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3 Apr 2003 : Column 817W—continued

Classroom Sizes

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what average classroom sizes

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were in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the north east and (d) England in each year since 1997. [105853]

Mr. Miliband: The information requested is shown in the table.

Maintained primary and secondary schools(4): average size of one teacher classes(5)
Position in January each year.

Jarrow South Tyneside North East England
PrimarySecondaryPrimarySecondaryPrimarySecondaryPrimarySecondary
199726.422.727.022.727.222.027.521.7
199826.222.026.922.527.322.227.721.7
199925.922.426.222.826.722.327.521.9
200025.422.125.822.726.222.127.122.0
200125.521.725.822.425.822.126.722.0
200224.821.825.222.025.321.826.321.9

(4) Includes middle schools as deemed.

(5) Classes as taught during the one selected period in each school on the day of the census in January.

Source:

Annual Schools Census


Graduate Tax

Paul Farrelly: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) when he will publish details of the principal alternative models of university and student funding which his Department has considered; [104662]

Mr. Charles Clarke [holding answer 31 March 2003]: I will write to the hon. Member shortly and will place a copy of the letter in the House of Commons Library.

Materials Science

Mr. Sheerman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will introduce an AS/A level course in materials science. [105774]

Mr. Miliband: There are currently no plans to introduce an AS/A level course in materials science.

Parenting Orders

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many parenting orders have been sought by and granted to schools in the Buckingham constituency since July 2001. [106369]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The information requested is not collected centrally. However, Buckinghamshire local education authority advises that local magistrates have granted parenting orders in nine of the cases it has brought to prosecution since July 2001.

Pupil Exclusions

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many decisions taken by schools in the Buckingham constituency permanently to exclude pupils were reversed by independent appeal panels in (a) 2000–01 and (b) 2001–02. [106010]

Mr. Miliband: Information on exclusion appeals is collected at local education authority (LEA) level. The available information for Buckinghamshire LEA is shown in the table. Figures for the academic year 2001–02 will be available in May 2002.

Summary of school exclusion appeals in academic years 1999–2000 and 2000–01: Buckinghamshire LEA

Exclusions appeals by parents
LodgedHeardDecided in Parents'Favour
NumberNumber Percentage(6)Number Percentage(7)
Primary, Secondary and Special Schools
1999–200010880.0450.0
2000–01161381.3646.2

(6) Shown as a percentage of appeals lodged.

(7) Shown as a percentage of appeals heard.

Source:

School Exclusion Appeals Survey


Pupil Setting

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what the guidelines are to local education authorities with regard to the in-school setting of pupils by ability at secondary level; [105402]

Mr. Miliband: Setting by pupil ability is not mandatory in any subject in secondary schools. We have not issued general guidelines to local education authorities over approaches to in-school setting of

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pupils, although we have encouraged setting as part of a range of measures which schools can adopt to meet the learning needs of their more able pupils.

We do not collect data on setting in secondary schools. Within about 87 per cent. of the secondary schools inspected by Ofsted during 2001/02 at least one setted/banded lesson was inspected.

Ofsted also found that the level of setting increases throughout Key Stage 3, from 26 per cent. of lessons inspected in Year 7, to 38 per cent. in Year 8, rising to 44 per cent. in Year 9, with setting much more common in subjects such as mathematics, science, modern foreign languages and English.

SATs

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what change there has been in SAT results of primary schools students over the last five years. [106512]

Mr. Miliband: The National Literacy and Numeracy Strategies have brought about significant improvements in primary school test results over the last five years. The tables below show the percentage of seven and 11 year olds achieving the expected level in the Key Stage 1 and 2 tests.

Key Stage 1 test results (percentage of children achieving level 2 or above)

19981999200020012002(8)
English(9)
Reading8082838484
Writing8183848686
Spelling6671727578
Mathematics8487909190

(8) Provisional

(9) There is no overall English result at Key Stage 1.


Key Stage 2 test results (percentage of children achieving level 4 and above)

19981999200020012002(10)
English6571757575
Mathematics5969727173
Science6978858786

(10) Provisional


Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what proportion of school pupils achieved level 4 at Key Stage 2 in (a) English and (b) maths in (i) England and (ii) schools in the Buckingham constituency in 2002. [106766]

Mr. Miliband: The percentage of pupils achieving Level 4 or above in the 2002 Key Stage 2 tests in (i) England and (ii) schools in the Buckingham constituency:

Percentage
English
Buckingham83
England75
Mathematics
Buckingham80
England73


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School Absences

Sue Doughty: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many unauthorised absences there were in each school in each year since 1998, broken down by parliamentary constituency. [104595]

Mr. Ivan Lewis [holding answer 24 March 2003]: I will write to the hon. Member with the information when it is available, and a copy of my letter will be placed in the Library.

School Exclusions

Mr. Fabian Hamilton: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will reverse the policy on exclusion in secondary schools. [105539]

Mr. Ivan Lewis [holding answer 31 March 2003]: As a result of the SEN and Disability Act 2001, children who have statements of special educational needs (SEN), have a stronger right to mainstream education where this is what their parents want, and where it is compatible with the efficient education of other children. The Act also amended the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 to provide protection from discrimination for disabled pupils and prospective pupils, and introduced duties on LEAs and schools to plan strategically to increase access to schools for disabled pupils.

There are strong educational, as well as social and moral, grounds for educating children with SEN or disabilities with their peers, and we believe that with the right strategies and support, the vast majority of children with special educational needs or disabilities can be included in a mainstream school. An increasing number of schools are showing that an inclusive approach can reinforce a commitment to higher standards of achievement for all children. This approach applies equally to early years settings, primary, and secondary schools. However, we also see a continuing and vital role for special schools, and are currently consulting on the proposals of the Special Schools Working Group, who have made recommendations on how special schools could work with mainstream schools to further develop their role within the Government's inclusion framework.


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