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Colombia

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (1) what assessment his Department has made of the UN Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Co-ordinators' comments on 10 May 2004 concerning the humanitarian situation in Colombia; and if he will make a statement; [173368]

(2) what (a) aid and (b) relief plans are in place for a possible humanitarian crisis in Colombia; what the predicted roll-out times are; and if he will make a statement. [173369]

Mr. Gareth Thomas: DFID notes that the Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Jan Egeland, indicated that the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), together with the Government of Colombia and Non-Governmental Organisations, intend to launch a new humanitarian plan of action next month focused on the internally displaced. DFID will consider it carefully and discuss the details with OCHA once it is launched.

DFID stands ready to provide appropriate humanitarian assistance in response to humanitarian crises wherever they occur and seeks to respond as quickly as possible against an assessment of priority needs. The extent and nature of any UK response is determined by the magnitude of need and as part of a coordinated international response.

The European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO) has already committed €8 million of humanitarian assistance for 2004, of which the United Kingdom's share is some €1.44 million.

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many people his Department estimates to be (a) internally displaced in Colombia, (b) displaced from Colombia to Panama and (c) displaced from Colombia to Venezuela; how these figures have changed since 2000; and if he will make a statement. [173443]


 
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Mr. Gareth Thomas: No universally accepted figures of displaced Colombians exist. In his statement of 10 May 2004, the Under-Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Jan Egeland, stated that 2 million people had become displaced in Colombia in the past 15 years. According to CODHES, a Colombian NGO, about 3,090,000 people were internally displaced from 1984–2003, of which 1,247,000 were over the period 2000–03. The Colombian Government figures estimates a figure of 1,148,000 over the latter period.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees estimates that there are 2,430 Colombian 'persons of concern' in Panama and around 8,860 in Venezuela. However, these figures are generally considered to represent only a proportion of displaced people to these countries, particularly in Venezuela given the effect the Venezuelan Government's concern about the influx of displaced Colombians is having on Colombians' desire to register.

Departmental Projects

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development when he will publish his strategy referred to on page 190 of the 2004 Departmental Report for improving project scoring of the Department's low-risk bilateral projects. [174119]

Hilary Benn: DFID will outline in both the Autumn Performance Report 2004, and the Departmental Report 2005, the range of measures put in place to improve project scoring. These are likely to centre upon strengthening guidance and lesson learning within DFID as key to improving programme delivery.

Iraq

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what new measures he plans to ensure the safety of British civilians who are helping to deliver aid and reconstruction in Iraq. [173648]


 
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Hilary Benn: Extensive measures are taken to protect all DFID staff and contractors. All DFID staff and consultants employed individually are provided with body armour, safety and communications equipment, security training, briefing and armed protection. Contractors are responsible for the security arrangements of their staff but the costs are covered by the UK Government. Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in receipt of DFID support are also responsible for their own security. DFID maintains a regular dialogue with them on security issues and will fund their security needs where appropriate. All of these security arrangements are kept under constant review.

Primary Education

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what percentage of children are in primary education in the top 30 UK development partner countries. [171691]

Mr. Gareth Thomas: The percentage of children that are in primary education, as measured by primary school net enrolment rates, in the UK's top 30 development partner countries is as follows:
CountryPrimary school enrolment (Percentage net)(24)
Angola37
Bangladesh89
Cambodia95
China93
Cote d'Ivoire64
Egypt, Arab Republic93
Ethiopia47
Ghana58
India1,021
Indonesia92
Jordan94
Kenya69
Malawi101
Morocco78
Mozambique54
Nepal72
Pakistan66
Philippines93
Poland98
Romania93
Russian Federation93
Sierra LeoneNo Data
South Africa89
Sri Lanka97
Tanzania47
Uganda109
Vietnam95
West Bank and GazaNo Data
Zambia66
Zimbabwe80


(24)   Percentage gross enrolment figure used as no net figure available.
Note:
The 30 countries in the table are those used to measure the universal primary education (UPE) target included in the PSA 2001–04.
Source:
World Development Indicators 2003 CD rom.



Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of the number of children of official school age (as defined by the national education system) who are enrolled in school to the population of the corresponding official school age.
 
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Enrolment ratios, while a useful measure of participation in education, also have significant limitations, which can result, on occasion, on an figure in excess of 100 per cent. for enrolments rates in a year, primarily due to errors in estimates of school age populations. School administrators may also report exaggerated enrolments, especially if there is a financial incentive to do so, overage or underage enrolments frequently occur for cultural or economic reasons and there can be a lack of distinction between new entrants and repeaters. The data for some countries, including Uganda, may be revised as a result of the factors in the table.

Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what percentage of children are enrolled in primary school in each of the 16 countries in sub-Saharan Africa for which the Millennium Development Goal on enrolment has been set. [171680]

Mr. Gareth Thomas: The percentage of children who are enrolled in primary school in each of the 16 countries in sub-Saharan Africa for which the MDG on enrolment has been set is as follows:
CountryPrimary school enrolment (Percentage net)
Congo, Democratic Republic33
Ethiopia47
Ghana58
Kenya69
Lesotho78
Malawi101
Mozambique54
NigeriaNo data
Rwanda97
Sierra LeoneNo data
South Africa89
Sudan46
Tanzania47
Uganda109
Zambia66
Zimbabwe80




Source:
DFID's PSA reporting.



Net enrolment ratio is the ratio of the number of children of official school age (as defined by the national education system) who are enrolled in school to the population of the corresponding official school age. Enrolment ratios, while a useful measure of participation in education, also have significant limitations, which can result, on occasion, on a figure in excess of 100 per cent. for enrolments rates in a year, primarily due to errors in estimates of school age populations. School administrators may also report exaggerated enrolments, especially if there is a financial incentive to do so, overage or underage enrolments frequently occur for cultural or economic reasons and there can be a lack of distinction between new entrants and repeaters. The data for some countries, including Uganda, may be revised as a result of the above factors.

World Bank

Angus Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what programmes his Department (a) (i) runs and (ii) finances through the Inter-American Development Bank and (b) finances
 
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through the World Bank aimed at solving the social and economic problems of the native tribes in South America; which (A) countries and (B) tribes are included in each programme; when each was established; and what contribution his Department has made in each year of the programme. [173819]

Mr. Gareth Thomas: 10 per cent. of the Latin American population is indigenous, ranging from less than 1 per cent. in countries such as Brazil and Venezuela, to over 50 per cent. in Bolivia and Guatemala. Most of DFID's programmes in Latin America address the issue of inclusion of various excluded populations, including indigenous people. This includes its support through the World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank (IDB).

While both the IDB and the World Bank have a number of projects, or components of projects, specifically targeted at indigenous people, other projects, not so targeted, often have a similar or greater impact. This is particularly the case in countries where indigenous people represent a significant proportion of the population.

DFID is specifically working with the IDB to contribute to its efforts to ensure appropriate account is taken of indigenous people's issues in its policies and their implementation. DFID is providing US$203,500 contribution to the consultation process in the IDE's preparation of an updated strategic framework on indigenous development. At present, DFID does not have any specific programmes targeted at indigenous people in Latin America with the World Bank.


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