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CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT

Positive Activities Programme

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will make a statement on the Positive Activities Programme; and what the level of funding will be made available for the programme in each year from 2003 to 2006. [185354]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: I have been asked to reply.

The Positive Activities for Young People (PAYP) programme was launched in spring 2003 offering diversionary activities aimed at young people most at risk of social exclusion, truancy and committing crime. The programme is being delivered across England from May 2003 to March 2006.

In 2003–04 PAYP funding of £25 million was provided by the Department for Education and Skills, the Big Lottery Fund and the Home Office to deliver a minimum of 22,000 full-time places during all school holiday periods. In addition to the activities, one-to-one support was made available for the most "at risk" young people. Baselines for 2004–05 and 2005–06 have yet to be finalised following this year's Spending Review.

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many young people participated in the Positive Activities Programme in 2003. [185355]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: I have been asked to reply.

The Positive Activities for Young People (PAYP) programme was launched in spring 2003. At least 75,000 young people participated in PAYP activities during the summer holidays of 2003 with approximately another 40,000 taking part during the October half term and Christmas holidays.

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will list the local education authorities which participated in the Positive Activities Programme in (a) 2003–04 and (b) 2004–05. [185356]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: I have been asked to reply.

The Positive Activities for Young People (PAYP) programme is a cross-government programme which is administered by the Department for Education and Skills. Responsibility for managing programme delivery in each region is devolved to the nine regional government offices. Delivery plans prepared by each of the regional government offices show that the Positive Activities for Young People programme has operated in every local education authority area in both 2003–04 and 2004–05

DEFENCE

Army Training

Mr. Keetch: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many personnel can be trained at any one time at (a) ITR Catterick, (b) ATR Pirbright, (c) ATR Lichfield and (d) ATR Winchester; how many personnel underwent training at each site in each of the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement on Army and infantry recruitment and training. [184838]


 
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Mr. Caplin: The following tables show the training capacity and numbers who underwent training by month during financial year 2003–04 for Army Training Regiment Pirbright (ATR(P)), ATR Lichfield (ATR(L)) and ATR Winchester (ATR(W)) and Infantry Training Centre (ITC) Catterick.
Table 1: Training capacity

UnitTraining capacity
ATR Pirbright1,008
ATR Lichfield520
ATR Winchester520
ITC Catterick2,360

The training capacity detailed for ATR(P), ATR(L) and ATR(W) is limited by the number of training teams that are available at any one time. For example, ATR(W) has an establishment of 15 training teams with a maximum capacity of 40 trainees per training team. However, due to leave and instructor training, the number of training teams that are available for training purposes at any one time is 13. This figure, multiplied by 40, provides the training capacity of 520 for ATR(W).

ITC Catterick combines both Phase 1 (initial) and Phase 2 (trade) training for the Infantry. Since the establishment of the Combined Infantry Training course at ITC Catterick in 2002, infantry training at Catterick cannot be divided into defined stages, as the course is essentially one seamless progression from Phase 1 to Phase 2.
Table 2: Numbers under training by month in FY 2003–04

Unit
ATR(P)ATR(L)ATR(W)ITC(C)
2003
April8404115422,069
May7783694831,925
June9562454322,017
July7172093951,889
August9333494161,787
September1,0254075231,973
October7802935242,031
November7082834162,053
December9723455191,738
2004
January9182814021,994
February8942513942,100
March8592744262,020

The figures in Table 2 include those trainees in remedial and rehabilitation training, who are additional to training capacity. Hence, in some months, the figures quoted will exceed the training capacity detailed in Table 1.

Recruitment is buoyant and the Army Training and Recruiting Agency has outperformed against mandated targets over the last two years. Although some battalions are understrength, the general situation across the infantry remains healthy. It is difficult to attain an even manning balance across all regiments. Some regiments benefit from excellent recruitment inflow and a balance has to be made. Where there are shortages elsewhere every effort is made to alleviate the situation.
 
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C-17 Aircraft

Mr. Gerald Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on the leased C-17 aircraft; and who bears the cost, under the contract, should an aircraft be lost as a result of pilot error or in combat. [183405]

Mr. Caplin: At the conclusion of the current lease arrangement, we intend to buy the current fleet of four aircraft. We intend to purchase a further aircraft bringing our C-17 fleet up to five aircraft.

In the meantime, should a leased aircraft be lost as a result of pilot error or in combat, the contractual agreement requires that the Ministry of Defence pay the residual value and fulfil the remaining lease payments.

Combat and Operational Clothing

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what steps he took to establish that the tender for combat and operational clothing supplies DC4BESL/1002 Cut and Sew had been conducted in accordance with EU tendering rules. [186202]

Mr. Ingram: All tenders for non-warlike stores are conducted in accordance with the Public Supply Contract Regulations 1995.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what estimate he has made of the number of jobs that would (a) be created in the UK if the contract for combat and operational clothing supplies DC4BESL/1002 Cut and Sew were to be let to a UK company and (b) be lost in the UK if the contract was awarded to a firm in China. [186203]

Mr. Ingram: The contract referred to has been awarded to a United Kingdom company creating a small number of quality jobs and it safeguards approximately 40 other jobs. Some new positions have already been advertised in both local and national press, and it is anticipated that further jobs will be created for UK staff during the life of the contract.

No direct contract has been awarded to China and as such its impact has not been measured.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what criteria were set down for shortlisting companies tendering for the combat and operational clothing contract DC4DESL/1002; and whether all the companies on the shortlist met all the criteria. [184363]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 15 July 2004]: Criteria used, through a Pre-Qualification Questionnaire, were consistent with the Public Supply Contract Regulations 1995; specifically Regulations 14, 15, 16, 17 and 20. All companies selected for the Tender Panel met the criteria.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will make a statement on security of supply in relation to contract DC4BESL/1002 Cut and Sew from China. [184348]

Mr. Ingram: The production of these garments is considered low risk—the most significant technical aspect is the maintenance of the required Infra Red Reflective (IRR) standard. Not withstanding this, the Prime Contractor has identified controls to ensure
 
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performance levels are maintained. The Prime Contractor will also have in place a viable logistic system to maintain security of supply.


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