 2 of the Prison Service annual report and accounts for 2001–02 (HC 957) are incorrect.

Amended expenditure, cost per place and cost per prisoner figures are given in the table.

Expenditure 2001–02 £ Cost PerPlace £ Cost Per Prisoner £
Acklington 12,306,951 15,738 16,459
Albany 9,638,824 21,612 21,853
Altcourse 30,595,345 49,695 37,029
Ashfield 12,542,677 30,817 33,314
Ashwell 7,977,359 16,465 20,204
Askham Grange 2,802,068 21,029 22,431
Aylesbury 10,900,371 26,077 31,466
Bedford 8,449,674 23,819 20,414
Belmarsh 30,948,620 38,702 36,608
Birmingham 16,696,491 23,173 19,839
Blakenhurst 9,672,424 14,950 11,540
Blantyre House 2,490,332 20,753 21,315
Blundeston 9,982,610 24,568 24,074
Brinsford 12,069,795 25,304 26,767
Bristol 17,134,205 35,063 29,872
Brixton 19,503,711 29,960 25,756
Brockhill 5,643,993 34,000 36,729
Buckley Hall 6,696,946 19,134 20,469
Bullingdon 15,178,114 19,648 17,073
Bullwood Hall 5,623,916 31,244 33,693
Camp Hill 10,096,506 20,991 19,231
Canterbury 6,268,130 31,657 21,955
Cardiff 13,370,996 25,521 20,800
Castington 11,168,010 24,278 37,740
Channings Wood 11,238,889 18,921 19,108
Chelmsford 11,573,580 25,834 24,770
Coldingley 7,909,234 21,338 21,754
Cookham Wood 3,576,878 29,807 24,264
Dartmoor 14,631,698 21,438 24,369
Deerbolt 9,711,053 20,487 23,968
Doncaster 18,369,239 23,825 17,028
Dorchester 5,726,272 33,292 23,785
Dover 6,728,429 21,292 33,600
Downview 7,158,940 25,334 35,572
Drake Hall 5,694,213 18,309 24,784
Durham 22,550,479 35,290 32,303
East Sutton Park 2,198,632 23,390 23,705
Eastwood Park 7,352,500 24,924 23,403
Elmley 15,151,353 19,858 16,523
Erlestoke 6,191,130 18,991 19,398
Everthorpe 7,959,428 18,172 18,446
Exeter 10,282,669 32,033 21,467
Featherstone 12,549,693 20,951 21,337
Feltham 24,346,837 28,915 37,471
Ford 6,271,678 12,518 15,260
Forest Bank 19,522,324 24,403 23,243
Foston Hall 5,299,241 25,611 27,422
Frankland 24,550,210 37,596 38,480
Full Sutton 23,541,026 39,040 39,827
Garth 12,879,054 20,346 21,016
Gartree 8,886,522 24,280 31,522
Glen Parva 16,615,880 25,024 21,642
Gloucester 7,417,888 31,432 25,869
Grendon 11,293,398 22,177 25,345
Guys Marsh 8,103,303 16,639 15,928
Haslar 2,847,598 17,797 19,526
Hatfield 4,116,132 22,867 24,428
Haverigg 9,638,719 17,398 17,955
Hewell Grange 3,018,642 15,681 18,022
High Down 17,266,744 26,605 24,374
Highpoint 16,860,131 19,159 20,056
Hindley 13,429,476 24,935 30,032
Hollesley Bay 12,625,347 27,269 37,678
Holloway 20,210,798 39,668 41,622
Holme House 16,789,328 18,524 17,891
Hull 13,824,391 23,425 24,056
Huntercombe 9,984,812 27,736 30,628
Kingston 4,748,471 24,603 26,102
Kirkham 10,642,725 18,445 22,226
Kirklevington 2,806,220 15,335 16,355
Lancaster 5,718,902 23,829 25,268
Lancaster Farms 11,715,333 23,620 23,478
Latchmere House 3,052,466 15,748 17,842
Leeds 23,291,510 30,015 18,876
Leicester 8,204,348 37,837 23,989
Lewes 9,985,425 20,589 21,672
Leyhill 8,585,073 20,939 22,592
Lincoln 11,655,841 25,561 22,666
Lindholme 15,386,512 23,635 24,941
Littlehey 10,376,197 16,629 16,653
Liverpool 25,565,332 21,163 18,957
Long Lartin 20,122,537 33,594 47,431
Low Newton 7,547,572 30,393 27,454
Lowdham Grange 12,694,649 25,188 25,667
Maidstone 10,405,357 18,625 27,607
Manchester 26,037,371 27,350 22,245
Moorland 15,006,469 20,279 19,625
Morton Hall 4,821,307 25,111 27,265
Mount 11,565,509 16,405 15,896
New Hall 10,405,367 31,821 28,731
North Sea Camp 3,738,139 16,763 19,369
Northallerton 5,080,145 33,385 26,164
Norwich 14,164,851 25,534 19,509
Nottingham 10,413,672 23,757 20,786
Onley 13,504,211 21,100 24,617
Parc 28,811,957 35,266 32,237
Parkhurst 12,434,863 25,798 28,450
Pentonville 22,239,323 24,793 19,136
Portland 11,313,801 22,097 23,949
Preston 13,192,099 30,614 23,816
Ranby 12,851,506 18,012 17,623
Reading 6,761,178 34,019 28,700
Risley 16,393,281 19,899 20,462
Rochester 8,790,555 20,864 35,686
Rye Hill 14,567,327 24,279 24,635
Send 4,609,307 20,951 21,315
Shepton Mallet 4,833,094 25,304 29,470
Shrewsbury 6,518,034 35,264 19,762
Stafford 10,624,651 16,945 17,201
Standford Hill 7,308,028 19,031 21,106
Stocken 9,454,466 17,004 16,493
Stoke Heath 13,554,911 22,445 25,959
Styal 10,894,273 26,442 25,375
Sudbury 7,606,310 14,712 15,213
Swaleside 13,493,143 17,953 17,933
Swansea 7,511,933 30,787 28,920
Swinfen Hall 7,445,594 23,322 23,883
Thorn Cross 7,359,861 23,291 33,671
Usk 6,805,526 27,132 21,016
Verne 9,534,353 17,272 16,823
Wakefield 19,914,099 26,695 35,688
Wandsworth 25,450,136 22,070 18,735
Wayland 9,928,885 16,014 15,821
Wealstun 10,870,434 17,200 17,990
Weare 7,340,016 18,350 19,478
Wellingborough 9,133,034 17,631 18,163
Werrington 5,058,625 38,962 41,778
Wetherby 8,594,400 23,873 26,438
Whatton 4,877,528 17,736 18,048
Whitemoor 22,611,769 44,687 56,837
Winchester 11,907,739 27,125 20,498
Wolds 8,642,518 24,007 21,665
Woodhill 22,103,665 32,649 32,807
Wormwood Scrubs 23,256,552 19,424 22,778
Wymott 14,929,816 18,455 18,897

An erratum to the Prison Service annual report and accounts2001–02 will be placed in the Library.


10 Mar 2003 : Column 3WS

Human Trafficking

The Minister for Citizenship and Immigration (Beverley Hughes): I am pleased to announce new measures to support female victims of human trafficking for sexual exploitation in the UK.

The Nationality, Immigration and Asylum (NIA) Act 2002, introduced a new offence that commenced on 10 February 2003 of "trafficking a person for the purpose of controlling him or her in prostitution."

From today, safe accommodation and a range of services will be provided to support female victims of human trafficking through a non-governmental organisation. A six-month pilot scheme located in London will cater for approximately 25 women, on a rolling basis, who meet the criteria for access to the services, including a willingness to come forward and co-operate with the authorities in the combating of international organised crime that could lead to prosecutions of criminals.

We will consider, in light of individual circumstances, whether it would be appropriate to allow such victims who have co-operated to remain here. Where they are to return home, we will assist them to do so, providing them with initial counselling, ensuring that they have suitable accommodation to return to, and providing help to enable them to re-integrate into their own community and find employment.

We are also publishing a new "best practice toolkit" for the police, immigration officers and others who deal with illegal immigrants and trafficking victims. The toolkit will help them to identify victims and to provide practical advice on how to deal with them appropriately.

The Sexual Offences Bill, introduced into the House of Lords on 28 January 2003 also proposes new comprehensive offences of trafficking for sexual exploitation to replace the stop-gap offence introduced by the NIA Act 2002 of Trafficking in Prostitution. These new offences tackle the movement of people into, within and out of the UK for the purposes of sexual exploitation, and will carry maximum penalties of 14 years imprisonment. The offence relating to trafficking within the UK applies equally to UK nationals trafficked from place to place in the UK, and to foreign nationals brought here and then moved around from place to place within the UK. This is the first time that the trafficking of UK nationals within the UK has been tackled in legislation.

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Internationally, we are committed to addressing the issue of trafficking by our involvement with the EU Framework Decision on combating the trafficking of human beings, and the UN protocol to prevent, suppress and punish trafficking. I believe the trafficking provisions in this Bill meet the requirements of the EU decision, and the UN Protocol and indeed go further in that they criminalise trafficking for a sexual offence per se, whereas the protocol specifies it ought to be criminal only in certain circumstances, for example, where forcer, coercion or abduction are involved.

They also go further than the provisions in the NIA Act in specifying that it will be a criminal offence to traffic someone for the purposes of submitting them to a sex offence, rather than limiting this to trafficking them for the purposes of exploiting their prostitution. This allows us to offer greater protection against all forms of sexual trafficking, for example, for those who are trafficked in order to be sexually assaulted by others where there is no prostitution taking place.

In addition the Bill introduces new offences to tackle directly the commercial sexual exploitation of children. The activities that the offences cover include buying the sexual services of a child, causing or encouraging a child into commercial sexual exploitation, facilitating the commercial sexual exploitation of a child, and controlling the activities of a child involved in prostitution. The maximum penalties available for these offences will range from seven years to life imprisonment depending upon the nature of the offence committed and the age of the child victim.

All these provisions together, will set in place a comprehensive framework of robust legislation and improved support that will enable us both to bear down on perpetrators, often organised criminals, and provide a better response to victims.


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