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19 May 2004 : Column 1026W—continued

Pensions Agency

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 2 March 2004, Official Report, column 865W, on pension schemes, on what grounds the NHS Pensions Agency may refuse to accept a pension transfer into their scheme; and if he will make a statement. [173906]

Mr. Hutton [holding answer 17 May 2004]: The National Health Service Pensions Agency may refuse to accept a transfer of pension rights into the NHS pension scheme ("the Scheme") if:

Personal Injury Cases

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many personal injury cases have resulted in repayment of NHS costs to the NHS in each of the last five years; what the total amount recovered was; what the categories of cases are from which recovery is expected; what the maximum amounts recoverable for each kind of treatment are; and if he will make a statement on (a) the trend in recovery of NHS costs and (b) his future plans for the recoupment scheme. [173562R]

Ms Rosie Winterton [holding answer 17 May 2004]: Under the provisions of the Road Traffic (NHS Charges) Act 1999, national health service hospital treatment costs can be recovered in cases where a person injured in a road traffic accident makes a successful claim for personal injury compensation. The costs are recovered from insurers, not the injured person. The charges are calculated using a tariff, which is currently set at £473 for treatment without admission, a daily rate fee of £582 for treatment with admission and there is a ceiling of charges which is set at £34,800.

The table shows the number of settled claims for personal injury compensation following a road traffic accident that resulted in a payment to the NHS and the total amounts paid to NHS hospitals in England, Scotland and Wales for each of the last five years.
 
19 May 2004 : Column 1027W
 

Number of cases resulting in repayment of
NHS costs
Amounts recovered and paid to NHS hospitals
(£ million)
1999–200067,46630.05
2000–01148,24975.9
2001–02182,00698.3
2002–03195,643105.03
2003–04185,533105.7

Provisions contained in the Health and Social Care (Community Health and Standards) Act 2003 allow the current system of recovery of NHS costs to be expanded so that NHS hospital treatment costs and NHS ambulance service costs will be recoverable in all cases where personal injury compensation is paid. This will in the main include employer and public liability claims, in addition to road traffic accident claims. The new scheme is due to commence on 1 April 2005. It is estimated that the expanded scheme will recover an additional £150 million per year when its full impact is realised in several years' time.

Pharmaceutical Research

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if he will make it his policy to ensure that the results of pharmaceutical research indicating negative results are made available to (a) the National Institute for Clinical Excellence and (b) the public. [171854]

Miss Melanie Johnson: Pharmaceutical companies must submit all research data to the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency in support of any application for a marketing authorisation of a medicinal product. We have no plans to compel pharmaceutical companies or others to provide unpublished research data to the National Institute for Clinical Excellence.

It is for the company or the research author(s) to decide whether they wish to publish their data.

Practitioners with a Special Interest

Dr. Cable: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what estimate he has made for each of the last five years of the number of referrals to practitioners with a special interest, broken down by (a) primary care trust and (b) strategic health authority area; [168863]
 
19 May 2004 : Column 1028W
 

(2) what estimate he has made of the cost savings expected in the current financial year as a result of referrals to practitioners with a special interest rather than to hospitals; and what projection he has made of future cost savings from this programme. [168864]

Mr. Hutton: The practitioner with special interest role is intended to offer opportunities for professional development to general practitioners and others, and to offer primary care trusts (PCTs) new flexibilities in delivering services.

In line with "Shifting the Balance of Power", PCTs are responsible for developing practitioners with special interest services. Most are now doing so, but information on referrals to practitioners with a special interest is not collected centrally. Overall, however, in 2001–02 some 600,000 procedures previously only done in hospitals were carried out in primary care. By 2002–03, this had increased to 700,000 and further increases are expected in future years. This initiative has not been introduced to save money and no central estimates of potential or actual savings to the national health service in 2004–05 have been made.

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many professions allied to medicine have been appointed as practitioners with a specialist interest in each year since the scheme started; and from which discipline they came. [172706]

Mr. Hutton: There is no central scheme for the appointment of allied health professionals with a special interest, and information on any such appointments made locally is not collected centrally.

Professional Groups (Vacancies)

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the vacancy rate was for each professional group in the North West London Strategic Health Authority in each year since 1997. [172819]

Mr. Hutton: General practitioner vacancy rates are not collected by strategic health authority.

Vacancy rates for other professional groups are only collected centrally for:

However, this data has only been collected since 1999. The figures are shown in the table.
Annex A: Department of Health Vacancies Survey, Three-month vacancy rates in England, North West London Strategic Health Authority area and Brent and Harrow Health Authority area
Percentage

Specified staff groups19992000200120022003
Qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting
England2.83.93.43.12.9
Q04North West London SHAn/an/an/a4.46.3
QARBrent and Harrow HA6.25.66.0n/an/a
Allied Health Professionals
England2.13.24.35.04.8
Q04North West London SHAn/an/an/a6.27.3
QARBrent and Harrow HA2.56.28.4n/an/a
Other qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff
England1.62.63.33.22.8
Q04North West London SHAn/an/an/a4.84.6
QARBrent and Harrow HA2.72.01.4n/an/a
Ambulance staff
England0.81.01.40.50.7
Q04North West London SHAn/an/an/a0.0(13)
QARBrent and Harrow HA0.0(13)(13)n/an/a
Consultants
England2.32.83.03.84.7
Q04North West London SHA2.11.71.14.03.4
QARBrent and Harrow HA




n/a = Not applicable.
(13)   Figures where sum of staff in post and vacancies is less than 10.
Notes:
1.   Three-month vacancies are as at 31 March each year.
2.   Three-month vacancies are vacancies which Trusts are actively trying to fill, which had lasted for three months or more (whole-time equivalents).
3.   Three month Vacancy Rates are three month vacancies expressed as a percentage of three-month vacancies plus staff in post.
4.   For 1999–2001, three-month vacancy rates are calculated using staff in post from the previous September's Workforce Census.
5.   For 2002–03, three-month vacancy rates are calculated using staff in post from the March Vacancy Survey.
Sources:
Department of Health Vacancies Survey.
Department of Health Non-Medical Workforce Census.





 
19 May 2004 : Column 1029W
 

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the vacancy rate is for each health professional group in each strategic health authority in England; and what the average figures are for (a) London and (b) England. [172820]

Mr. Hutton: The three-month vacancy rate and number for specified non-medical professional groups and consultants in each strategic health authority
 
19 May 2004 : Column 1030W
 
(SHA) as at March 2003 is shown in the table. The average three-month vacancy rate and number for London and England as at March 2003 has also been provided.

The estimated three-month general practitioner vacancy rate for England in 2003 was 3.4 per cent. It is not possible to produce reliable estimates of the vacancy rate for GPs at SHA level.
Department of Health Vacancies Survey, March 2003—Vacancies in NHS Trusts by Strategic Health Authority and NHS Trust, specified staff groups three month vacancy rates and numbers

Qualified nursing, midwifery and health visiting staff
Qualified Allied Health Professionals
Other qualified scientific, therapeutic and technical staff
Three month vacancy rate percentageThree month vacancy numberThree month vacancy rate percentageThree month vacancy numberThree month vacancy rate percentageThree month vacancy number
England2.97,9674.82,1762.81,548
Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic HA1.41675.41152.659
Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Strategic HA4.93157.4795.965
Essex Strategic HA3.42204.1463.142
London5.72,6118.45944.8510
North West London Strategic HA6.37377.31274.6111
North Central London Strategic HA6.56389.01394.1109
North East London Strategic HA3.73038.61102.542
South East London Strategic HA7.377910.71667.4194
South West London Strategic HA2.81535.3524.455
Northumberland, Tyne and Wear Strategic HA1.71773.7562.748
County Durham and Tees Valley Strategic HA0.8572.4251.111
North and East Yorkshire And Northern Lincolnshire
      Strategic HA
2.11634.9632.736
West Yorkshire Strategic HA1.62113.6861.539
Cumbria and Lancashire Strategic HA1.82023.0522.743
Greater Manchester Strategic HA3.05244.41271.857
Cheshire and Merseyside Strategic HA1.01552.8662.374
Thames Valley Strategic HA4.04007.31293.866
Hampshire and Isle of Wight Strategic HA4.64225.4763.446
Kent and Medway Strategic HA4.43124.1492.329
Surrey and Sussex Strategic HA4.15086.41475.0108
Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire Strategic HA3.64413.0681.746
South West Peninsula Strategic HA1.21063.2491.625
Dorset and Somerset Strategic HA0.7421.1121.312
South Yorkshire Strategic HA0.9822.2341.121
Trent Strategic HA1.11582.2520.923
Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland Strategic HA2.92165.1613.346
Shropshire and Staffordshire Strategic HA1.1833.6462.229
Birmingham and The Black Country Strategic HA2.23285.01032.681
Coventry, Warwickshire, Herefordshire and
      Worcestershire Strategic HA
0.8593.3401.721
Special Health Authorities1.78(14)(14)0.411

 
19 May 2004 : Column 1031W
 

Ambulance
Consultants
Three month vacancy rate percentageThree month vacancy numberThree month vacancy rate percentageThree month vacancy number
England0.71114.71,264
Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire Strategic HA(14)(14)4.453
Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Strategic HA2.1125.533
Essex Strategic HA0.0(14)3.722
London0.0(14)3.5181
North West London Strategic HA*(14)3.442
North Central London Strategic HA(14)(14)1.821
North East London Strategic HA(14)(14)3.228
South East London Strategic HA0.0(14)6.072
South West London Strategic HA(14)(14)2.519
Northumberland, Tyne and Wear Strategic HA3.0185.354
County Durham and Tees Valley Strategic HA(14)(14)7.852
North and East Yorkshire And Northern Lincolnshire
      Strategic HA
0.0(14)6.443
West Yorkshire Strategic HA0.0(14)4.961
Cumbria and Lancashire Strategic HA0.227.361
Greater Manchester Strategic HA0.0(14)6.8108
Cheshire and Merseyside Strategic HA7.3483.650
Thames Valley Strategic HA0.0(14)5.456
Hampshire and Isle of Wight Strategic HA0.0(14)5.648
Kent and Medway Strategic HA0.0(14)6.241
Surrey and Sussex Strategic HA0.0(14)5.159
Avon, Gloucestershire and Wiltshire Strategic HA2.3193.440
South West Peninsula Strategic HA0.762.922
Dorset and Somerset Strategic HA0.0(14)2.412
South Yorkshire Strategic HA0.0(14)2.924
Trent Strategic HA0.565.461
Leicestershire, Northamptonshire and Rutland Strategic HA(14)(14)5.236
Shropshire and Staffordshire Strategic HA0.0(14)6.240
Birmingham and The Black Country Strategic HA0.0(14)5.478
Coventry, Warwickshire, Herefordshire and
      Worcestershire Strategic HA
0.0(14)3.927
Special Health Authorities(14)(14)4.75


(14)   Zero.
Notes:
1.   Three-month vacancy information is as at 31 March 2003.
2.   Three-month vacancies are vacancies which trusts are actively trying to fill, which had lasted for three months or more (whole time equivalents).
3.   Three-month vacancy rates are three month vacancies expressed as a percentage of three-month vacancies plus staff in post.
4.   Three month vacancy rates are calculated using staff in post from the Vacancy Survey, March 2003, or from March 2003 consultant Mini Census.
5.   London is based on the five London Strategic Health Authorities and London Ambulance Service NHS Trust.





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