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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

India

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment his Department has made of poverty levels within the Indian state of Jharkhand. [152411]

Mr. Gareth Thomas: The latest official figures on poverty that relate to the State of Jharkhand pertain to the year 1999–2000 (National Human Development Report 2001); at this time Jharkhand was part of the state of Bihar. The percentage of people under the official poverty line was 42.6 per cent. out of the total population of 99.9 million. DFID has not undertaken an independent poverty assessment in the State of Jharkhand.

Iraq

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether there are UK representatives on the International Advisory and Monitoring Board in Iraq. [152408]

Hilary Benn: The United Kingdom is not represented on the International Advisory and Monitoring Board for Iraq (IAMB). Its members are representatives of the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the Arab Fund for Social and Economic Development and the World Bank. The IAMB's role is to provide for the independent monitoring of the Development Fund for Iraq (DFI), so it would not be appropriate for a party to DFI spending decisions to be represented on it.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to his answer of 26 January 2004, Official Report, column 24W, on Iraq, who the voting members are of the Programme Review Board which approves Coalition Provisional Authority plans for expenditures from the Development Fund for Iraq; and who the Department's secondees are to the Coalition Provisional Authority. [152403]

Hilary Benn: The voting members of the Iraqi Coalition Provisional Authority Program Review Board (PRB) are representatives of: the Iraqi Minister of Finance; the CPA's Economic Affairs, Governance and Security Policy Offices, and Office of Infrastructure and Operations; the Coalition military (Combined Joint Task Force 7); the Iraqi Council for International Co-operation; and the Governments of the United Kingdom and Australia.

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DFID secondees to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Baghdad are currently filling the posts of: Director of Operations, Policy Adviser, Financial Adviser, Senior Adviser and Institutional Development Adviser to the Ministry of Public Works, Electricity Adviser, Gender Adviser and Logistics Manager for the food Public Distribution System.

Twelve secondees, directly employed by DFID, are filling a range of posts in CPA South in Basra; and six such secondees are working in CPA Governorate offices in Dhi Qar, Kirkuk and Wasit. A further 25 posts in the CPA in Basra are currently being filled through a DFID contract with the Crown Agents.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to his answer of 20 January 2004, Official Report, column 1144W, on Iraq, if he will place in the Library reports of the meetings between his Department's staff and Coalition Provisional Authority South regarding the review of projects funded by his Department in Southern Iraq. [152409]

Hilary Benn: We will shortly be publishing an Interim Country Assistance Plan (ICAP) setting out DFID's programme in Iraq over the next two years. The ICAP reflects discussions between DFID staff and the Coalition Provisional Authority (South). A copy will be placed in the Library.

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will list the projects funded by his Department in southern Iraq that have not been subcontracted to local firms. [152410]

Hilary Benn: DFID supports a staffing project which supplies the Coalition Provisional Authority in Southern Iraq with a range of reconstruction policy advisers. This project does not include sub-contracts with local firms.

DFID does, however, fund a number of projects in Southern Iraq which do include sub-contracts with local firms. They are as follows:

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The Recovery and Infrastructure Group project is rehabilitating a number of important buildings in Southern Iraq such as hospitals and government buildings. The contract is managed by Halcrow, but local firms carry out all infrastructure work.

Similarly, Halcrow manage a contract to rehabilitate a number of regional offices. Local firms carry out all reconstruction and all materials are procured from local firms.

The Emergency Infrastructure Project is managed by Mott MacDonald. The bulk of funding for this project is spent on international procurement. However, local firms have been contracted to carry out reconstruction work. Goods and materials have also been procured from local firms for this project.

Llew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development who the members of the Iraq Coalition Provisional Authority's programme review board are; what criteria were adopted to choose the members of the board; how many United Kingdom representatives are on the board; and what their period of membership is. [151970]

Hilary Benn: The membership of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) Programme Review Board (PRB) comprises representatives of: the Iraqi Minister of Finance; the CPA's Economic Affairs, Governance and Security Policy Offices, and Office of Infrastructure and Operations; the Coalition military (Combined Joint Task Force 7); the Iraqi Council for International Co-operation; and the Governments of the United Kingdom and Australia. The UK Government have one representative on the Board, normally the Head of the DFID Office in Baghdad. Membership of the Board is not held in a personal capacity.

Nigeria

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development which consultants are retained by his Department to provide the Government of Nigeria with advice on public service delivery and civil service reform; what the value of the contracts with the consultants is; and what the nature of the consultants' brief is. [152381]

Hilary Benn: The requested information is shown in the following table.

No.Project titleConsultantConsultant's briefCurrent value (original contract value plus cost of any increases or extensions) (£)
1.Public Service Delivery InitiativeCentre for Management and Policy StudiesTo provide a team of experts with relevant experience to work with the Government of Nigeria's new Service Delivery Team54,787
2.State and Local Government Project (SLGP)HTS Consulting Ltd.To enhance the capacity and effectiveness of state and local government in Nigeria to manage resources and ensure delivery of services, in the interests of poor people20,508,289
3.Partnership for Transforming Health Services (PATHS)HLSP Consulting Ltd.The PATHS programme will assist Nigerian-led initiatives for health system reform(2)7,181,515
4.Health Sector Reform Early Start Project: Change Agent Programme (CAPS)HLSP Consulting Ltd.CAPS is a sister project to PATHS. It aims to provide two 'Change Agent Programmes' (CAP), one for "Health Sector Reform" and the other for "Immunisation Programme Reform" (IPR)1,674,128
5.Access to Justice ProgrammeThe British CouncilThe Access to Justice Programme's purpose is to support the development of Nigeria-led justice sector reform so that pro-poor policies are implemented(2)6,583,210
6.Procurement Agent for Nigeria Contraceptives and Communication against HIV/Aids ProgrammePopulation Services International (PSI)The programme will contribute to 90 per cent. of all young adults having access to STD/HIV/AIDS prevention methods by 200552,800,000

(2) Inception


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Sudan

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will make a statement on the levels of (a) malnutrition, (b) disease and (c) destitution in Southern Sudan in (i) December 2001, (ii) December 2002 and (iii) December 2003. [149985]

Hilary Benn: It was not possible to obtain the information on the overall levels of malnutrition in Southern Sudan for the month of December in the years requested. The following table lists rates of malnutrition for November through to February for the years indicated, and at the locations mentioned. These are from NGO surveys. As the NGOs would undertake surveys in areas where high levels of malnutrition were suspected they should not be taken as representative of the whole population. The rates give the proportion of children acutely malnourished. This approximates to the percentage of children who are less than 80 per cent. of the international reference weight for a given height:

Southern Sudan: Rates of malnutrition
Percentage

County200120022003
Aweil East13.9n/a25
Aweil Southn/a21.122.1
Aweil West13.9n/an/a
Gogrial3n/an/a
Magwe1723.1n/a
Northern Leech16.4n/an/a
Phou State16.8n/an/a
Sobat23.4n/an/a
Twic25.1n/an/a
Yirol9.9n/an/a

The only year where we have information on levels of disease in December in Southern Sudan is 2002. Over that year there were outbreaks of measles and whooping cough reported, with 132 cases of whooping cough of whom two died, and 85 cases of measles with three deaths. There were also reports of rabies, but there are no actual numbers of cases affected. Basic health indicators in Southern Sudan are persistently very poor, and among the worst in Africa.

In the absence of information specifically related to destitution we have referred to the monthly report of the Famine Early Warning Systems Network, which provides information on those requiring emergency humanitarian assistance in the form of food aid. The December issue of this report usually gives the harvest assessment and the needs assessment for the following year. For 2001 the main findings were that emergency

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needs were linked to the presence of insecurity in parts of Bahr-el-Ghazal, Upper Nile and Eastern Equatoria. In 2002 below average harvest combined with insecurity resulted in persisting requirements for humanitarian relief in parts of Bahr-el-Ghazal, Upper Nile and Eastern Equatoria. In 2003 agricultural production was generally good, but need for emergency assistance remained in many communities in Upper Nile and Bahr-el-Ghazal.


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