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Drug Treatment

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what drug treatment facilities are available for juveniles in (a) local authority secure units, (b) secure training centres and (c) young offender institutions; and who provides them. [102449]

Hilary Benn: The Youth Justice Board for England and Wales (YJB) is responsible for commissioning and purchasing juvenile secure accommodation from the prison Service, private sector secure training centres (STCs) and local authority secure units LASUs), and for setting and monitoring standards.

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The YJB requires custodial establishments to provide access to substance misuse assessments, care plan development, withdrawal services and education/awareness programmes.

Prison Service Drugs Strategy Directorate is responsible for drugs services in young offender institutions (YOIs). The Prison Service model for delivering druges services is CARATs (Counselling, Assessment, Referral, Advice and Throughcare services). CARATs services can be provided by both prison service staff and external agencies. All young peole should be screened by health staff as part of their general induction assessment. CARATs staff support this process and may provide specialist intervention as appropriate.

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STCs and LASUs generally provide in-house substance misuse services managed by each unit's health provision and education services. Some LASUs also commission additional specialist services from the community. Young people are screened on arrival to the units, and prevention education takes place as pat of personal social health education.

Recognising that there is inconsistent provision across the secure estate, the YJB has commissioned Galahad consultants to identify the substance misuse needs of young people in custody, the level of current service provision and gaps. Their final report will be available in June 2003 and will inform future work in this area. The YJB has also commissioned Drugscope to develop effective practice guidance for youth justice staff on working with young people with substance misuse needs; this will be available in June 2003.

The national drug strategy relaunched by the Home Office in December 2002 identifies as a priority vulnerable young people and those within the youth justice system. The YJB has been allocated £300 million over three years from 2003 to improve substance misuse services across the juvenile secure estate.

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what form of drug treatment is available for prisoners (a) on remand and (b) serving sentences of less than two years. [102465]

Hilary Benn: The Prison Service has in place a range of drug interventions to address the needs of low, moderate and severe drug-misusing prisoners who are either on remand or serving sentences of less than two years. Detoxification is available in all local and remand prisons; Counselling, Assessment, Referral, Advice and Throughcare (CARAT) services are available in all prisons—as is access to the voluntary drug testing programme.

The Service recognises that many prisoners who serve two years or less are likely—due to their sentence length—to be excluded from participation in drug rehabilitation programmes. The Service has, as part of the recent Spending Review 2002 settlement, received significant funding to boost treatment provision. Part of this funding will be channelled into developing a low-intensity programme specifically targeted at those prisoners who will only be in custody for a short period.

Simon Hughes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to his answer to the hon. Member for Huntingdon (Mr. Djanogly) of 5 March 2003, Official Report, column 772W, what forms of (a) drug detoxification and (b) other types of rehabilitation programme are available for prisoners serving sentences of less than two years; and if he will make a statement. [102468]

Hilary Benn: Drug detoxification is available in all local and remand prisons. Detoxification can be made available to reduce the effects of withdrawal symptoms from specific drugs or to provide maintenance prescribing. The Counselling, Assessment, Referral,

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Advice and Throughcare (CARAT) service is available in all prisons as is access to the voluntary drug programme.

Prisoners who serve two years or less are likely, due to sentence length, to be unable to participate in a drug rehabilitation programme. The Prison Service received funding from the recent Spending Review 2002 to boost treatment provision. Part of this funding will be used to develop a programme specifically targeted at those prisoners who will be in custody for a short period.

Drug Use (Wales)

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the level of (a) class A drug and (b) illegal drug use in Wales. [102537]

Mr. Bob Ainsworth: The 2001–02 British Crime Survey estimates that two per cent. of adults aged 16 to 59-years-olds in Wales have taken a Class A drug in the last year. The equivalent estimate for England is three per cent. The difference between the two estimates is statistically significant.

The 2001–02 British Crime Survey estimates that eight per cent. of adults aged 16 to 59-years-olds in Wales have taken an illicit drug in the last year. The equivalent estimate for England is 12 per cent. Again, the difference between the two estimates is statistically significant.

Inmate Information Service

Mrs. Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department [pursuant to his answer of 3 February 2003, Official Report, column 78W], on the Inmate Information System, which prisons are (a) linked and (b) not linked on the Inmate Information System; how many prisoners' records are (i) linked and (ii) not linked on the Inmate Information System; and if he will make a statement. [101929]

Hilary Benn: All prisons are linked to the Inmate Information system (IIS). All historical information is retained on IIS and is accessible from all prisons. There is currently no automatic method of linking prisoners' records, but this will be a component of a replacement system that is now being considered.

Currently, manual linking of previous custody information is required as there is no reliable unique identifier (a new prison number is allocated at the beginning of each period of custody) and the National Insurance number is not always available. Inevitably, this means that details of previous custody may not always be available. This limitation in the current IIS system will be addressed in the replacement system now being considered.

Landmine Act 1998

Dr. Jenny Tonge: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prosecutions there have been under the Landmine Act 1998; and how many have been successful. [102245]

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Hilary Benn: Persons proceeded against and those found guilty of summary offences under the Landmines Act 1998 cannot be separately identified on the Home Office Court proceedings database. There have been no cases of persons proceeded against for indictable or triable either way offences under the Act reported to the Home Office.

Manslaughter

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the regulatory impact assessment on the issue of corporate manslaughter which commenced in September 2002 was completed by the end of 2002; when he expects to put proposals before the House for an offence of corporate manslaughter; and if he will make a statement. [103287]

Hilary Benn: Contributions to the Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) were requested by the end of the year. We have since been analysing the responses and actively encouraging those organisations which had not replied, in order to produce an RIA. The Government remains committed to legislating on corporate manslaughter and will do so as soon as parliamentary time allows.

Mr. Andrew Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to his answer of 12 March 2003, Official Report, column 975W, on manslaughter, when he expects to publish the digest of responses to the consultation paper; and if he will make a statement. [103453]

Hilary Benn: We will be preparing a summary of responses to the consultation, and will make this available as soon as possible. Following completion of the consultation, we are at present conducting a regulatory impact assessment on the proposals.

Metropolitan Police

Mr. Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the crime detection rate has been within the Metropolitan Police force area during each of the last five years; [100600]

Mr. Denham: Overall detection rates and numbers of robbery offences recorded for the Metropolitan Police are given in the table.

Robery offences recorded
1997(20)27,386
1998–99(21)26,330
1999–2000(22)36,317
2000–01(23)40,992
2001–02(23)53,547

Detection rate percentage for total recorded crime
1997(20)26
1998–99(21)22
1999–2000(22)16
2000–01(23)15
2001–02(23)14

(20) Recorded on a calendar year basis up to 1997, and thereafter on a financial year basis (12 months to March).

(21) The number of crimes recorded in that financial year using the expanded offence coverage and revised counting rules which came into effect on 1 April 1998. This will also have affected the detection rate.

(22) The counting rules for detections changed on 1 April 1999.

(23) Figures recorded on the new boundary basis, whereby the Metropolitan Police ceded parts of its boundary to three surrounding police forces, Essex. Hertfordshire and Surrey, on 1 April 2000.

There was a change in counting rules for recorded crime on 1 April 1998, which would have the tendency to increase the number of offences counted. Numbers of offences before and after this date are therefore no directly comparable.

There was also a change in counting rules for detections on 1 April 1999. The new instructions provide more precise and rigorous criteria for recording a detection, with the underlying emphasis on the successful result of a police investigation. Numbers of detections before and after this date are therefore not directly comparable.


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